Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$159.49
CD$153.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$20.99
CD$17.99

Rock - Released April 23, 1971 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Behind the album cover dreamt up by Andy Warhol with its iconic close-up crotch was a new opiate – a psychedelic whirlwind of rock’n’roll, blues, country and rhythm'n'blues. Following the influential albums Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed, on April 23rd 1971 Mick Jagger and Keith Richards revealed their hugely impressive compositions, with carnivorous guitar riffs (Brown Sugar) haunted by hard drugs (Sister Morphine). On Sticky Fingers, we find a demonic sensuality (Wild Horses), violently percussive themes (Sway) and dirty, sticky blues (You Gotta to Move). Featuring top-class musicians (Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson, Bobby Keys, Nicky Hopkins, Paul Buckmaster...), this masterpiece is also the first 100% Rolling Stones album without Brian Jones, with stunning debuts from Mick Taylor (Can't You Hear Me Knocking). It is without a doubt among the top ten greatest records in the history of rock'n'roll. Plus, this sumptuous Deluxe Edition includes an extra disc full of unreleased takes and live tracks recorded on March 14, 1971 at the Roundhouse in London. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$18.99

Rock - Released June 9, 1978 | Polydor Associated Labels

Hi-Res
While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Rock - Released September 25, 2020 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Rock - Released April 23, 2020 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$33.99
CD$29.49

Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Dark and glistening. Like a cave on the French Riviera. That’s where Jagger and Richards' band – living as tax exiles - recorded the immense Exile on Main Street, a musical feast with dishes served as country (Sweet Black Angel, Sweet Virginia), gospel (Shine a Light), blues (Shake Your Hips) and visceral rock'n'roll (the opening of Rocks Off and the cult track Happy with Keith Richards on vocals). The Rolling Stones may have been at the height of fame, but this masterpiece came from the heart and soul, with a dark and dirty sound and a sincere and raw style. American roots music (country, blues, folk) had rarely sounded so original. Jagger sings like an inspired old sage. Richards unleashes sharp, sublime guitar riffs. After all these years, we still can’t find the slightest flaw in this double album which many consider to be The Rolling Stones’ best... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

Tattoo You starts off strong, very strong, even. Right from the opening track, Start Me Up, the Stones do what they do best, and despite your best efforts you'll be shimmying and tapping your foot to the rhythm in no time. The first part of this album, which was released in August 1981, follows suit with rock jams (Little T&A) as well as blues jams (Black Limousine), all of which are upbeat. The second part is like a well-earned rest after the amped-up first half. While it may seem a bit bland in comparison, some of the highlights are the atmospheric and surprisingly modern ballad, Heaven, and the more classic, Waiting On A Friend. The album nevertheless maintains a sense of coherence and is still considered one of the most iconic albums of the time – something that isn’t often said about the Stones’ later material – so it’s easy to forget it’s made up of recordings that didn’t make it into their previous albums. © Iskender Fay/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$13.49
CD$11.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Tattoo You starts off strong, very strong, even. Right from the opening track, Start Me Up, the Stones do what they do best, and despite your best efforts you'll be shimmying and tapping your foot to the rhythm in no time. The first part of this album, which was released in August 1981, follows suit with rock jams (Little T&A) as well as blues jams (Black Limousine), all of which are upbeat. The second part is like a well-earned rest after the amped-up first half. While it may seem a bit bland in comparison, some of the highlights are the atmospheric and surprisingly modern ballad, Heaven, and the more classic, Waiting On A Friend. The album nevertheless maintains a sense of coherence and is still considered one of the most iconic albums of the time – something that isn’t often said about the Stones’ later material – so it’s easy to forget it’s made up of recordings that didn’t make it into their previous albums. © Iskender Fay/Qobuz
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

Sliding out of perhaps the greatest winning streak in rock history, the Stones slipped into decadence and rock star excess with Goats Head Soup, their sequel to Exile on Main St. This is where the Stones' image began to eclipse their accomplishments, as Mick ascended to jet-setting celebrity and Keith slowly sunk deeper into addiction, and it's possible hearing them moving in both directions on Goats Head Soup, at times in the same song. As Jagger plays the devil (or, dances with Mr. D, as he likes to say), the sex and sleaze quotient is increased, all of it underpinned by some genuinely affecting heartbreak, highlighted by "Angie." This may not be as downright funky, freaky, and fantastic as Exile, yet the extra layer of gloss brings out the enunciated lyrics, added strings, wah-wah guitars, explicit sex, and violence, making it all seem trippily decadent. If it doesn't seem like there's a surplus of classics here, all the songs work well, illustrating just how far they've traveled in their songcraft, as well as their exceptional talent as a band -- they make this all sound really easy and darkly alluring, even when the sex'n'satanism seems a little silly. To top it all of, they cap off this utterly excessive album with "Star Star," a nasty Chuck Berry rip that grooves on its own mean vulgarity -- its real title is "Starf*cker," if you need any clarification, and even though they got nastier (the entirety of Undercover, for instance), they never again made something this dirty or nasty. And, it never feels more at home than it does at the end of this excessive record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$13.49
CD$11.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Behind the album cover dreamt up by Andy Warhol with its iconic close-up crotch was a new opiate – a psychedelic whirlwind of rock’n’roll, blues, country and rhythm'n'blues. Following the influential albums Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed, on April 23rd 1971 Mick Jagger and Keith Richards revealed their hugely impressive compositions, with carnivorous guitar riffs (Brown Sugar) haunted by hard drugs (Sister Morphine). On Sticky Fingers, we find a demonic sensuality (Wild Horses), violently percussive themes (Sway) and dirty, sticky blues (You Gotta to Move). Featuring top-class musicians (Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson, Bobby Keys, Nicky Hopkins, Paul Buckmaster...), this masterpiece is also the first 100% Rolling Stones album without Brian Jones, with stunning debuts from Mick Taylor (Can't You Hear Me Knocking). It is without a doubt among the top ten greatest records in the history of rock'n'roll. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$44.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1968 | AZ

The three-disc box set Singles Collection: The London Years contains every single the Rolling Stones released during the '60s, including both the A- and B-sides. It is the first Stones compilation that tries to be comprehensive and logical -- for all their attributes, the two Hot Rocks sets and the two Big Hits collections didn't present the singles in chronological order. In essence, the previous compilations were excellent samplers, where Singles Collection tells most of the story (certain albums, like Aftermath, Beggars Banquet, and Let It Bleed, fill in the gaps left by the singles). The Rolling Stones made genuine albums -- even their early R&B/blues albums were impeccably paced -- but their singles had a power all their own, which is quite clearly illustrated by the Singles Collection. By presenting the singles in chronological order, the set takes on a relentless, exhilarating pace with each hit and neglected B-side piling on top of each other, adding a new dimension to the group; it has a power it wouldn't have had if it tried to sample from the albums. Although it cheats near the end, adding singles from the Metamorphosis outtakes collection and two singles from Sticky Fingers, this captures the essence of the '60s Stones as well as any compilation could. Casual fans might want to stick with the Hot Rocks sets, since they just have the hits, but for those that want a little bit more, the Singles Collection is absolutely essential. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$31.49
CD$26.99

Rock - Released December 8, 1967 | ABKCO Music & Records

Hi-Res
When Their Satanic Majesties Request was released on December 8th, 1967 the world of rock’n’roll was swimming in an ocean of lysergic acid diethylamide. LSD for short… This overdose of the most hallucinogenic drugs launched rock’n’roll into every imaginable excess of psychedelic. There were of course the genre’s ambassadors, such as Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and 13th Floor Elevators, as well as newcomers like the Beatles with Sgt Pepper’s, the Byrds with Eight Miles High and, our point of interest, the Rolling Stones with Their Satanic Majesties Request. While it doesn’t reach the heights of some of the masterpieces of Jagger, Richards and company, this eighth studio album, for which recording was halted by the legal affairs of the band members, remains a fascinating musical UFO. Here again the internal chaos pushed producer Andrew Loog Oldham towards the exit, who was replaced by Glyn Johns and Eddie Kramer. With touches of Mellotron, dulcimer, and tablas, the Stones embark their semantic on unique psychedelic paths, and the result is astounding, for instance on 2,000 Light Years From Home, THE trippiest song of the album. And with She’s A Rainbow, they also manage to give us the inevitable singles they are known for! All in all, this album has aged beautifully and must urgently be re-explored thanks to this 50th-anniversary remastered edition, which offers both stereo and mono versions. © MD/Qobuz
From
CD$14.99

Rock - Released December 5, 1969 | ABKCO Music and Records, Inc.

Mostly recorded without Brian Jones -- who died several months before its release (although he does play on two tracks) and was replaced by Mick Taylor (who also plays on just two songs) -- this extends the rock and blues feel of Beggars Banquet into slightly harder-rocking, more demonically sexual territory. The Stones were never as consistent on album as their main rivals, the Beatles, and Let It Bleed suffers from some rather perfunctory tracks, like "Monkey Man" and a countrified remake of the classic "Honky Tonk Woman" (here titled "Country Honk"). Yet some of the songs are among their very best, especially "Gimme Shelter," with its shimmering guitar lines and apocalyptic lyrics; the harmonica-driven "Midnight Rambler"; the druggy party ambience of the title track; and the stunning "You Can't Always Get What You Want," which was the Stones' "Hey Jude" of sorts, with its epic structure, horns, philosophical lyrics, and swelling choral vocals. "You Got the Silver" (Keith Richards' first lead vocal) and Robert Johnson's "Love in Vain," by contrast, were as close to the roots of acoustic down-home blues as the Stones ever got. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Rock - Released December 2, 2016 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Blue & Lonesome is the first studio album in over a decade from The Rolling Stones. Recorded in just three days in London, England, Blue & Lonesome takes the band back to their roots and the passion for blues music which has always been at the heart and soul of the Rolling Stones. Blue & Lonesome is available in various formats and will be released on December 2nd by Polydor Records. The album was recorded over the course of just three short days in December 2015 at British Grove Studios in West London, just a stone’s throw from Richmond and Eel Pie Island where the Stones started out as a young blues band playing pubs and clubs. Their approach to the album was that it should be spontaneous and played live in the studio without overdubs. The band – Mick Jagger (vocals & harp), Keith Richards (guitar), Charlie Watts (drums), and Ronnie Wood (guitar) were joined by their long time touring sidemen Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (keyboards) and, for two of the twelve tracks, by old friend Eric Clapton, who happened to be in the next studio making his own album. Blue & Lonesome sees the Rolling Stones tipping their hats to their early days as a blues band when they played the music of Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, Eddie Taylor, Little Walter and Howlin’ Wolf – artists whose songs are featured on this album. The tracks are – ‘Just Your Fool’, ‘Commit A Crime’, ‘Blue And Lonesome’, ‘All Of Your Love’, ‘I Gotta Go’, ‘Everybody Knows About My Good Thing’, ‘Ride ‘Em On Down’, ‘Hate To See You Go’, ‘Hoo Doo Blues’, ‘Little Rain’, ‘Just Like I Treat You’, ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’. “This album is manifest testament to the purity of their love for making music, and the blues is, for the Stones, the fountainhead of everything they do.” - Don Was, Co-Producer of Blue & Lonesome. - @rollingstones.com
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Polydor Associated Labels

While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

The recording of Black and Blue took place at the same time as the auditions for guitarist Mick Taylor’s replacement. It's for that reason that the sessions were stalled and dragged on long enough to see the departure of an exasperated Glyn Johns – one of the Stones’ most loyal sound engineers who was involved in the production of their most successful albums – and finally the official addition of Ron Wood. A former guitarist for Rod Stewart, Wood wasn't as virtuosic as Mick Taylor but he was still an experienced musician and most importantly, he got along marvellously with the original members of the band. While we often remember the kitsch and simple ballads, Fool to Cry, and Memory Hotel from Black And Blue, it's also worth mentioning the tracks that are closer to what the Rolling Stones originally envisaged when they made the album: an eclectic album with Funk influences (Hot Stuff), Reggae (Cherry Oh Baby), and sometimes even sophisticated Blues/Jazz (on the amazing Melody). That being said, it wouldn’t be a true Stones album if here and there they didn’t show off their talent for creating a unique musical identity with electric guitars (Hand Of Fate, Crazy Mama). © Iskender Fay/Qobuz
From
CD$14.99

Rock - Released July 30, 1965 | ABKCO Music and Records, Inc.

In 1965, the Stones finally proved themselves capable of writing classic rock singles that mined their R&B/blues roots, but updated them into a more guitar-based, thoroughly contemporary context. The first enduring Jagger-Richards classics are here -- "The Last Time," its menacing, folky B-side "Play With Fire," and the riff-driven "Satisfaction," which made them superstars in the States and defined their sound and rebellious attitude better than any other single song. On the rest of the album, they largely opted for mid-'60s soul covers, Marvin Gaye's "Hitch Hike," Solomon Burke's "Cry to Me," and Sam Cooke's "Good Times" being particular standouts. "I'm All Right" (based on a Bo Diddley sound) showed their 1965 sound at its rawest, and there are a couple of fun, though derivative, bluesy originals in "The Spider and the Fly" and "The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
From
HI-RES$25.49
CD$21.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
Dark and glistening. Like a cave on the French Riviera. That’s where Jagger and Richards' band – living as tax exiles - recorded the immense Exile on Main Street, a musical feast with dishes served as country (Sweet Black Angel, Sweet Virginia), gospel (Shine a Light), blues (Shake Your Hips) and visceral rock'n'roll (the opening of Rocks Off and the cult track Happy with Keith Richards on vocals). The Rolling Stones may have been at the height of fame, but this masterpiece came from the heart and soul, with a dark and dirty sound and a sincere and raw style. American roots music (country, blues, folk) had rarely sounded so original. Jagger sings like an inspired old sage. Richards unleashes sharp, sublime guitar riffs. After all these years, we still can’t find the slightest flaw in this double album which many consider to be The Rolling Stones’ best... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Rock - Released November 8, 2019 | Mercury Studios

Hi-Res

Artist

The Rolling Stones in the magazine