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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released April 23, 2020 | Polydor Records

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Blues - Released December 2, 2016 | Polydor Records

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Blue & Lonesome is the first studio album in over a decade from The Rolling Stones. Recorded in just three days in London, England, Blue & Lonesome takes the band back to their roots and the passion for blues music which has always been at the heart and soul of the Rolling Stones. Blue & Lonesome is available in various formats and will be released on December 2nd by Polydor Records. The album was recorded over the course of just three short days in December 2015 at British Grove Studios in West London, just a stone’s throw from Richmond and Eel Pie Island where the Stones started out as a young blues band playing pubs and clubs. Their approach to the album was that it should be spontaneous and played live in the studio without overdubs. The band – Mick Jagger (vocals & harp), Keith Richards (guitar), Charlie Watts (drums), and Ronnie Wood (guitar) were joined by their long time touring sidemen Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (keyboards) and, for two of the twelve tracks, by old friend Eric Clapton, who happened to be in the next studio making his own album. Blue & Lonesome sees the Rolling Stones tipping their hats to their early days as a blues band when they played the music of Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, Eddie Taylor, Little Walter and Howlin’ Wolf – artists whose songs are featured on this album. The tracks are – ‘Just Your Fool’, ‘Commit A Crime’, ‘Blue And Lonesome’, ‘All Of Your Love’, ‘I Gotta Go’, ‘Everybody Knows About My Good Thing’, ‘Ride ‘Em On Down’, ‘Hate To See You Go’, ‘Hoo Doo Blues’, ‘Little Rain’, ‘Just Like I Treat You’, ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’. “This album is manifest testament to the purity of their love for making music, and the blues is, for the Stones, the fountainhead of everything they do.” - Don Was, Co-Producer of Blue & Lonesome. - @rollingstones.com
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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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A live document of the Brian Jones-era Rolling Stones sounds enticing, but the actual product is a letdown, owing to a mixture of factors, some beyond the producers' control and other very much their doing. The sound on the original LP was lousy, and for that matter not all of it's live; a couple of old studio R&B covers were augmented by screaming fans that had obviously been overdubbed. Still, the album has its virtues as a historical document, with some extremely important caveats for anyone not old enough to recognize the inherent limitations in a live album of this vintage. The first concerns the history of this release -- the Got Live if You Want It! album (not to be confused with the superior sounding but much shorter, U.K.-only extended-play single, issued in England in mid-1965) was a U.S.-only release in late 1966, intended to feed a seemingly insatiable American market. As a best-of album had been issued in March 1966 and Aftermath in June of the same year, and the Stones had just come off of a major U.S. tour (which proved to be their last for over three years), another album was needed to bridge the gap in America between the those earlier LPs, the two most recent singles -- "Paint It, Black" and "Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?" -- and the Between the Buttons album, which was not going to make it out in time for the Christmas season. The result was Got Live If You Want It!, which was intended to be recorded at a concert at Royal Albert Hall on September 23, 1966, the Stones' first live appearance in England in over a year. The problem was, as was memorably stated by a writer in Rolling Stone magazine a few years later, the Stones in those days didn't play concerts -- they played riots, and that was precisely what happened at Royal Albert Hall, as several hundred fans charged the stage, overwhelming the band before they'd gotten through the opening number "Paint It, Black." The scene was captured in the footage later used in the promotional film for "Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?" What was left of the show, once order was restored, was taped, along with at least two other shows on that tour over the next week or so; and it should also be remembered that in those days the group seldom played for more than 30 to 40 minutes, and sometimes less than that, much like the Beatles in concert. And the audience noise, much as it was with the Beatles, was overwhelming in the days before stacks of Marshall amps became routine in a band's equipment; indeed, at some shows, at certain moments, only the tempo of Charlie Watts' drumming could tell you which song the group was playing, and the bandmembers couldn't hear much more than the crowd -- matters such as tuning instruments and precise playing, even down to the most routine changes, became exercises in futility. Add to that the limitations of live recording, and the inevitable sound leakages and other problems, and one can see how this album was easier to conceive than to actually bring off successfully. When all of the tapes were assembled, the producers were left with about 28 minutes of material that was usable to varying degrees, and even that was somewhat wishful thinking by the standards of the day. (Apart from the Kinks' Live at Kelvin Hall [aka The Live Kinks], few groups or record labels in 1967 had the courage to release a concert album that sounded like the real article.) And here, someone -- the Stones' producer, London Records, whoever -- started fiddling around, twirling knobs, changing balances, and making the stuff supposedly sound "better," and bringing in a couple of studio tracks, "I've Been Loving You Too Long" and "Fortune Teller," and laying on some crowd noise to bring the show up to an acceptable length for an LP. © Richie Unterberger & Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released November 10, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released June 9, 1978 | Polydor Associated Labels

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While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 6, 1975 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released December 1, 1972 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released January 11, 1972 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released September 4, 1970 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released December 5, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released December 5, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released September 12, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released September 12, 1969 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released December 6, 1968 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Recorded between 1968 and 1972, The Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet is a real rock’n’roll feast. One of the biggest feasts in history no doubt! Right from the first few shamanic bars of Sympathy For The Devil, it’s evident that Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were trying to summon demons with their wickedly raw music. Blues, violence, rhythm'n'blues, sex, country, African music, revolt, soul, drugs and lust – there’s nothing missing from this electric frenzy. With its satanic prose, the album is carried by haunted guitars and minimalist rhythms. Here, the blue note either sweats buckets (Parachute Woman) or appears completely stripped down (Prodigal Son and Factory Girl). Rock had never been so poisonous and fascinating (Street Fighting Man). Richards releases bursts of demented guitar riffs while Jagger sings with unprecedented power and sincerity. The Stones would continue to build on this momentum with three other masterpieces: Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1968 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released December 8, 1967 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released July 14, 1967 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released January 20, 1967 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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