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Rock - Released April 23, 1971 | Polydor Records

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Behind the album cover dreamt up by Andy Warhol with its iconic close-up crotch was a new opiate – a psychedelic whirlwind of rock’n’roll, blues, country and rhythm'n'blues. Following the influential albums Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed, on April 23rd 1971 Mick Jagger and Keith Richards revealed their hugely impressive compositions, with carnivorous guitar riffs (Brown Sugar) haunted by hard drugs (Sister Morphine). On Sticky Fingers, we find a demonic sensuality (Wild Horses), violently percussive themes (Sway) and dirty, sticky blues (You Gotta to Move). Featuring top-class musicians (Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson, Bobby Keys, Nicky Hopkins, Paul Buckmaster...), this masterpiece is also the first 100% Rolling Stones album without Brian Jones, with stunning debuts from Mick Taylor (Can't You Hear Me Knocking). It is without a doubt among the top ten greatest records in the history of rock'n'roll. Plus, this sumptuous Deluxe Edition includes an extra disc full of unreleased takes and live tracks recorded on March 14, 1971 at the Roundhouse in London. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Tattoo You starts off strong, very strong, even. Right from the opening track, Start Me Up, the Stones do what they do best, and despite your best efforts you'll be shimmying and tapping your foot to the rhythm in no time. The first part of this album, which was released in August 1981, follows suit with rock jams (Little T&A) as well as blues jams (Black Limousine), all of which are upbeat. The second part is like a well-earned rest after the amped-up first half. While it may seem a bit bland in comparison, some of the highlights are the atmospheric and surprisingly modern ballad, Heaven, and the more classic, Waiting On A Friend. The album nevertheless maintains a sense of coherence and is still considered one of the most iconic albums of the time – something that isn’t often said about the Stones’ later material – so it’s easy to forget it’s made up of recordings that didn’t make it into their previous albums. © Iskender Fay/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Behind the album cover dreamt up by Andy Warhol with its iconic close-up crotch was a new opiate – a psychedelic whirlwind of rock’n’roll, blues, country and rhythm'n'blues. Following the influential albums Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed, on April 23rd 1971 Mick Jagger and Keith Richards revealed their hugely impressive compositions, with carnivorous guitar riffs (Brown Sugar) haunted by hard drugs (Sister Morphine). On Sticky Fingers, we find a demonic sensuality (Wild Horses), violently percussive themes (Sway) and dirty, sticky blues (You Gotta to Move). Featuring top-class musicians (Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson, Bobby Keys, Nicky Hopkins, Paul Buckmaster...), this masterpiece is also the first 100% Rolling Stones album without Brian Jones, with stunning debuts from Mick Taylor (Can't You Hear Me Knocking). It is without a doubt among the top ten greatest records in the history of rock'n'roll. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Dark and glistening. Like a cave on the French Riviera. That’s where Jagger and Richards' band – living as tax exiles - recorded the immense Exile on Main Street, a musical feast with dishes served as country (Sweet Black Angel, Sweet Virginia), gospel (Shine a Light), blues (Shake Your Hips) and visceral rock'n'roll (the opening of Rocks Off and the cult track Happy with Keith Richards on vocals). The Rolling Stones may have been at the height of fame, but this masterpiece came from the heart and soul, with a dark and dirty sound and a sincere and raw style. American roots music (country, blues, folk) had rarely sounded so original. Jagger sings like an inspired old sage. Richards unleashes sharp, sublime guitar riffs. After all these years, we still can’t find the slightest flaw in this double album which many consider to be The Rolling Stones’ best... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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They are unstoppable and their fans insatiable, so the show must go on! And while there is already so much archived Rolling Stones material, this bit, released in Autumn 2018, is definitely worth a listen. Recorded in November 1994 at the Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Voodoo Lounge Uncut documents the tour that followed the studio album Voodoo Lounge released in July that same year. By the book, unsurprising, but effective as always with the Jagger/Richards combination. The shows are outright outrageous and are filled with pure, hard-core rock’n’roll. It’s stripped bare, no frills, and it sounds loud and clear. Even for their hit songs that have been heard a million times such as Satisfaction, Sympathy For The Devil, Street Fighting Man, Start Me Up, It's Only Rock 'N' Roll, Brown Sugar, Jumpin’ Jack Flash, Miss You and Honky Tonk Women, the Stones give it their all. They even invited three special guests to their electric fiesta: Sheryl Crow (Live With Me), Robert Cray (Stop Breakin' Down Blues) and Bo Diddley (Who Do You Love?). Once again: it’s only rock’n’roll but we like it, we like it, yes we do! © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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The recording of Black and Blue took place at the same time as the auditions for guitarist Mick Taylor’s replacement. It's for that reason that the sessions were stalled and dragged on long enough to see the departure of an exasperated Glyn Johns – one of the Stones’ most loyal sound engineers who was involved in the production of their most successful albums – and finally the official addition of Ron Wood. A former guitarist for Rod Stewart, Wood wasn't as virtuosic as Mick Taylor but he was still an experienced musician and most importantly, he got along marvellously with the original members of the band. While we often remember the kitsch and simple ballads, Fool to Cry, and Memory Hotel from Black And Blue, it's also worth mentioning the tracks that are closer to what the Rolling Stones originally envisaged when they made the album: an eclectic album with Funk influences (Hot Stuff), Reggae (Cherry Oh Baby), and sometimes even sophisticated Blues/Jazz (on the amazing Melody). That being said, it wouldn’t be a true Stones album if here and there they didn’t show off their talent for creating a unique musical identity with electric guitars (Hand Of Fate, Crazy Mama). © Iskender Fay/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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After their 1968-1972 hit records Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile on Main Street, the Rolling Stones’ inspiration began to take a nosedive. One year after the honest record Goats Head Soup, the self-proclaimed greatest rock'n'roll band in the world released It's Only Rock'n Roll in October 1974. The indispensable Jimmy Miller, producer of their five previous records, was no longer with them and so Mick and Keith had fun behind the console under the pseudonym ‘The Glimmer Twins’. By then untouchable world stars, The Rolling Stones on this 12th studio album were decadent and totally indifferent to the hits of the time. What they offered up was rather different from the content of their golden age. It's Only Rock'n Roll sounded like free-wheeling rock, with the unmistakeable Rolling Stones sound (Richards’ copyrighted riffs and Jagger’s inimitable voice included) but without the songwriting to match that of their past hits. Songs such as Dance Little Sister, Short and Curlies or the rather energetic cover of the Temptations’ Ain't Too Proud to Beg still showcase the freshly 30-year-old Englishmen’s know-how. And the eponymous It's Only Rock'n Roll managed to become a sort of mini anthem that continued to be sung on stage for decades. This record is above all Jagger’s show. On ballads such as If You Really Want to Be My Friend, his voice reaches new heights. And on the very funky Fingerprint File, he recalls his visceral passion for furious rhythms. As disco began to take off, he dreamt of himself as the living god of this glittering musical style – a style that’s light years away from the DNA of his band. It's Only Rock'n Roll is the last Rolling Stones album with Mick Taylor (later replaced by Ron Wood who already features on one track) whose occasional solos remind us that he is technically superior to his boss. One wonders if, in the end, the iconic album cover by the Belgian cartoonist Guy Peellaert isn't the real masterpiece of this sometimes endearing but a little shaky album. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | Eagle Rock Entertainment

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Polydor Records

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While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Polydor Records

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The Rolling Stones in the magazine