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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Recorded between 1968 and 1972, The Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet is a real rock’n’roll feast. One of the biggest feasts in history no doubt! Right from the first few shamanic bars of Sympathy For The Devil, it’s evident that Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were trying to summon demons with their wickedly raw music. Blues, violence, rhythm'n'blues, sex, country, African music, revolt, soul, drugs and lust – there’s nothing missing from this electric frenzy. With its satanic prose, the album is carried by haunted guitars and minimalist rhythms. Here, the blue note either sweats buckets (Parachute Woman) or appears completely stripped down (Prodigal Son and Factory Girl). Rock had never been so poisonous and fascinating (Street Fighting Man). Richards releases bursts of demented guitar riffs while Jagger sings with unprecedented power and sincerity. The Stones would continue to build on this momentum with three other masterpieces: Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 8, 1967 | ABKCO Music & Records

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When Their Satanic Majesties Request was released on December 8th, 1967 the world of rock’n’roll was swimming in an ocean of lysergic acid diethylamide. LSD for short… This overdose of the most hallucinogenic drugs launched rock’n’roll into every imaginable excess of psychedelic. There were of course the genre’s ambassadors, such as Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and 13th Floor Elevators, as well as newcomers like the Beatles with Sgt Pepper’s, the Byrds with Eight Miles High and, our point of interest, the Rolling Stones with Their Satanic Majesties Request. While it doesn’t reach the heights of some of the masterpieces of Jagger, Richards and company, this eighth studio album, for which recording was halted by the legal affairs of the band members, remains a fascinating musical UFO. Here again the internal chaos pushed producer Andrew Loog Oldham towards the exit, who was replaced by Glyn Johns and Eddie Kramer. With touches of Mellotron, dulcimer, and tablas, the Stones embark their semantic on unique psychedelic paths, and the result is astounding, for instance on 2,000 Light Years From Home, THE trippiest song of the album. And with She’s A Rainbow, they also manage to give us the inevitable singles they are known for! All in all, this album has aged beautifully and must urgently be re-explored thanks to this 50th-anniversary remastered edition, which offers both stereo and mono versions. © MD/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Recorded between 1968 and 1972, The Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet is a real rock’n’roll feast. One of the biggest feasts in history no doubt! Right from the first few shamanic bars of Sympathy For The Devil, it’s evident that Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were trying to summon demons with their wickedly raw music. Blues, violence, rhythm'n'blues, sex, country, African music, revolt, soul, drugs and lust – there’s nothing missing from this electric frenzy. With its satanic prose, the album is carried by haunted guitars and minimalist rhythms. Here, the blue note either sweats buckets (Parachute Woman) or appears completely stripped down (Prodigal Son and Factory Girl). Rock had never been so poisonous and fascinating (Street Fighting Man). Richards releases bursts of demented guitar riffs while Jagger sings with unprecedented power and sincerity. The Stones would continue to build on this momentum with three other masterpieces: Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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For over 20 years, The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, a multi-media event staged in late 1968 under a circus tent in a north London TV studio, and meant to be shown on the BBC, lay unedited and unseen reportedly because the band was unhappy with its performance. In 1992 director Michael Lindsay-Hogg began editing it, a process that was finally finished in 1996 before the film and soundtrack were released on both CD and DVD. It has now been re-released with a new 4K Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos DVD/Blu-Ray of the film and a soundtrack expanded to 28 tracks, with a new mix in a 192k/24 bit HD restoration. Often dismissed as a goofy, DayGlo relic that reflected the mushy peace and love currents of the moment, this high resolution reissue shows that a serious reassessment of this oddity is long overdue. Because of setups and multiple takes the event dragged on much longer than expected and so the Stones performance was recorded in the wee hours of the morning (Richards has said that the band had to bring in a second audience after wearing out the first). And yet the band's six songs, four coming from the recently released Beggars Banquet, are the electric heart of this collection. In fact it's Jagger, one of the originators of the circus concept, who almost single-handedly carries the day with his energetically deranged performance of "Sympathy for the Devil." Other highlights include a red hot performance by The Who of "A Quick One, While He's Away," (with Keith Moon on fire), Taj Mahal groovin' with guitarist Jesse Ed Davis on "Ain't That A Lot of Love," and John Lennon bantering jabberwocky with Jagger and playing The White Album's"Yer Blues" with Eric Clapton on guitar, Keith Richards on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. A second take of "Yer Blues" is included among the nine unreleased tracks here along with three more Taj Mahal blues numbers, Mozart from pianist Julius Katchen and a rehearsal take of another Beatles tune, "Revolution." Circus is also notable for being Brian Jones' last official performance with the band; he died in July 1969, the first of too many 27-year old rockers to die young. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 8, 1967 | ABKCO Music & Records

When Their Satanic Majesties Request was released on December 8th, 1967 the world of rock’n’roll was swimming in an ocean of lysergic acid diethylamide. LSD for short… This overdose of the most hallucinogenic drugs launched rock’n’roll into every imaginable excess of psychedelic. There were of course the genre’s ambassadors, such as Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and 13th Floor Elevators, as well as newcomers like the Beatles with Sgt Pepper’s, the Byrds with Eight Miles High and, our point of interest, the Rolling Stones with Their Satanic Majesties Request. While it doesn’t reach the heights of some of the masterpieces of Jagger, Richards and company, this eighth studio album, for which recording was halted by the legal affairs of the band members, remains a fascinating musical UFO. Here again the internal chaos pushed producer Andrew Loog Oldham towards the exit, who was replaced by Glyn Johns and Eddie Kramer. With touches of Mellotron, dulcimer, and tablas, the Stones embark their semantic on unique psychedelic paths, and the result is astounding, for instance on 2,000 Light Years From Home, THE trippiest song of the album. And with She’s A Rainbow, they also manage to give us the inevitable singles they are known for! All in all, this album has aged beautifully and must urgently be re-explored thanks to this 50th-anniversary remastered edition, which offers both stereo and mono versions. © MD/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 8, 1967 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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For over 20 years, The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, a multi-media event staged in late 1968 under a circus tent in a north London TV studio, and meant to be shown on the BBC, lay unedited and unseen reportedly because the band was unhappy with its performance. In 1992 director Michael Lindsay-Hogg began editing it, a process that was finally finished in 1996 before the film and soundtrack were released on both CD and DVD. It has now been re-released with a new 4K Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos DVD/Blu-Ray of the film and a soundtrack expanded to 28 tracks, with a new mix in a 192k/24 bit HD restoration. Often dismissed as a goofy, DayGlo relic that reflected the mushy peace and love currents of the moment, this high resolution reissue shows that a serious reassessment of this oddity is long overdue. Because of setups and multiple takes the event dragged on much longer than expected and so the Stones performance was recorded in the wee hours of the morning (Richards has said that the band had to bring in a second audience after wearing out the first). And yet the band's six songs, four coming from the recently released Beggars Banquet, are the electric heart of this collection. In fact it's Jagger, one of the originators of the circus concept, who almost single-handedly carries the day with his energetically deranged performance of "Sympathy for the Devil." Other highlights include a red hot performance by The Who of "A Quick One, While He's Away," (with Keith Moon on fire), Taj Mahal groovin' with guitarist Jesse Ed Davis on "Ain't That A Lot of Love," and John Lennon bantering jabberwocky with Jagger and playing The White Album's"Yer Blues" with Eric Clapton on guitar, Keith Richards on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. A second take of "Yer Blues" is included among the nine unreleased tracks here along with three more Taj Mahal blues numbers, Mozart from pianist Julius Katchen and a rehearsal take of another Beatles tune, "Revolution." Circus is also notable for being Brian Jones' last official performance with the band; he died in July 1969, the first of too many 27-year old rockers to die young. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released November 16, 2018 | ABKCO Music & Records

Recorded between 1968 and 1972, The Rolling Stone’s Beggars Banquet is a real rock’n’roll feast. One of the biggest feasts in history no doubt! Right from the first few shamanic bars of Sympathy For The Devil, it’s evident that Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were trying to summon demons with their wickedly raw music. Blues, violence, rhythm'n'blues, sex, country, African music, revolt, soul, drugs and lust – there’s nothing missing from this electric frenzy. With its satanic prose, the album is carried by haunted guitars and minimalist rhythms. Here, the blue note either sweats buckets (Parachute Woman) or appears completely stripped down (Prodigal Son and Factory Girl). Rock had never been so poisonous and fascinating (Street Fighting Man). Richards releases bursts of demented guitar riffs while Jagger sings with unprecedented power and sincerity. The Stones would continue to build on this momentum with three other masterpieces: Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Exile On Main Street. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 11, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released October 3, 2018 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released April 30, 2019 | ABKCO Music & Records

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Rock - Released November 9, 2018 | ABKCO Music & Records

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The Rolling Stones in the magazine