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Electronic/Dance - Released December 3, 2012 | XL

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Few albums were as eagerly anticipated as The Fat of the Land, the Prodigy's long-awaited follow-up to Music for the Jilted Generation. By the time of its release, the group had two number one British singles with "Firestarter" and "Breathe" and had begun to make inroads in America. The Fat of the Land was touted as the album that would bring electronica/techno to a worldwide audience (Of course, in Britain, the group already had a staggeringly large following that was breathlessly awaiting the album.) The Fat of the Land falls short of masterpiece status, but that isn't because it doesn't deliver. Instead, it delivers exactly what anyone would expect: intense hip-hop-derived rhythms, imaginatively reconstructed samples, and meaningless shouted lyrics from Keith Flint and Maxim. Half of the album does sound quite similar to "Firestarter," especially when Flint is singing. Granted, Liam Howlett is an inventive producer, and he can make empty songs like "Smack My Bitch Up" and "Serial Thrilla" kick with a visceral power, but he is at his best on the funky hip-hop of "Diesel Power" (which is driven by an excellent Kool Keith rap) and "Funky Shit," as well as the mind-bending neo-psychedelia of "Narayan" (featuring guest vocals by Crispian Mills of Kula Shaker) and the blood-curdling cover of L7's "Fuel My Fire," which features vocals by Republica's Saffron. All those guest vocalists mean something -- Howlett is at his best when he's writing for himself or others, not his group's own vocalists. "Firestarter" and all of its rewrites capture the fire of the Prodigy at their peak, and the remaining songs have imagination that give the album weight. The Fat of the Land doesn't have quite enough depth or variety to qualify as a flat-out masterpiece, but what it does have to offer is damn good. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Drum & Bass - Released July 4, 1994 | XL Recordings

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
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The Prodigy's response to the sweeping legislation and crackdown on raves contained in 1994's Criminal Justice Bill is an effective statement of intent. Pure sonic terrorism, Music for the Jilted Generation employs the same rave energy that charged their debut, Experience, up the charts in Britain, but yokes it to a cause other than massive drug intake. Compared to their previous work, the sound is grubbier and less reliant on samples; the effect moved the Prodigy away from the American-influenced rave and acid house of the past and toward a uniquely British vision of breakbeat techno that was increasingly allied to the limey invention of drum'n'bass. As on Experience, there are so many great songs here that first-time listeners would be forgiven for thinking of a greatest-hits compilation instead of a proper studio album. After a short intro, the shattering of panes of glass on "Break & Enter" catapults the album ahead with a propulsive flair. Each of the four singles -- "Voodoo People," "Poison," "No Good (Start the Dance)," and "One Love" -- are excellent, though album tracks like "Speedway" and "Their Law" (with help from Pop Will Eat Itself) don't slip up either. If Experience seemed like an excellent fluke, Music for the Jilted Generation is the album that announced the Prodigy were on the charts to stay. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

"Change? Never. You can evolve, add things, but why would you want to change? What’s the point?" Liam Howlett, the brains behind The Prodigy, was very clear in 2015 upon the release of The Day is My Enemy, the last album from the British group who created a fierce mix of techno, jungle, punk and hip-hop know as big beat at the start of the 90s. This new album confirms that the trio still don’t plan on straying from their path, the path of making infernal noise with the objective of blowing up the stage. Mutant synth gimmicks, motor engine-like noise, brutal bass-lines, punchy intros, thrashing guitars: like all Prodigy albums No Tourists is like running through a blitz. Partly put together in hotel rooms, the album also includes a collaboration with New Jersey punk-rap duo Ho99o9 on the track Fight Fire with Fire, a riot rallying call on which Howlett dives deep into the hardcore. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz

Electronic/Dance - Released July 19, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 4, 2008 | XL

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The Prodigy's response to the sweeping legislation and crackdown on raves contained in 1994's Criminal Justice Bill is an effective statement of intent. Pure sonic terrorism, Music for the Jilted Generation employs the same rave energy that charged their debut, Experience, up the charts in Britain, but yokes it to a cause other than massive drug intake. Compared to their previous work, the sound is grubbier and less reliant on samples; the effect moved the Prodigy away from the American-influenced rave and acid house of the past and toward a uniquely British vision of breakbeat techno that was increasingly allied to the limey invention of drum'n'bass. As on Experience, there are so many great songs here that first-time listeners would be forgiven for thinking of a greatest-hits compilation instead of a proper studio album. After a short intro, the shattering of panes of glass on "Break & Enter" catapults the album ahead with a propulsive flair. Each of the four singles -- "Voodoo People," "Poison," "No Good (Start the Dance)," and "One Love" -- are excellent, though album tracks like "Speedway" and "Their Law" (with help from Pop Will Eat Itself) don't slip up either. If Experience seemed like an excellent fluke, Music for the Jilted Generation is the album that announced the Prodigy were on the charts to stay. ~ John Bush

Electronic/Dance - Released September 21, 1992 | XL Recordings

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 5, 2012 | XL

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Prodigy's third single off the double-platinum Fat of the Land album features their most controversial and confrontational track. Many feminist groups and conservatives have been rubbed the wrong way by the song title "Smack My Bitch Up," but the band has stated in the press that the title shouldn't be taken literally (Prodigy leader Liam Howlett described the title as a phrase that the band uses that means "to hit the concert stage"). The song, however, just happens to be one of Prodigy's finest, featuring swirling rhythms under the repeated title. The track is featured two times on the single, first as a radio edit (similar to the album version), and as a DJ Hype remix (reworked by the well-known U.K. DJ as a speedy jungle track). None other than Liam Howlett does the "Headrock" remix of "Mindfields," and replaces the original's slight Middle Eastern influence with straight-ahead dance beats. But the most interesting track on the "Smack My Bitch Up" single is a collaboration between Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello and Howlett, titled "No Man Army." This non-album dance-rocker features repetitive Morello guitar riffs and fills, often compressed or filtered through a wah-wah pedal. This infectious single is another winner from the most imaginative and original electronic dance group today. ~ Greg Prato
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Electronic/Dance - Released August 31, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Electronic/Dance - Released August 30, 2004 | XL Recordings

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 1, 2002 | XL Recordings

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 27, 2004 | XL

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 3, 2005 | XL Recordings

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 13, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 26, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 22, 2004 | XL

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 8, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 5, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Electronic/Dance - Released October 25, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 11, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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