Similar artists

Albums

$22.99

Country - Released January 1, 2002 | Capitol Nashville

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
With all due respect to the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers, it took the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band until this album to come up with a merger of rock and country music that worked for both sides and everyone involved. The opening number, "The Grand Ole Opry Song," set the tone for the album, showing that this band -- for all of their origins in rock and popular music -- were willing to meet country music on its own terms, rather than as a vehicle for embellishment as rock music. The result, without a false or strained note anywhere among its 37 songs, was an all-star country project that worked (and transcended its country and rock origins), with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band serving as catalyst and intersecting point for all of the talent involved, who gave superbly of themselves. Not only did this album result in exposure to a new and wider audience for the likes of Mother Maybelle Carter, Roy Acuff, Earl Scruggs, Merle Travis, and others, but this was the first real country album that a lot of rock listeners under the age of 30 ever heard. Thus, it opened up pathways and dialogue in all directions, across several generations and cultural barriers; the dialogue between Doc Watson and Merle Travis alone was almost worth the price of admission. ~ Bruce Eder
$32.49
$27.99

Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Nashville

Hi-Res
$37.99
$32.99

Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Nashville

Hi-Res
$21.49

Country - Released January 1, 2014 | CMCapNash (N91)

A three-record set spanning the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's career from its first album in 1967 to 1976, Dirt, Silver and Gold features all of the band's hits, including "Buy for Me the Rain," "Mr. Bojangles," "Battle of New Orleans," and the historic "Will the Circle Be Unbroken." The compilation also showcased many odds and ends (hence the "Dirt" in the title) that blend in nicely with the rest of the selections. If anyone is wondering about the Dirt Band pre-1976, this excellent collection is where they should begin. ~ James Chrispell
$8.99

Country - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Nashville

A couple of years after the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's string of country hits ended, the band returned to its roots to record this appropriately titled collection of original material. Most of the songs are very good, and the sound is refreshingly unadorned with any concessions to the soundalike country mainstream. Because the NDGB was among the many fine artists swept aside by the faceless hat acts and young country babes birthed by the Garth era, Acoustic never found a sizable audience. However, this blend of acoustic guitars, mandolin, dobro, harmonica, accordion, washboard, and beautiful vocal harmonies delivers a bevy of country/folk delights. ~ Jim Newsom
$16.49

Country - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Nashville

The first album issued by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band after they had temporarily disbanded in 1969, this greatly expanded their pop audience, due primarily to the Top 10 hit cover of Jerry Jeff Walker's "Mr. Bojangles" (which actually wasn't a hit until early 1971). The group moved into a more accessible rock-oriented fusion of country, bluegrass, pop, and rock & roll, relying primarily on smartly chosen covers of tunes by the likes of Walker, Mike Nesmith, Randy Newman, and Kenny Loggins. Few bands had incorporated instruments more commonly associated with country and bluegrass, particularly mandolin and banjo, as comfortably into a rock setting prior to this release, and their well-crafted harmonies help put the songs over for those not-steeped-in backwoods sounds. It was an extremely diverse program for a country-rock album, too, moving from rustic instrumentals and snippets of tapes of elderly musicians performing rural Americana to the Buddy Holly cover "Rave On." The group were actually at their best, though, when doing softer, melodic pop tunes. "Mr. Bojangles" was a deserved huge success in that regard, but Nesmith's "Some of Shelley's Blues" and Loggins' "House at Pooh Corner" were almost as catchy and appealing. ~ Richie Unterberger
$7.49

Country - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Nashville

The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's first pure studio recording since Will the Circle Be Unbroken, Dream is another very different earful sort of psychedelic country/bluegrass. The band is joined by Linda Ronstadt, Leon Russell, and actor Gary Busey (as "Teddy Jack Eddy," and on drums). The sound is more varied than on previous albums, with a harder electric country feel on "Bayou Jubilee," which segues directly into the bluegrass instrumental "Sally Was a Goodun." Ronstadt does a great job singing "Hey Good Lookin'," but mostly it's the Dirt Band singing, including a superb rendition of "(All I Have to Do Is) Dream." The group had previously released a fun live rendition of Jimmie Driftwood's "The Battle of New Orleans," and they cover it here in a somewhat funkier studio version. John McEuen also offers a taste of some of the sounds he'd later explore more fully on his solo releases with "Classical Banjo I/Malaguena/Classical Banjo II." They offer a non-country instrumental, "Sleeping on the Beach," which could have come from a '50s mood instrumental album -- of course, they follow it up with William McEuen's carnival music-inspired "Santa Monica Pier," which segues into the gorgeous lost single "Ripplin' Waters," by Jim Ibbotson, one of two hits that should have been off this album (the other is Ken Edwards' "Mother of Love"). The disc ends with William McEuen's wind harp instrumental and a music-box piece called "Symphonion Montage." ~ Bruce Eder
$25.49

Country - Released September 29, 2017 | CMCapNash (N91)

$18.99

Country - Released January 1, 2002 | Capitol Nashville

$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 1967 | Capitol Nashville

$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 1974 | Capitol Nashville

In many ways, the mixed collection of live and studio recordings on Stars & Stripes Forever accomplished for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and rock music what Sweetheart of the Rodeo failed to do for or with the Byrds, showing the rock band plunging deeply into country music. Two years in the making, it incorporated new studio cuts and live tracks recorded at five concerts over a two-year period, as well as interview material with guest fiddle player Vassar Clements. The mix works better than just about any genuine country (as opposed to country-rock) effort ever done by a rock band, mostly because the band was so careful in their recording and editing, and they gave themselves time to get this stuff just the way they wanted it. Beyond the excellent concert renditions of "Mr. Bojangles" or "The Battle of New Orleans" (which became a single in the wake of this album), and covers of Hank Williams songs and numerous traditional tunes, listeners found they'd walked in on something very deep and profound, tapping into a special creative process. Whatever the reason, this album gave the public more than its money's worth and was a success, charting higher than any other record the group ever released. It still packs lots of power. ~ Bruce Eder

Country - Released April 18, 2016 | Westmill

Download not available
$14.99
$12.99

Country - Released September 30, 2016 | NGDB Records

Hi-Res
Friends always meant something special to the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band -- their 1972 breakthrough, Will the Circle Be Unbroken, was filled with them -- so it only makes sense that the group rounded up a bunch of pals for a 50th anniversary concert held at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium on September 14, 2015. Released a year later, Circlin' Back: Celebrating 50 Years does indeed play like a celebration. Revisiting an equal portion of hits and traditional tunes, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band sound as deep and wise as the Nashville veterans did when they guested on Will the Circle Be Unbroken, but the nice thing about the Circlin' Back concert is that it takes into account the smoother hits the band had in the '80s: Rodney Crowell and Alison Krauss sit in on "An American Dream" and Jimmy Ibbotson plays on "Fishin' in the Dark." Here, they're presented in stripped-down arrangements that nevertheless echo the soft rock gloss of the hit singles, and when combined with rollicking bluegrass, rustic folk, and straight-ahead country, it results in a full portrait of what the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band is all about. Better still, Circlin' Back is just a good time: as John Prine, Vince Gill, Sam Bush, Jackson Browne, and Jerry Jeff Walker take the stage, the entire thing feels like a party -- which, of course, is what it was. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Country - Released September 30, 2016 | NGDB Records

$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | CMCapNash (N91)

$8.99

Country - Released January 1, 1989 | Geffen*

$7.49

Country - Released January 1, 1991 | Capitol Nashville

Recorded during three shows at the Red Deer Fine Arts Center in Alberta, Canada, in 1991, Live Two Five contains a healthy portion of the band's significant hit output. Consisting mostly of faithful, slightly extended versions of their classic laid-back country-rock classics, only a meandering 11-minute "Ripplin' Waters" and a completely unnecessary harmonica instrumental on "Harpo" are significant low points. Of course, many of the songs eventually descend into band members pandering for applause and crowd sing-alongs, so this is aimed at the more avid fan. Still, there is more than enough to keep the casual fan interested. ~ Matt Fink
$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 1979 | Capitol Nashville

Any Nitty Gritty Dirt Band fan who thought the smooth soft rock of 1978's The Dirt Band was a fluke was proven wrong by the following year's American Dream, which took the template of its predecessor and improved it with a streamlined production and some very strong material. Chief among these, of course, was the title song, a winningly polished take on Rodney Crowell's clever "American Dream" that became a hit, climbing all the way to 13 on the pop charts and thereby establishing the band in the public's eyes as the soft rock act they'd become. It's a brilliant single, one of the best Californian soft rock songs of its era, and American Dream the album delivers at least on the level of sound -- sonically, it's a sleek and appealing collection of mid-tempo pop songs, ballads, and lazy jams. It's the latter that hurt the momentum of the album; although the instrumental "Jas'moon" works better than "White Russian" on The Dirt Band, there are some really silly good-time numbers -- "New Orleans," "Happy Feet" -- that deflate the mellow vibe of the record (as does the reggae-fied cover of "Wolverton Mountain" that closes the LP on a sour note). Though these are stumbles, they don't hurt the record, since the rest of American Dream glides by on its smooth surfaces -- all electric pianos, slick guitars, saxophones, and glistening polish -- and songs as light but appealing as "In Her Eyes," "Take Me Back," "Dance the Night Away," "Do You Feel the Way That I Do," and "What's on Your Mind." This won't win over the fans lost on The Dirt Band -- it would be some time before they returned to the progressive country that made their reputation -- but this is another small late-'70s soft rock gem. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$11.49

Country - Released January 1, 1980 | Capitol Nashville

Firmly entrenched in the mellow SoCal groove they established since truncating their name, the Dirt Band continued to roll softly on "Make a Little Magic," their 1980 follow-up to their modest 1979 hit "An American Dream." Thanks to the Rodney Crowell-penned title track, "An American Dream" gave the Dirt Band their first single to flirt with the Top Ten since "Mr. Bojangles," as "An American Dream" peaked at 13, but "Make a Little Magic" actually wound up charting higher than its predecessor, reaching 62 where Dream went to 76. "Make a Little Magic" followed the template of the sweet, soft "American Dream" to a T, thanks in part to backing vocals from Nicolette Larson, who also reappears on "Do It! (Party Lights)," another minor soft rock gem. About half of Make a Little Magic easily fits within the parameters of super-slick soft rock but there are times that the Dirt Band pushes a little harder, harnessing a bit of an arena rock edge here and there, notably on the guitar-heavy "Badlands" (not a Springsteen cover), "Anxious Heart" and "High School Yearbook" an agreeably silly subversion of rah-rah nostalgia that finds cheerleaders turning into call girls while "macho Johnny" starts wearing little sister's clothes "wrapped up in a world of pantyhose/but he's doing what he wants to." While the intent of the increased energy is appreciated -- as is the delicate acoustic closer "Mullen's Farewell to America," a passing nod to their more progressive beginnings -- the album is at its best when things are a little bit softer, whether it's on that pair of Larson-graced pop tunes or the lightly skipping "Too Good to Be True," even if occasionally the group seems just a bit too stuck in their soft groove, as they do on "Leigh Anne." ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$13.99

Country - Released January 1, 1968 | Capitol Nashville

This, the group's third album release, was actually an odds-and-sods type compilation of leftover tracks and singles that formed a respectable 10-song 30-minute plus LP. As a sign of just how strong the band was, it still represented a step forward from their second album, and is one of the great unknown albums of 1968. ~ Bruce Eder