Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 1994 | Geffen*

The Mavericks fully hit their stride with their third album, 1994's What a Crying Shame, in which the band's blend of rootsy country and vintage pop sounds finally found the balance they'd been searching for. While producer Don Cook gave the band a significantly glossier sound than that of their first two albums, with a hefty number of guest musicians (and guest songwriters) on board, remarkably enough the Mavericks' personality wasn't subsumed in the process; if anything, the high-priced help seemed to have prodded the boys into playing at the top of their game. Raul Malo's keening tenor gets a superb workout on "I Should Have Been True" and the title cut (the latter of which boasts a guitar hook Roger McGuinn would have been proud to come up with), while "Pretend" and "There Goes My Heart" are honky tonk floor-fillers of the first order. Robert Reynolds and Paul Deakin are a rhythm section who can give these songs the nervy drive of a rock band without betraying the Mavericks' country leanings, and they give the covers of "All That Heaven Will Allow" and "O What a Thrill" a taut foundation most contemporary Nashville acts lack. Truth to tell, What a Crying Shame doesn't have a single dud track, and offers encouraging proof that it's still possible to make an engaging and idiosyncratic country album while signed to the Nashville division of a major label...and the best news is, the band managed to turn that accomplishment into a hat trick over the next few years. ~ Mark Deming
CD$17.99

Country - Released January 1, 1995 | Geffen*

CD$8.99

Country - Released January 1, 1998 | MCA Nashville

As their career progresses, the Mavericks are becoming more of a showcase for vocalist/frontman Raul Malo, both for better and for worse. They may be losing their band identity, but that may have been inevitable, considering that Malo is such a gifted, powerful musician. He is the driving force behind all of the group's stylistic fusions, their blend of honky tonk with country-rock, classic rock & roll, pop, and Latin. On Music for All Occasions, the stylistic blends sounded a little gimmicky, but the band sounds revitalized on Trampoline -- even the vaudevillian "Dolores" rings as true as the shuffling, cha-cha "I Should Know." If anything, the album is the least "country" album the Mavericks have ever done, but that's primarily because all of their influences have blended seamlessly together, creating an original, altogether intoxicating sound. Furthermore, they're not simply surface -- Malo's songs are clever constructions, ranking among the most imaginative roots songwriting of the '90s. His writing, combined with his band's musical panache, makes Trampoline a ride worth taking. ~ Thom Owens
CD$25.49

Country - Released August 21, 2006 | MCA Nashville

CD$8.99

Country - Released January 1, 2001 | MCA Nashville

One of the more current groups to have a 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection, the Mavericks' volume in the best-of series isn't quite as comprehensive as their best retrospective, Best of the Mavericks. However, this collection does provide an ample amount of their definitive tracks, including "What a Crying Shame," "There Goes My Heart," and "Dance the Night Away." While Best of the Mavericks might still be the preferable best-of, The Millennium Collection: The Best of the Mavericks does a better-than-average job of collecting their most popular singles. ~ Heather Phares
CD$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2004 | MCA Nashville

The Mavericks are one of those bands that inspire such fierce loyalty in fans that any attempt at a "Definitive Collection" that does not contain all of their recordings will be grounds for fiery, impassioned debate. This set from Universal Chronicles goes as far as any single disc can go in attempting to capture the wildly diverse, raucous, and soulful sound of a band that succeeded in spite, not because, of finicky trends in country music. Indeed, the Mavericks embody all of the best elements in country and early rock & roll, and all of their faces are here. All four of the band's MCA albums are represented, as is Mercury Nashville's Super Colossal Smash Hits of the '90s, which was a compilation but also contained six new tracks. And while The Definitive Collection gets some marks for its inclusion of every charting single as well as select album tracks, the rarities are what sets it apart. First is the inclusion of the Nick Lowe-produced version of the Lorenz Hart tune "Blue Moon" from the Apollo 13 soundtrack, and there are also two cuts never before issued in the U.S., "I Don't Care (If You Don't Love Me Anymore)" together with the live "Rancho Grande" from the 1998 Canadian mini-album It's Now! It's Live! With 20 tracks total, great notes by Rich Kienzle, and remastered sound, this is solid compilation that introduces the band to initiates and provides over an hour of listening pleasure for hardcore devotees. ~ Thom Jurek
CD$10.49

Country - Released February 20, 2012 | Sanctuary Records

The Mavericks are talented enough to do any number of things with their music, which has been just a bit problematic for them since their breakthrough with 1994's What a Crying Shame, as they shuffle back and forth between country, sophisticated pop, and Latin accents in the studio without sounding as if they've found a permanent home with any of them. But they can play pretty much anything they set their minds to and make it work, and Raul Malo's glorious pipes are always a joy to hear, and on this live album their ambitious eclecticism works strongly in their favor. Live in Austin Texas finds an augmented version of the Mavericks (complete with horn section) pulling out all the stops for a vocally enthusiastic audience, and here they jump from one style to another with a surefooted abandon, sounding confident and enthusiastic at every turn. Malo is front and center on this performances, as well he should be, but his partners Robert Reynolds (on bass and guitar), Paul Deakin (drums and percussion), and Eddie Perez (guitars) give the singer as good as they get, and while this set list isn't exactly full of surprises, one spin reveals these guys are born showmen who approach each song with equal shares of passion and chops. Malo in particular sounds like he's having one hell of a good time at this show, and the audience is with him all the way -- and from the sound of this show, you sure can't blame 'em. Wherever they choose to go, the truly great Mavericks have talent as wide as their vision, and Live in Austin Texas captures them firing on all cylinders. If you can't find something on this album to groove to, maybe you ought not to bother with this whole music thing in the first place. ~ Mark Deming
CD$12.99

Country - Released September 1, 2016 | Sanctuary Records

CD$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Although they first broke into the limelight marketed as a country act in the 1990s, Miami's Mavericks, led by the soaring, Roy Orbison-like vocals of singer Raul Malo, and with a sound that blended country elements with Tex-Mex, Latin, and Cuban touches, along with pure pop, proved to be a little too diverse (OK, a lot diverse) for the narrow confines of Nashville's version of commercial country. The band parted ways as the decade closed, reunited for a single album in 2003, then split up again while Malo, always the focal point and the main songwriter in the group, went on to release several solo albums that explored different genre avenues before the Mavericks reunited once more in 2011. This album, In Time, is the result, and it's a further step away from anything resembling a mainstream country release, incorporating not only the Tex-Mex and Cuban influences the band was known for, but also the rhythms of polkas, tangos, and all manner of approaches, making them closer to a band like Los Lobos than to Tim McGraw or Jason Aldean, or whoever passes for the face of country music these days. Malo co-produced this set (with Niko Bolas), and he wrote or co-wrote all of the songs here, and his versatile and incredible vocals are, as they should be, the center of everything. Tracks like the floating shuffle "Back in Your Arms Again," the pop gem "Born to Be Blue," the Roy Orbison-like "That's Not My Name," and the powerful and relentless "(Call Me) When You Get to Heaven" (a stunning, passionate, and wrenching ballad that builds and rises to a honest-to-goodness bolero crescendo) prove that neither Malo nor the rest of the bandmembers have lost nary an inch during the layoff, and if anything, have grown much more explorative and adventurous. To say this album is a return to form wouldn't be quite correct. It's an extension of it. ~ Steve Leggett
CD$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 1999 | Mercury Nashville

The Mavericks were one of the most acclaimed country bands of the '90s and, for a brief moment, they were among the most popular. With their third album, What a Crying Shame, they were at the zenith of their creative powers, and they were rewarded with great reviews and sales. They maintained a high level of creativity with its two follow-ups, 1995's Music for All Occasions and 1998's Trampoline, but their audience shrank somewhat, turning into a cult following much like Lyle Lovett's -- they were popular, going gold with their new albums, but they didn't have crossover hits. That was a crying shame, because as the 1999 singles collection Super Colossal Smash Hits of the 90's: The Best of the Mavericks proves, they kept a high level of quality. That doesn't mean that Super Colossal is a perfect collection, however. Like most '90s hits compilations, it's baited with unreleased material. Usually, that means there's just one or two new cuts. This time, there are no less than four new tracks, which means there are only eight hits on the record. The new material -- including covers of "Here Comes My Baby" and "Think of Me (When You're Lonely)" -- isn't bad, and the Tex-Mex-flavored "Pizziricco," in particular, is pretty good, but the fact that a quarter of the album is devoted to new material means that there's a lot of good stuff missing here. Still, it's a good roundup of the best of the best, and a nice reminder to casual fans who haven't paid attention since What a Crying Shame that the Mavericks have a lot more to offer. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$7.49

Country - Released January 1, 2012 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

CD$7.49

Country - Released January 1, 1992 | Geffen*

The Mavericks made their major-label debut with their second album, 1992's From Hell to Paradise, and while co-producer Steve Fishell added a lot more gloss than the band could summon up on their first independently released disc (not all of which works in their favor), overall this set sounds noticeably stronger and more sure-footed than the Mavericks did their first time at bat. The slicker sound certainly makes the most of Paul Deakin's sharp drumming and Robert Reynolds' rock-solid bass, and vocalist Raul Malo gained plenty of control and confidence this time out, with his clear, flexible tenor shining bright on every track, especially the plaintive "This Broken Heart" and the dramatic title song. Between the Farfisa-flavored pop of "I Got You," the rockabilly-accented locomotive charge of "End of the Line," and the Latin accents of "From Hell to Paradise," the broad stylistic range of the group's best work was beginning to make itself felt, as well as intelligent and challenging lyrical themes which set them apart from the average bunch of Nashville cats (significantly, From Hell to Paradise was recorded in that noted country music Mecca of Miami, FL). A few tunes are a bit more formulaic than one might hope for, and while the Hank Williams and Buck Owens covers are fun (and show good taste), they aren't especially enlightening. But there's enough good stuff on From Hell to Paradise to confirm the musical promise of the Mavericks' first album, and pave the way for their breakthrough with What a Crying Shame. ~ Mark Deming
CD$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 1990 | Hip-O (UC)

CD$7.99

Country - Released November 1, 2019 | Mono Mundo Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2015 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Few bands have gotten as far in Nashville while displaying little if any concern for the conventions of Music City record making as the Mavericks, and since they reunited in 2012, they seem to realize there isn't much of a place for them on the radio in a market saturated by bro-country, so they've followed their own muse, which has served them quite well in the past. 2015's Mono doesn't sound like a country album, but it sure sounds like the Mavericks, dipping into a variety of different styles with soul, smarts, and a sense of fun while Raul Malo's glorious voice sweeps over it all. As the title suggests, Mono was recorded and mixed in single-channel audio, which gives the album a richly saturated sound that suits the Mavericks' retro moods, and from the old-school rock & roll shuffle of "Stories We Could Tell" and the sweet romantic mood of "Let It Rain (On Me)" to the potent Latin rhythms of "What You Do to Me" and the first-generation ska of "Summertime (When I'm with You)," this music feels like it was meant to be played in a dancehall with a crowd of Saturday night revelers whooping it up or slow dancing to the fine sounds. Malo and his bandmates -- Eddie Perez on guitar, Jerry Dale McFadden on keyboards, and Paul Deakin on drums -- are blessed with imagination, chops, and a sure sense of what feels right, and Mono is the work of a band just smart enough that sometimes the body is just as important as the frontal lobes. The Mavericks understand how to satisfy both, and Mono is an album that will keep you dancing to its beats and smiling to its wit and romance 'til the break of dawn. ~ Mark Deming
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Country - Released August 30, 2019 | Mono Mundo Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Country - Released September 20, 2019 | Mono Mundo Recordings

Hi-Res
CD$2.49

Country - Released September 1, 2016 | Sanctuary Records

CD$8.99

Country - Released October 18, 2019 | Mono Mundo Recordings

CD$8.99

Country - Released October 4, 2019 | Mono Mundo Recordings