Similar artists

Albums

$17.49
$15.49

Soul - Released July 20, 2018 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Thanks to Ego Death, their third album from 2015, The Internet has reached a wider audience… And yet, Purple Naked Ladies released in 2011 and Feel Good, released two years later, had already highlighted the soulful voice of their female singer Syd Tha Kyd and the rather sophisticated and mostly minimalist sounds from Matt Martians, both members of the Odd Future collective. The Internet was tackling different sections of the soul music, with a preference for 90s nu soul, sometimes veering toward R&B or even hip-hop. Three years later, the orgy of sensual beats that are most of all as languorous as ever is still on the menu of their fourth opus, Hive Mind. In its DNA, The Internet is viscerally chill and this chill & laid back philosophy even becomes here an ever more mastered trademark. A sound and an attitude that mean that none of the thirteen songs from the album will be obvious to your ears on the first listen. With its dreamy melodies, Hive Mind, like all the deep works, is only understood with time. It’s a luxury in 2018 to take your time… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$17.49
$14.99

R&B/Soul - Released June 26, 2015 | Odd Future

Hi-Res
Matt Martians' design for Ego Death asserts that the Internet, which the producer co-pilots with singer/songwriter and producer/engineer Sydney Bennett, should be considered a band, not a duo. The names of the additional four -- keyboardist Jameel Bruner, guitarist Steve Lacy, bassist Patrick Paige II, and drummer Christopher Allan Smith -- along with those of numerous associates and guest artists, appear throughout the credits of the Internet's third and best album. While part of the appeal of Purple Naked Ladies and Feel Good was in their off-the-cuff and unassuming qualities, some of the songs verged on sketches and happenstance tangents that merely evoked a chemically enhanced and/or intimate mood. The majority of Ego Death is tighter. Bennett has refined her songwriting without reducing the candid approach that colors her past compositions. Additionally, the tangents are fewer and more substantive. It doesn't pick up where Feel Good left off. Instead of opening with a free-flowing mood-setter, the album starts with Bennett's voice barely above a whisper, declaring "Now she wanna fuck with me," daydreaming about escape, in tandem with trudging bass and lapping percussion. Much of what follows is similarly direct, or at least as concise. "Girl," co-produced by Bruner and Kaytranada, is a dimly lit gem of a ballad, a simple love song with loping bass and fluttering synthesizer evoking heartache with as much resonance as Bennett's words. Other nuanced, low-key standouts sound like they started as informal jam sessions and were shaped into near perfection. In the cloud surfing, James Fauntleroy-assisted "For the World," Bennett's consciousness is so altered that she blissfully slurs to a lover that she's willing to kill for her, then dismisses the thought with "We're chillin' instead, give me a kiss." Bennett's sharp pen and ability to convey a mix of emotions are also in top form in "Under Control," where she impels a relationship with a lot of conviction and a little anxiety. One of the best noncommercial R&B albums of 2015, Ego Death is perfectly timed, in sync with -- and distinct from -- other standout releases connected to the thriving L.A. community, including Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp a Butterfly, Kamasi Washington's The Epic, Miguel's WILDHEART, and Bilal's Adrian Younge-produced In Another Life. ~ Andy Kellman
$14.99

R&B/Soul - Released September 20, 2013 | Odd Future

Like they were Sade for the Odd Future crowd or Amp Fiddler with more of an indie spin, the Internet (vocalist Syd the Kyd and producer Matt Martians) coast and coo their way across a more mature batch of neo-soul on their sophomore album, the aptly titled Feel Good. The music is an alluring mix of lazy and lush with just enough groove to keep things from fading into the background. Kyd is now undeniably the group's secret ingredient. She's able to keep her edgy stance when dipping into emotions and observations others aren't bold enough to tackle, while still playing it earnest when it comes to everyday woes, like how "Sunset" frets about what to wear on a sunny day. "I've got nothing to wear" might sound trite, but in Syd's hands, it's representative of a frustratingly unsettled life where nothing seems to sort; other highlights aren't so layered, though, as "You Don't Even Know" whispers sweet, simple nothings to its object of affection and comes off as entirely sincere. When coupled with releases from fellow crew member Frank Ocean, the Internet's true soul means OFWGKTA-associated releases can be seen as outlandish when it comes to hip-hop, and honest when it comes to R&B, so go ahead and give skateboarding Wolf Packers access to this one, because they might start asking questions about Love Deluxe, Massive Attack, and Terry Callier while on a quest for music of equal cool and caliber. ~ David Jeffries
$15.49

R&B/Soul - Released December 19, 2011 | Odd Future

As the Internet released their debut album digitally at the end of 2011, this dreamy, dark duo benefitted from their relationship with the controversial hip-hop crew Odd Future, just on mentions in the press. It's beneficial, as Purple Naked Ladies is actually a diminutive and often humble album that easily drifts into the background, even with a flippant treatment of "Cocaine" (here, a metaphor for hot sex rather than a life-ruining drug) and song titles like "Violet Nude Women" or "C*nt." Think Portishead, '80s, atmospheric Michael Mann soundtracks, sexy loft music, neo-neo-soul, and Georgia Ann Muldrow all mixed together for a new brand of trip-hop that really lives up to that genre's title. Vocalist/rapper Syd the Kyd is the perfect Odd Future siren, sounding breathy, poetic, and even caustic when she needs to, capturing the black widow spirit on the enchanting kiss-off "Web of Me," and sounding like a stoned kind of elegant on the futuristic "Fastlane." The polished and humble creations from producer Matt Martians suggest he's the Odd Future affiliate most likely to score a car commercial, but as slick and instantly gratifying as his constructions are, they're just as deep, pulling influence from everything from Timbaland to Cornelius, from Art of Noise to Blue Note. Sounds delicious, but before considering the album as a date night soundtrack, consider the Kyd's ability to deliver depravity in a Julie London style, and that the manic main character of "She Dgaf" shaves off all her hair to find freedom from "the struggles she was raised with." Still, these damaged goods and broken people are layered and their situations are worldly, things the Internet's cohorts don't often offer. Turns out Odd Future benefits greatly from this duo anchoring their wild universe, as Purple Naked Ladies is one of the collective's more sensual and sensible releases to date. File them between MellowHype and Frank Ocean, or better yet, consider this purposeful act on their own. ~ David Jeffries

Soul - Released April 27, 2018 | Columbia

Download not available

R&B/Soul - Released June 25, 2015 | Odd Future

Download not available

R&B/Soul - Released September 10, 2013 | Odd Future

Download not available

Soul - Released July 13, 2018 | Columbia

Download not available
$2.99

Pop/Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Odd Future

Soul - Released May 30, 2018 | Columbia

Download not available

Soul - Released May 11, 2018 | Columbia

Download not available
$7.99

R&B/Soul - Released November 8, 2011 | Odd Future

News feed Prev. Next

Artist

The Internet in the magazine