Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1985 | London Music Stream - Because Music

From
CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1998 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Originally released in 1998, Time Was Gigantic... When We Were Kids was one of Vini Reilly's more standout Durutti Column albums after leaving Factory Records, and one in what would become an ever-growing discography. Leaning on the modern composer post-classical tones of some of his other '90s work, the album also took on a particularly 4AD brand of ethereality, due in part to guest vocals by Eley Rudge on songs like "My Last Kiss." Production duties and some songwriting were handled by longtime Durutti Column collaborator Keir Stewart. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Rock - Released May 31, 2006 | Artful Records

From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 4, 2008 | LTM Recordings

This release is comprised of studio recordings of pieces performed as live accompaniment for Treatise on the Steppenwolf, a 2003 theatrical adaptation of Hermann Hesse's 1927 novel, Steppenwolf. The production was staged by Twelve Stars, a Glasgow-based company, whose work often explores the experimental intersections of music and theater. Twelve Stars' interest in the dramatic possibilities of music, like their connection with Vini Reilly, was not coincidental: the project's artistic directors, Gerard McInulty and Carolyn Allen, were members of the Wake, erstwhile Factory labelmates of the Durutti Column. Reilly's soundtrack displays his familiar eclecticism, as unaccompanied ethereal guitar kaleidoscopes ("The Title on the Cover") sit comfortably alongside more percussion-driven material, occasionally infused with electronic dance beats ("A Wolf of the Steppes"). Although Reilly sings on one track (something his late manager, Tony Wilson, always discouraged), the most compelling numbers integrate others' vocals sampled from pop and opera, sometimes blending the two within the same track: "Interlude," "Magic Theatre," and "Divided" are sublime examples. Two live segments are also included. One of these ("Lullaby") incorporates a monologue spoken by Carolyn Allen, giving some insight into the way music and the dramatic text worked together in the original theatrical context. Durutti Column fans will recognize many of these tracks: "Mello" was first heard on 2001's Rebellion; versions of "Stupid Steppenwolf" and "A Beautiful Thought" feature on Someone Else's Party (2003) as "Woman" and "Drinking Time," respectively (the latter also appearing on 1998's Time Was Gigantic...When We Were Kids as "Drinking Song"); and "Harry Dreams the Dream" was reincarnated as "Lullaby 4 Nina" on Tempus Fugit (2004). Given this crossover with Reilly's other releases and given that this music was intended as one component of a broader artistic spectacle, Treatise on the Steppenwolf isn't a stand-alone Durutti Column album. However, that's not to deny the quality of the material presented here. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Rock - Released March 2, 2009 | Artful Records

From
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 18, 2016 | Durutti

From
CD$9.99

Rock - Released August 16, 2003 | Reachout International Records, Inc.

This is the CD reissue of Live at the Bottom Line New York, which was originally released on cassette in 1987 and is presented here with one bonus track added and tape hiss subtracted. The Durutti Column is really just guitarist Vini Reilly, but for this performance he is helped out by violist John Metcalfe and percussionist Bruce Mitchell. Reilly's forte is the sweet-toned, slowly evolving instrumental. The aptly named "Arpeggiator" makes as good an introduction to his art as any; it's built on a repeating cascade of guitar arpeggios around which the drums beat politely while the viola slithers snakily in the background. Other tracks, such as "Our Lady of the Angels" and "Miss Haynes," make more extensive use of the delay pedal, to sometimes haunting and always lovely effect. Music this repetitive shouldn't be as consistently interesting as Reilly's is, and the fact that he can pull it off is a credit to his impressive taste and musicianship. His singing, however, is a credit to neither, and it mars the otherwise very pleasant "Missing Boy," "U.S.P." (the CD bonus track) and "Tomorrow." Recommended anyway. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 2, 2008 | LTM Recordings

Part of LTM's early-2008 reissue series of a slew of Durutti Column releases that had originally appeared on Crepuscule, Live in Bruxelles was the sole "new" release, though as the title indicates it's actually an archival tape seeing official light for the first time. Taken from a radio soundboard recording done for broadcast, the set is a mix of tracks from The Return of the Durutti Column, the then-unreleased LC, and various singles and one-offs, including the highly obscure, somewhat unsettling physicality-of-romance portrait "Stains (Useless Body)." Compared to the almost preternaturally clean atmospheres of the studio recordings at the time, Live in Bruxelles is rougher around the edges, not just simply because of the recording quality (fair but not pristine) and the mix, which often foregrounds Bruce Mitchell's drums. It's hearing those drums that gives the disc part of its impact, though -- having just recently begun to work with Vini Reilly, you get a sense that he's still testing out the feeling of the partnership to the full, and moments like the breakdown toward the end of "Sketch for Dawn" and the various mini-solos throughout "Jacqueline" show both what a remarkable drummer he is and how well he slotted in with Reilly's own muse. Reilly himself shines as expected; while his singing is much more direct and sharp given the mix, as can especially be heard on a stellar take on "The Missing Boy," as ever it's still a voice notable more for absence rather than presence, translating most of his feelings into his trademark fluid guitar runs and deceptively calm melodies. (There's one notable exception to this via some crazy soloing on "Self Portrait," which almost comes out of nowhere.) An enjoyable bonus appears at the end with the inclusion of an interview done just after the performance, where Reilly thoughtfully answers various, if sometimes muffled, questions about his work, including some thoughts on the balance between experimentalism and accessibility he found himself aiming for (which in many ways remains true through the present day), as well as a calmly stated but fierce denunciation of the venue's PA system he's just performed with. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
From
CD$5.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2009 | Artful

From
CD$9.99

Rock - Released April 2, 2007 | Durutti

From
CD$14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2015 | Durutti