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LC

Pop - Released June 19, 1999 | Rhino

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After some abortive collaborations, Reilly hooked up with a regular drummer, talented fellow Mancunian Bruce Mitchell, to create LC, Durutti's second full release. Self-produced by Reilly but bearing the unmistakable hints of his earlier work with Martin Hannett, LC, named after a bit of Italian graffiti, extends Reilly's lovely talents ever further, resulting in a new set of evocative, carefully played and performed excursions on electric guitar. Mitchell's crisp but never overly dominant drumming actually starts the record off via "Sketch for Dawn I," added to by a simply captivating low series of notes from Reilly that builds into a softly triumphant melodic surge, repeating a core motif again and again. His piano playing adds a perfect counterpart, while the final touch are his vocals -- low speak-singing that sounds utterly appropriate in context, mixed low and capturing the emotional flavor at play via delivery rather than lyrical content. As great as Return is, this is perhaps even better, signaling a full flowering of Reilly's talents throughout the album. Mitchell proves him time and again to be in perfect sync with Reilly, adding gentle brio and understated variation to the latter's compositions. Nowhere is this more apparent than on "The Missing Boy," the album's unquestioned highlight. Written in memory of Ian Curtis of Joy Division, on it Mitchell adds quick, sudden hits contrasting against the low, tense atmosphere of the song, while fragile piano notes and Reilly's own regret-tinged, yearning vocals complete the picture. For all the implicit melancholy in Durutti's work, there's a surprising amount of life and energy throughout -- "Jaqueline" is perhaps the standout, with a great central melody surrounded by the expected Reilly elaborations and additions in the breaks. As with the rest of Durutti's mid-'90s reissues, the expanded version of LC appears full to the brim with intriguing bonus tracks galore. The first three capture an abortive collaboration with another Manc drummer, funk performer Donald Johnson. A contribution to a holiday album, "One Christmas for Your Thoughts," finds Reilly back with drum machines, while the very first Reilly/Mitchell collaborations, "Danny" and "Enigma," round out this excellent release. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Less of an intentionally confusing title than might be thought, Reilly for all intents and purposes is Durutti no matter the changes through the years -- Vini Reilly does signal another new phase of the band's work, moving into a full embrace of technological possibilities via an Akai sampler. With Reilly and Mitchell joined by a slew of guests -- Swing Out Sister keyboardist Andy Connell; singers Pol, Rob Gray, and Liu Sola; and even former member John Metcalfe on the epic surge "Finding the Sea" -- Durutti this time around pursued the organic/machine combination to even more successful conclusions than on The Guitar. Reilly's singing has often come in for criticism (unwarranted, really, considering how his soft approach effortlessly suits the general atmosphere of Durutti's work), so the slew of sampled and borrowed snippets from other vocalists and musicians that pepper the album makes for an intriguing change. "Love No More," the album opener, shows how the approach can work, with acoustic guitar to the fore and echoed, truly haunting snippets of what sound like soul and opera singers wafting through the mix. Another full-on highlight is "Otis," with Pol's live singing and Connell's keyboards combining with a brisk synth loop, building Mitchell drums, an astonishing, uplifting Reilly guitar line, and the legendary singer Mr. Redding himself in a combination that needs to be heard. Mitchell's overall work on percussion is less prominent than before but still present, while Reilly's guitar efforts are again simply wonderful, further testing new approaches on both acoustic and electric that call to mind everyone from John Fahey to Bootsy Collins. If that last comparison seems strange, give the loud and funky "People's Pleasure Park" a listen, then marvel at how Sola's lovely singing and Reilly's further guitar runs transform it yet again. The 1996 reissue is one of the most comprehensive of the series, including not merely two more tracks recorded around that time but selections from Sporadic Recordings. Given by Reilly to a friend to release, as Factory otherwise couldn't easily fit it into its own schedule, it's a generally more stripped-down affair. The six numbers here include a variety of winners like the upbeat, appropriately titled "Real Drums -- Real Drummer" and the Pat Nevin/football tribute "Shirt No. 7." ~ Ned Raggett
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

More debut albums should be so amusingly perverse with its titles -- and there's the original vinyl sleeve, which consisted of sandpaper precisely so it would damage everything next to it in one's collection. Released in the glow of post-punk fervor in late-'70s Manchester, one would think Return would consist of loud, aggressive sheet-metal feedback, but that's not the way Vini Reilly works. With heavy involvement from producer Martin Hannett, who created all the synth pieces on the record as well as producing it, Reilly on Return made a quietly stunning debut, as influential down the road as his labelmates in Joy Division's effort with Unknown Pleasures. Eschewing formal "rock" composition and delivery -- the album was entirely instrumental, favoring delicacy and understated invention instead of singalong brashness -- Reilly made his mark as the most unique, distinct guitarist from Britain since Bert Jansch. Embracing electric guitar's possibilities rather than acoustic's, Reilly fused a variety of traditions effortlessly -- that one song was called "Jazz" could be called a giveaway, but the free-flowing shimmers and moods always revolve around central melodies. "Conduct," with its just apparent enough key hook surrounded by interwoven, competing lines, is a standout, turning halfway through into a downright anthemic full-band rise while never being overbearing. Hannett's production gave his compositions a just-mysterious-enough sheen, with Reilly's touches on everything from surfy reverb to soft chiming turned at once alien and still warm. Consider the relentless rhythm box pulse on "Requiem for a Father," upfront but not overbearing as Reilly's filigrees and softly spiraling arpeggios unfold in the mix -- but equally appealing is "Sketch for Winter," Reilly's guitar and nothing more, a softly haunting piece living up to its name. The 1996 reissue is the edition to search for, containing six excellent bonus tracks. Two are actually solo Hannett synth pieces from the sessions, but others include an initial tribute to Joy Division's Ian Curtis, "Lips That Would Kiss," and "Sleep Will Come," featuring the group's first vocal performance thanks to A Certain Ratio member Jeremy Kerr. ~ Ned Raggett
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

CD$10.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

CD$10.49
LC

Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

After some abortive collaborations, Reilly hooked up with a regular drummer, talented fellow Mancunian Bruce Mitchell, to create LC, Durutti's second full release. Self-produced by Reilly but bearing the unmistakable hints of his earlier work with Martin Hannett, LC, named after a bit of Italian graffiti, extends Reilly's lovely talents ever further, resulting in a new set of evocative, carefully played and performed excursions on electric guitar. Mitchell's crisp but never overly dominant drumming actually starts the record off via "Sketch for Dawn I," added to by a simply captivating low series of notes from Reilly that builds into a softly triumphant melodic surge, repeating a core motif again and again. His piano playing adds a perfect counterpart, while the final touch are his vocals -- low speak-singing that sounds utterly appropriate in context, mixed low and capturing the emotional flavor at play via delivery rather than lyrical content. As great as Return is, this is perhaps even better, signaling a full flowering of Reilly's talents throughout the album. Mitchell proves him time and again to be in perfect sync with Reilly, adding gentle brio and understated variation to the latter's compositions. Nowhere is this more apparent than on "The Missing Boy," the album's unquestioned highlight. Written in memory of Ian Curtis of Joy Division, on it Mitchell adds quick, sudden hits contrasting against the low, tense atmosphere of the song, while fragile piano notes and Reilly's own regret-tinged, yearning vocals complete the picture. For all the implicit melancholy in Durutti's work, there's a surprising amount of life and energy throughout -- "Jaqueline" is perhaps the standout, with a great central melody surrounded by the expected Reilly elaborations and additions in the breaks. As with the rest of Durutti's mid-'90s reissues, the expanded version of LC appears full to the brim with intriguing bonus tracks galore. The first three capture an abortive collaboration with another Manc drummer, funk performer Donald Johnson. A contribution to a holiday album, "One Christmas for Your Thoughts," finds Reilly back with drum machines, while the very first Reilly/Mitchell collaborations, "Danny" and "Enigma," round out this excellent release. ~ Ned Raggett
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Rock - Released May 31, 2006 | FullFill

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Rock - Released June 19, 2012 | Factory Benelux

When working toward a fourth album for his softly tumultuous post-rock predicting unit Durutti Column in 1983, Vini Reilly collaborated with Tuxedomoon viola player Blaine L. Reininger on a gorgeously sad piece called "Duet," a short and filmic song that found Reininger's restless viola swells in a lover's quarrel with Reilly's pleading piano. The song was one of many pieces under construction for an album to be titled Short Stories for Pauline, but upon hearing the song, Factory Records head honcho Anthony Wilson insisted the Durutti Column make an album based entirely around its neo-classical leanings, and "Duet" expanded into 1984's turbulent Without Mercy while the rest of the songs were put on ice. Seeing its first widescale release in 2012 (though several tracks have appeared in various forms over the years), Short Stories for Pauline sheds light on an important early phase of what would prove to be Durutti Column's extensive development over the next several decades. Recorded at the height of the Factory Records scene, the echoey drums and detached, icy emotional veil that was a trademark of many of the artists on the label saturate much of the album. Reilly's unique direct guitar tones and affinity for moody instrumental compositions set him apart from some of the more rock-rooted bands on the label, and Short Stories for Pauline sees him on a creative hot streak, melding classical underpinnings with the minimal rhythms of some of his goth rock contemporaries like Section 25 and Joy Division. The reverb-coated drums of "College" and "Invitations" blend into bleak instrumental landscapes guided by Reilly's brittle guitar tones and held in place by chorus-heavy basslines. "Take Some Time Out" has a dour vocal not unlike Genesis P-Orridge's more gentle work in Psychic TV, and along with "A Silence" and the ghostly female vocals on "Mirror A," it's one of the few songs that's not completely instrumental. Short Stories for Pauline's 14 songs don't feel like an unfinished collection of sketches as much as they do a sadly shelved lost album. While "Duet" is certainly beautiful enough to merit basing an entire album around its sound, the rest of these forgotten songs find the still young Durutti Column in a creative flourish that could have spun an album's worth of material out of any of these songs, from the sad-hearted jazz experiment of "Cocktail" to the gorgeous harp-heavy sounds of the tentative album closer, "A Room in Southport." © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

For all that the previous album was called Vini Reilly, Obey the Time was in fact Durutti's most specifically Reilly-only release yet. Even percussion stalwart Mitchell only appeared on one track this time around, the fine, subtly uplifting punch of "Art and Freight," partially due to where Reilly's head was at this time around. Inspired by the late-'80s acid house revolution in England, with his native Manchester firmly at ground zero, Reilly aimed to combine that with his usual guitar approach to see what would happen. Where in nearly any other hands this would have been a pathetic crossover disaster waiting to happen, the end results are gratifyingly like what his compatriots in New Order did the previous year with Technique, synthesizing up-to-date styles to create something distinctly different. Even a title like "Spanish Reggae," which sounds like something out of world music hell, turns out to be both accurate and not a nightmare, with light flamenco snippets and other electric guitar work from Reilly fed through heavy dub echo over a slow, just menacing enough modern dancehall rhythm. While most of the percussion patterns Reilly creates aren't specifically acid in sound, reflecting more hard-slamming electro and synth-funk from earlier years, there's enough of the cusp-of-the-'90s about everything to show he wasn't dating himself. Keyboard stabs, as on "Fridays," clearly show techno's favoring of stuttering, choppy melodies, while Reilly's own knack for what suits a song best means sometimes it's more gentle acoustica and other times full-on electric shimmer and drive. "Hotel of the Lake, 1990" demonstrates his skills well, with a steady beat and clean, funky guitar and bass work accompanied by whooshing, minimal synth loops and, reappearing throughout the song, a classically Durutti five-note guitar melody with deep echo. Other numbers like the gently dramatic "The Warmest Rain" make Obey the Time another fine Durutti release. The 1998 reissue includes a 1990 dance mix by Together and, in an interesting discographical switcheroo, a moody jungle remix of "My Last Kiss" from 1998's Time Was...Gigantic album called, in a knowing nod to New Order's "The Perfect Kiss," "Kiss of Def." ~ Ned Raggett

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Durutti

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Factory Records boss Tony Wilson was Vini Reilly's first manager, his biggest supporter, and his close friend. After Wilson's 2007 death, numerous public events commemorated his accomplishments, but Reilly sought to honor him by focusing on the person he knew outside the media spotlight. He felt the best way to do this was to create a musical suite his friend would have liked. A Paean to Wilson was the result. Reilly underscores the album's conceptual unity by using Wilson's voice to frame it, opening with a 1980 sound byte of Wilson playfully quizzing Martin Hannett about his production work and concluding with a politically charged excerpt from one of his last television appearances. The music between these bookends celebrates Wilson's friendship and, fittingly, also looks back on Reilly's own work: the two were inextricably linked, and Reilly recognized that he might have never made his music were it not for Wilson. Consequently, Paean takes stock of the Durutti Column's multifaceted, genre-defying sound over the years, straddling rock, folk, electronica, flamenco, classical, and the avant-garde. Given Wilson's well-known antipathy towards Reilly's singing, this is an instrumental album, with minimal vocal parts covered largely by samples, most notably from Marvin Gaye's "What's Going On." The material ranges from the contemplative and elegiac ("The Truth" and "Along Came Poppy") to the surprisingly harsh electric guitar squalls of "Requiem," where Reilly trades melancholy for raw anger at his friend's passing. Interestingly, the retrospective feeling is also reinforced by the way several pieces rework elements of earlier tracks ("Catos Revisited"; "Duet with Piano"; "Requiem"). Ultimately, while Reilly was clearly left with an acute sense of loss and absence, this beautiful work gives his friend's spirit a continued presence. Not only is this a worthy tribute to Wilson, it's also the Durutti Column's strongest release in some time. © Wilson Neate /TiVo

Alternative & Indie - Released March 18, 2016 | Durutti

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Following up the band's second live album, A Night in New York, Durutti's composition changed slightly, with both Kellet and Metcalfe off to pursue other ventures, the former ending up in Simply Red. The core Reilly/Mitchell duo settled down in studio to create another striking development in Durutti's story, The Guitar and Other Machines. So named because of Reilly's choice to explore and use newer instruments, specifically a Yamaha Sequencer and a DMX Drum Machine among others, while also trying out new approaches with his guitar playing, first signaled on Circuses and Bread. Opening track "Arpeggiator," one of several cuts originally previewed on A Night in New York, gives a sense as to the result. There's a more straightforwardly soaring lead guitar line; quick, gently perky synth loops; a heavy drum punch; additional strings; and other touches to fill out the busy but strong arrangement. While technology in general was no stranger to the band, these instruments and approaches were, resulting in a generally lusher record than most recorded by Durutti before it, with more rather than fewer instruments being the key motif while still retaining an economy of performance. Both Metcalfe and Kellet appeared on an album highlight, "When the World," recalling the band's mid-'80s highlights while Reilly turns in a surprisingly loud, kick-ass solo, contrasting his acoustic work on the immediately following "U.S.P." Otherwise, a variety of other performers assisted the duo as needed, including producer Stephen Street, who sat in on bass on "English Landscape Tradition," and guest singers Stanton Miranda and Pol (a high point of "When the World" who ironically enough doesn't appear on "Pol in B"). Rob Gray's mouth organ work adds a nicely rootsy feel to "What Is It to Me (Woman)" and "Jongleur Grey," a notable contrast against Durutti's generally futurist approach. Continuing the string of excellent Durutti reissues, its 1996 reappearance included several other studio tracks done around that time, notably the moody and mysterious "LFO Mod," which only appeared on the Valuable Passages compilation in the U.S., and "Dream Topping," featuring a reunion with A Certain Ratio singer Jeremy Kerr. Concluding the reissue are four further tracks from a performance at Peter Gabriel's WOMAD festival, with guest appearances from Chinese opera singer Liu Sola and Swing Out Sister keyboardist Andy Connell, both of whom would feature on the Vini Reilly album. ~ Ned Raggett
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Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | LTM Recordings

Durutti's fifth studio album finds the core Reilly/Mitchell/Kellet/Metcalfe lineup of the mid-'80s still in excellent form, steering back from the lengthy excursion of Without Mercy in favor of shorter songs typical of Durutti's other recorded work. While the overall style and mood of the performers had little changed, Reilly in particular remains a master of his art, able to progress and experiment without making a big deal of it, and whose sound remains so unique still that almost any recording of it is worthwhile. Starting with the fine "Pauline," with an excellent viola line from Metcalfe helping to set the tone, Circuses and Bread doesn't radically advance Durutti so much as it codifies it further. One of his most wracked songs ever appears midway through -- "Royal Infirmary," whose combination of piano, trumpet, and gunfire almost seems like a reference to World War I, and which likely influenced similar efforts focusing on that conflict from Piano Magic and possibly even Mark Hollis. Reilly's singing in places is stronger than ever -- while still generally understated and subtle, there's less echo and a clearer, crisper recording quality. In his playing, there's slightly more of a willingness to try more common guitar approaches -- consider the strung-out solo on "Hilary," which while buried in the mix provides a near acid rock counterpoint to the usual crisp shimmer that's more upfront. Metcalfe's lines and string plucks add further fine drama, Mitchell is excellent and varied as always in his percussion approaches, and Kellet comes up with some real winners, like the mournful brass on "Street Fight." Concluding with some lengthy, exploratory tracks, including the minimal progression of "Black Horses" and "Blind Elevator Girl," Circuses and Bread is another Durutti highlight. In a curious footnote, however, it remains the sole Durutti album from the 1980s not reissued in the comprehensive late-'90s remastering/re-releasing program via Factory Once Records. Quite why this is the case remains unclear. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Marking a further progression in the overall Durutti sound, Without Mercy both an expanded lineup and sense of what could be done with Reilly's compositions. Consisting of a two-part full-album instrumental piece, Without Mercy integrates the slight hints of classical orchestration and accompaniment from Another Setting more fully via a slew of additional players. Besides the indefatigable Mitchell on percussion and Reilly on guitar, bass, and keyboards, performers on everything from viola to cor anglais and trumpet flesh out Without Mercy's sound to newly striking heights. Reilly's work on piano sets the initial mood for the song, a sound by now as intrinsic to Durutti's approach as his guitar work, capturing both tender beauty and deep melancholy just so. Manaugh Fleming's oboe and Tim Kellet's trumpet start to step in as well as Reilly's guitar, adding in here and there as needed while the track unfolds further to another typically brilliant Reilly guitar solo. From such a striking start, the song continues to unfold over the album's full length. It's very self-consciously romantic (track and album are in fact named for Keats' noted poem La Belle Dame Sans Merci), but the combination of new and old instruments, plus the continuation of the unique Durutti sheen and shine in the recording quality, results in quietly touching heights. Blaine Reininger's viola and violin and Caroline Lavelle's cello add even more classical atmosphere, while the restraint they exercise as well as all the other performers prevent things from becoming a bloated prog-rock monstrosity. Then again, the funky horns and beats about eight minutes into the second part don't hurt either. Even at its busiest, reflection and subdued but not inactive performing are the key, with clear echoes of Erik Satie's work at many points, while Reilly is almost always, either via keyboards or his guitar, front and center. The 1998 reissue matches a slightly earlier CD version with the inclusion of the Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say EP. Also appearing are two separate, very stripped-down pieces recorded around the same time, one of which, the wonderful "All That Love and Maths Can Do," features violist John Metcalfe in his first recorded effort with Durutti. ~ Ned Raggett

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Durutti

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Just a glance at the cover of Tempus Fugit indicates that it's going to be one of the more personal releases from Vini Reilly. The cover is an extreme close-up of Reilly's gaunt face and nothing more. But where its immediate predecessor, the haunting death poem Someone Else's Party, was soul-revealing, this release is a stark but exhilarating journey to the heart of Reilly's creative process. Some of the songs here are improvisations, reworkings of art-installation soundtracks, and snippets of lyrics and musical passages from the past. Gone are most of the drum machines and much of the sampling, and in their place is more focused and intense guitar strumming. And other than Jill Taylor's beautiful lullaby vocals on the wave-like "Shooting" and some ethereal humming, Reilly's voice is alone. Perhaps the primary reason Tempus Fugit seems to bare Reilly's songwriting soul is that it's the most acoustically centered album he's released in years. The interplay between his assured, chiming picking and his melancholic voice is unencumbered by most of the usual tricks and beats that paint many Durutti Column songs into genre pieces. That's not to say Tempus Fugit isn't an eclectic listen, as bits of flamenco, opera, and even some wall-of-sound beats keep the album's pulse strong. At nearly 60 minutes in length, the album never drags or releases one's interest. Tempus Fugit is an emotional, vibrant musical masterstroke from an artist who seems to never release anything less. © Tim DiGravina /TiVo

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Durutti

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Gathering further odds and ends, this compilation continues the archival project of The Sporadic Recordings and Return of the Sporadic Recordings -- somewhat ironic titles, as Vini Reilly's output has always been anything but irregular. Sporadic Three casts a retrospective eye over the Durutti Column's work via unreleased and rare tracks capturing its stylistic range through the years. As is often true of collections assembled from secondary material such as home demos, alternate versions, and outtakes, it's uneven in quality. A rudimentary rendering of the 1981 single "Danny" stands alongside Reilly's best early recordings and the ethereal, ornate "Birthday Present" is a quintessential guitarscape that wouldn't sound out of place on any Durutti Column album; by contrast, "The Best Dream," with Reilly's rather flat vocals, fails to go anywhere interesting. Reilly has periodically incorporated elements of electronic music to sublime, timeless effect, but that's not the case with "In the City," whose heavy-handed dialog samples and formulaic techno beats render it clichéd and dated. However, one of the stronger numbers, the playful "New Order Tribute," is actually a pastiche of the titular band at its most dance-oriented. Given that several tracks weren't finished articles intended for release, the inconsistency here isn't surprising, but the material does offer intriguing glimpses of Reilly at work, trying out ideas: "Dig a Hole," for instance, is a sparser, slightly quicker version of "Big Hole," which appeared on 2006's Keep Breathing, and on "Natural Mystics" Reilly sings lyrics that featured on that same album in the very different musical setting of "It's Wonderful." Ultimately, Sporadic Three is aimed at the Durutti Column completist (who else really needs more versions of "Drinking Time" or the twee "I B Yours"?); nevertheless, there's still plenty here for more casual fans of one of the most enduring and prolific original Factory artists. © Wilson Neate /TiVo

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Durutti

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

The first Durutti release on the reorganized Factory Too label, Sex and Death is Reilly once again coaxing lovely magic from his chosen instruments -- no change there, then. With the ever-present Mitchell assisting him on drums and another variety of assisting players -- old bandmate Metcalfe back again with some viola, album co-producer Stephen Street helping with a bit of bass (as does New Order's Peter Hook), three guest singers, and more -- Reilly again serves up a smart set of songs. His generally up-to-the-minute approach to recording and performing still in place, Reilly embraces breakbeat culture via hip-hop loops at points while otherwise following his particular muse as he chooses. "The Rest of My Life" could and should have been a hit single, a sharp, funky rhythm the bed for a great, slightly twangy series of guitar lines and a softly sung female vocal, intertwining just so. Meanwhile, "The Next Time" is a touch straightforward even for Reilly, with Rob Gray's passionate lead vocal soaring over the delicate soloing and big, at-times arena rock-level drums from Mitchell, which Reilly then matches with a duly bolstered but still clean rip. Interests from here and there suggest themselves throughout -- "Fado," for instance, refers to the traditional song style of Portugal, and has an air about it from that background. Other songs recall the murkier beginnings of Reilly's work, like "For Collette," Metcalfe's plucked strings echoing off into the distance over a fragile, barely there lead melody accompanied by a simple three-note loop on synth, all of which develops into another quietly triumphant anthem. He saves a sly joke for the end -- "Blue Period," not so much referring to an artistic period by anyone or another as it does the fact the song itself is a classic blues lick revamped in Reilly's own preferred playing style. ~ Ned Raggett
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Rock - Released April 2, 1996 | LTM Recordings

Like many entries in the Durutti Column's discography, Fidelity features ten separate tracks that have hardly any aesthetic resemblance to one another. Vini Reilly's positive musical attitude permeates each track, however, allowing the diverse songs to function together nicely. The almost aggressive drum work on Fidelity's opening title track starts everything off with an undeniable rock twist that transforms toward the record's end into an eclectic, postmodern work of art, complete with nifty dance and ambient moments on "Sanko" and "Grace," respectively. An acoustic jazz guitar/trumpet duo (appropriately titled "G and T") gets sandwiched in the middle of so much synthetic opera, rock, trance, and just about every other musical form that has even so much as tickled Reilly's ears. Fidelity contains no hit singles, but it's hard to imagine that such a constrained pop design could ever interest the prolific Reilly -- a composer/performer of amazing imagination and dexterity. ~ Vincent Jeffries
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Originally released in 1998, Time Was Gigantic... When We Were Kids was one of Vini Reilly's more standout Durutti Column albums after leaving Factory Records, and one in what would become an ever-growing discography. Leaning on the modern composer post-classical tones of some of his other '90s work, the album also took on a particularly 4AD brand of ethereality, due in part to guest vocals by Eley Rudge on songs like "My Last Kiss." Production duties and some songwriting were handled by longtime Durutti Column collaborator Keir Stewart. ~ Fred Thomas