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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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In 2017 with How Did I Find Myself Here?, Steve Wynn and his Dream Syndicate returned from a long break after the release of their last album Ghost Stories back in 1988. Spearheading the Paisley Underground scene, the Los Angeles group founded in 1981 mixed influences of the Velvet Underground and Neil Young. As if going back in time, one finds the Californian group as it was thirty years ago, still intact. The guitars are violent but not over-indulgent and the rhythms are perfectly hypnotic. In the spirit of How Did I Find Myself Here?, These Times unleashes all Dream Syndicate’s trademarks. Thrashing rock (The Way In), to sixties Byrds guitars (Bullet Holes), vintage keys and all the archetypal instrumentation that works perfectly with Wynn’s productions can all be found in this rather unexpected album. “When I was writing the songs for the new album I was pretty obsessed with Donuts by J Dilla. I loved the way that he approached record making as a DJ, a crate-digger, a music fan wanting to lay out all of his favorite music, twist and turn the results until he made them into his own. I was messing around with step sequencers, drum machines, loops — anything to take me out of my usual way of writing and try to feel as though I was working on a compilation rather than ‘more of the same.’ You might not automatically put the Dream Syndicate and J Dilla in the same sentence, but I hear that album when I hear our new one.” ©Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph

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Amid an apparently-endless series of "returns with a vengeance", this one in particular will please fans of American Indy rock of the 1980s. Steve Wynn has resuscitated his Dream Syndicate, whose last album to date, Ghost Stories, came out in 1988! At the cutting edge of the Paisley Underground scene, the group, founded in Los Angeles in 1981, brought together the influences of the Velvet Underground and Neil Young. They recorded three other albums: the indispensable The Days Of Wine And Roses in 1982, Medicine Show in 1984 and Out Of The Grey in 1986. They were reformed in 2012 for a series of concerts. Signed by the very fashionable ANTI label, Wynn's gang returned to the studio for good, to put down How Did I Find Myself Here?.. The rhythm section is of its times (Dennis Duck on drums and Mark Walton on bass); the lead guitar is wielded by Jason Victor, Steve Wynn's vigorous companion on several of his recent solo efforts. As if time itself had stopped, we find the Californian band's DNA fully intact. The guitars are violent but not exuberant, and the rhythms are hypnotic: without a doubt, Wynn and his accomplices know how to set off powerful tsunamis of electricity and noise (Out Of My Head) and more nuanced tempests (80 West), with the same efficiency... Finally, How Did I Find Myself Here? comes across like vintage Dream Syndicate, but with a 100% 2017 sound. A sonic upgrade which will enrapture early fans and allow new ones an easy taste of this uncompromising and venomous rock'n'roll. © MZ/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 22, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

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Only nine months after returning to the studio to cut their powerful record How Did I Find Myself Here? , The Dream Syndicate embarked on a live tour. Steve Wynn's band, even if it was born more than 35 years ago, only has five studio albums to its credit and three live albums, four including this one. The interest from their followers is huge, but a bit limited by the size of the band’s archive. And How We Found Ourselves... Everywhere! is no exception. Limited because the repertoire is very well known. But exciting all the same because the group that is now composed of fifty-year-olds offers here versions that haven’t been revisited in a long time. We find rather animated, nimble reworks of their classics When You Smile, John Coltrane Stereo Blues and The Medicine Show. So as to select only the cream of the crop, Wynn opted for a counterfeit live album, each of the six tracks coming from a different concert... The Dream Syndicate, spearhead of the 80's Paisley Underground scene, originally mixed the influences of The Velvet Underground, Television and Crazy Horse's Neil Young. A DNA that remains intact even if novices will be advised to revisit their first two records, The Days Of Wine And Roses (1982) and Medicine Show (1984). © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 16, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

In 2017 with How Did I Find Myself Here?, Steve Wynn and his Dream Syndicate returned from a long break after the release of their last album Ghost Stories back in 1988. Spearheading the Paisley Underground scene, the Los Angeles group founded in 1981 mixed influences of the Velvet Underground and Neil Young. As if going back in time, one finds the Californian group as it was thirty years ago, still intact. The guitars are violent but not over-indulgent and the rhythms are perfectly hypnotic. In the spirit of How Did I Find Myself Here?, These Times unleashes all Dream Syndicate’s trademarks. Thrashing rock (The Way In), to sixties Byrds guitars (Bullet Holes), vintage keys and all the archetypal instrumentation that works perfectly with Wynn’s productions can all be found in this rather unexpected album. “When I was writing the songs for the new album I was pretty obsessed with Donuts by J Dilla. I loved the way that he approached record making as a DJ, a crate-digger, a music fan wanting to lay out all of his favorite music, twist and turn the results until he made them into his own. I was messing around with step sequencers, drum machines, loops — anything to take me out of my usual way of writing and try to feel as though I was working on a compilation rather than ‘more of the same.’ You might not automatically put the Dream Syndicate and J Dilla in the same sentence, but I hear that album when I hear our new one.” © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 19, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released May 11, 2004 | Ryko - Rhino

On tour in support of their final album, 1988's Ghost Stories, Dream Syndicate recorded a limited-edition live album, 1989's Live at Raji's, that quickly became something of a holy grail for fans. Especially in comparison to Dream Syndicate's previous live release, the curiously flat This Is Not the New Dream Syndicate Album...Live EP from 1984, Complete Live at Raji's (an expanded double-disc set featuring the full concert) is truly remarkable. Covering the band's entire career, reaching all the way back to 1982's groundbreaking Days of Wine & Roses (over half of which is represented), the set list is a well-chosen blend of Steve Wynn's twisted character studies and the band's neo-psychedelic guitar rave-ups. The second disc in particular focuses on the latter side of Dream Syndicate's sound, consisting entirely of half-a-dozen different jams in the seven- to nine-minute range, all of which feature only the barest minimum of aimless noodling in favor of some impressively noisy solos and some of Wynn's most raw-throated singing, especially on a near-violent climax to "The Days of Wine and Roses." The whole thing is capped off with the definitive version of "John Coltrane Stereo Blues," Dream Syndicate's own "Sister Ray," which had never quite been captured in its full glory on tape before. Dream Syndicate were already kaput when the first release of Live At Raji's came out, but this expanded edition shows that unlike many of their so-called Paisley Underground contemporaries, they went out at the peak of their powers. ~ Stewart Mason
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Rock - Released August 1, 2002 | Ryko - Rhino

Opening with the self-referential "The Side I'll Never Show," and produced by Neil Young and Crazy Horse vet Elliot Mazer, Wynn and Co. mine the dark and rusty terrain of folk and blues-rock that they ultimately made work to their advantage on this very straight-ahead rock album. Wynn's vocal style and forthright lyrics never really connected with the masses at the time, but years later, it's clear he was making music for the ages. ~ Denise Sullivan
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 22, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

Only nine months after returning to the studio to cut their powerful record How Did I Find Myself Here? , The Dream Syndicate embarked on a live tour. Steve Wynn's band, even if it was born more than 35 years ago, only has five studio albums to its credit and three live albums, four including this one. The interest from their followers is huge, but a bit limited by the size of the band’s archive. And How We Found Ourselves... Everywhere! is no exception. Limited because the repertoire is very well known. But exciting all the same because the group that is now composed of fifty-year-olds offers here versions that haven’t been revisited in a long time. We find rather animated, nimble reworks of their classics When You Smile, John Coltrane Stereo Blues and The Medicine Show. So as to select only the cream of the crop, Wynn opted for a counterfeit live album, each of the six tracks coming from a different concert... The Dream Syndicate, spearhead of the 80's Paisley Underground scene, originally mixed the influences of The Velvet Underground, Television and Crazy Horse's Neil Young. A DNA that remains intact even if novices will be advised to revisit their first two records, The Days Of Wine And Roses (1982) and Medicine Show (1984). © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 4, 2014 | Omnivore Recordings

Booklet
As the punning title indicates, this welcome document of an early Dream Syndicate show, recorded live-in-studio for Los Angeles' KPFK station in 1982, captures the fierce intensity of the band's first lineup shortly before the release of the actual Days of Wine and Roses album. Featuring both an array of originals and well-chosen covers, Day Before is arguably the group at its best, well before the endless series of band conflicts and attempts to reach too far too fast slowly ground away at Wynn and company. Precoda is simply on fire here, maybe even more so than on Days of Wine and Roses itself, while the band as a whole gels and makes it clear that channeling inspirations of the past into the present was no crime when done so well. Hosted by longtime DJ/critic Andrea 'Enthal, who sets the stage with her introductory banter as crowds of friends and fans come in -- the show itself started recording at about 2 a.m. in the morning! -- the recording features some amusing comments from the band along with the strong performances. There are some radical reworkings: "Some Kinda Itch" is a slower, smokier number in this incarnation, the late-night setting perfectly matching its strung-out mood, while "John Coltrane Stereo Blues" appears under the name "Open Hour"" as a slightly more stripped-down jam. Other things don't change at all -- "The Days of Wine and Roses" itself, which understandably closes the set, is as blasting as one could want. The inclusion of the covers is explained away by Wynn thus: "If you're going to bootleg this, we don't want to have to worry about the royalties." Some choices are obvious -- Buffalo Springfield's "Mr. Soul" and Bob Dylan's "Outlaw Blues" -- but the revamp of Donovan's "Season of the Witch" is more unexpected but plenty exciting. ~ Ned Raggett
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph

Amid an apparently-endless series of "returns with a vengeance", this one in particular will please fans of American Indy rock of the 1980s. Steve Wynn has resuscitated his Dream Syndicate, whose last album to date, Ghost Stories, came out in 1988! At the cutting edge of the Paisley Underground scene, the group, founded in Los Angeles in 1981, brought together the influences of the Velvet Underground and Neil Young. They recorded three other albums: the indispensable The Days Of Wine And Roses in 1982, Medicine Show in 1984 and Out Of The Grey in 1986. They were reformed in 2012 for a series of concerts. Signed by the very fashionable ANTI label, Wynn's gang returned to the studio for good, to put down How Did I Find Myself Here?.. The rhythm section is of its times (Dennis Duck on drums and Mark Walton on bass); the lead guitar is wielded by Jason Victor, Steve Wynn's vigorous companion on several of his recent solo efforts. As if time itself had stopped, we find the Californian band's DNA fully intact. The guitars are violent but not exuberant, and the rhythms are hypnotic: without a doubt, Wynn and his accomplices know how to set off powerful tsunamis of electricity and noise (Out Of My Head) and more nuanced tempests (80 West), with the same efficiency... Finally, How Did I Find Myself Here? comes across like vintage Dream Syndicate, but with a 100% 2017 sound. A sonic upgrade which will enrapture early fans and allow new ones an easy taste of this uncompromising and venomous rock'n'roll. © MZ/Qobuz
$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2017 | Anti - Epitaph