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Rock - Released January 23, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released January 4, 1967 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released October 22, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released October 30, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released October 30, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released October 19, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released September 27, 2011 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released September 27, 2011 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released November 1, 2019 | Rhino - Elektra

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The rock’n’roll history books have often considered The Soft Parade to be The Doors’ worst album. Fifty years after its release on the 18th of July 1969, a re-evaluation of the Californians’ fourth opus establishes itself. Exactly a year after Waiting for the Sun, The Doors changed their modus operandi with an album which was viscerally less rock’n’roll. Unmanageable, completely obsessed with his poetry, more and more dependant on alcohol and always seemingly on the brink of leaving the band (held back in extremis by the keyboard player Ray Manzarek), Jim Morrison only wrote half of the tracks on this album. The guitarist Robbie Krieger stepped up to the mark and took the helm writing-wise, as well as developing the band’s instrumentation. Headed by Paul Harris, brass and strings make an unexpected appearance in the band’s sound. Notes of jazz dilute the pure rock sound and bring a more bluesy texture, as well as some pop and even some lounge-style sequences. An eclectic mix which is slightly confusing to begin with, but it stops The Doors’ unique singularity from dwindling. The melodies on The Soft Parade are peraps not of the same calibre as those on the three previous albums, but at an era when the competition was also experimenting with some stranger sounds, Jim Morrison, Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore prove that they too can steer rock music into uncharted territories. This 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition offers a new remastered version from producer Bruce Botnick, as well as bonus tracks like Who Scared You, as well as some unedited tracks, like demo versions of Doors Only, versions without brass or strings of Tell All the People, Touch Me, Wishful Sinful and Runnin’ Blue. Finally, among all these exciting new features of this 2019 edition, some interesting new guitar sections added by Krieger to Touch Me, Wishful Sinful and Runnin’ Blue. All in all, enough unedited material to please fans and better understand this musical mystery. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 25, 2007 | Rhino - Elektra

The various releases of The Very Best of the Doors during 2001 and 2007 in the U.S. and the U.K. are very similar, both in their single-disc and double-disc permutations -- as well as a limited edition that adds a DVD to the two-CD version -- so it's very easy to get all three compilations confused. That said, there are notable differences between all three U.K. comps and the original U.S. set. The American disc from 2007 weighs in at 16 tracks while the single-disc U.K. set is longer at 20 tracks and, in fact, boasts a stronger overall selection of songs, making this arguably the best single-disc introduction to the band yet assembled. The double-disc U.K. set doesn't just add a second disc, it has a different sequencing as well and consequently feels like a very different beast than the original set. It's a compilation that digs deeper into album tracks and radio favorites, sometimes getting songs that maybe should have been on the U.K. single disc -- such as "Five to One," for instance, a Doors standard that's on the U.S. single disc but not the U.K. -- but its real strength is how it paints a richer portrait of the band. It's for the listener who wants a bigger picture of the Doors without investing in the actual albums or a box set and, in that sense, this Very Best of the Doors (along with the version with the DVD) does its job well. So, choose wisely: if you're looking for an introduction or just the hits, take either of the 2001 or 2007 single discs; if you're looking for most of the best, pick the double-disc set, either with or without the DVD; if you know you love the band already, go for Perception. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 3, 1968 | Rhino - Elektra

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In 1967 the world hadn’t fully digested the Doors’ astounding first album that they had already released Strange Days. Strange like these compositions that sounded like no other. Staggering, often dreamlike themes. And while Jim Morrison sang that people were strange, the same could be said about his Doors: incessant changes in rhythm, lyrics going back and forth between social critic and complete madness, and huge gaps between total trance and cabaret ballads… Months went by and Morrison was growing more and more out of control. In early 1968, the Doors nevertheless started working on their Waiting for the Sun. There are many anecdotes about these most chaotic weeks. Yet, upon its release in July, in the midst of the Vietnam War, fans appropriated pacifist anthem The Unknown Soldier and perky Hello, I Love You that opens this third album and propelled it to the top of the charts. Well aware of their leader’s unstable state, Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore remained focused to create original and inspired parts. A notch below the two previous albums, Waiting for the Sun however approaches psychedelic music with the same unwavering originality. The use of acoustic instruments and refinement of some arrangements confirm the uniqueness of this band, even though it was on the verge of imploding…In celebration of the album’s 50th anniversary, this deluxe edition offers a new version of the album’s stereo mix, remastered by Bruce Botnick, the Doors’ long-time sound engineer and producer. Without omitting 14 bonus tracks: nine come from recently discovered rough mixes and five originate from a concert in Copenhagen in December 1968. The new stereo mix for Waiting for the Sun, remastered by Botnick, gives a new dimension to songs like The Unknown Soldier and Spanish Caravan. As for the rough mixes, his opinion is clear: “I prefer some of these rough mixes to the finals, as they represent all of the elements and additional background vocals, different sensibilities on balances, and some intangible roughness, all of which are quite attractive and refreshing”. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | Rhino - Elektra

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The public has still not digested the staggering début album that the Doors brought out in 1967, the same year as Strange Days. Strange indeed: these compositions are quite unlike those of any other group. The themes stumble; they are often dreamlike. If Jim Morrison sings that People Are Strange, we could say the same of the Doors... incessant changes of rhythm, lyrics that alternate between social critique and pure delirium, and almighty lurches from total trance to ballads and cabaret: it all has the air of the big top and circus acrobatics… Something like the picture on the album sleeve. A cabaret that defies classification, directed by a Morrison with greater skill than ever (his monologue on Horse Latitudes) – and the cherry on this fascinating poetical and psychedelic cake... To celebrate fifty years of the album, this edition offers two remastered versions: one in stereo, and one in mono. © MZ/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 1971 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released July 10, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

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In 1967 the world hadn’t fully digested the Doors’ astounding first album that they had already released Strange Days. Strange like these compositions that sounded like no other. Staggering, often dreamlike themes. And while Jim Morrison sang that people were strange, the same could be said about his Doors: incessant changes in rhythm, lyrics going back and forth between social critic and complete madness, and huge gaps between total trance and cabaret ballads… Months went by and Morrison was growing more and more out of control. In early 1968, the Doors nevertheless started working on their Waiting for the Sun. There are many anecdotes about these most chaotic weeks. Yet, upon its release in July, in the midst of the Vietnam War, fans appropriated pacifist anthem The Unknown Soldier and perky Hello, I Love You that opens this third album and propelled it to the top of the charts. Well aware of their leader’s unstable state, Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore remained focused to create original and inspired parts. A notch below the two previous albums, Waiting for the Sun however approaches psychedelic music with the same unwavering originality. The use of acoustic instruments and refinement of some arrangements confirm the uniqueness of this band, even though it was on the verge of imploding… © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 9, 2006 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released September 15, 2017 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released January 4, 1967 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Released March 13, 2012 | Rhino - Elektra

This six-disc compendium contains the complete run -- four sets over two nights -- by the Doors' at the Felt Forum in New York City January 17 and 18, 1970. Although previously unavailable in its entirety, music from these programs has shown up prominently throughout several live packages -- namely Absolutely Live (1970), and Alive She Cried (1983). Additionally, over an hour was excerpted to create the "Live in New York" CD within The Doors Box Set (1997). Most any unissued live material from the original quartet of John Densmore (drums), Robbie Krieger (guitar), Ray Manzarek (keyboards/vocals) and Jim Morrison (vocals/percussion) could be considered cause for celebration. However, the experience of hearing the band's ebb and flow as they organically develop the performance in real-time -- as opposed to hearing a package of material that has been cherry-picked after the fact -- is one of several advantages that the Live in New York (2009) anthology has over its predecessors. Another is the stunning fidelity throughout, thanks to the work of Doors' original producer/engineer Bruce Botnick and the exhaustive processes of restoring the eight-track, open-reel master tapes. With so much territory to cover -- over seven hours in all -- there are, inevitably, a few audio dropouts. In those rare instances, very good quality substitutions from other sources (of the exact same material) almost seamlessly fill in any moments that might be missing due to reel changes and the like. Always a question mark in terms of performance quality, Morrison is on pretty good behavior and in exceptional voice. Immediate evidence can be found on the soulful reading of "Blue Sunday" from the first show. However, by the final outing, his husky and raspy vocals make it clear that he is rapidly losing his range. Morrison has also cleaned up his stage prattle in the wake of the infamous occurrence where it was alleged that on March 1, 1969 in Miami, FL Morrison exposed himself during the show. A warrant was subsequently issued for his arrest on one felony count of lewd and lascivious behavior and three misdemeanor counts of indecent exposure, open profanity, and drunkenness. Certainly far from scared straight, he seems to have gotten the message, and was actually awaiting trial at the time of these recordings. He even jokingly refers to it during the spoken "Only When the Moon Comes Out" interlude on the 18th. On paper, there is little variance between each of the four set lists. However, the energy and vibe vacillate significantly from version to version and show to show. The core inclusions of "Roadhouse Blues," "Ship of Fools," "Alabama Song," "Light My Fire," and a combo pairing "Back Door Man" with "Five to One" were played every time. While "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)," "Break on Through (To the Other Side)," and "Who Do You Love" were done a bit less frequently. On the other hand, there are rarities aplenty as "Blue Sunday," "Love Hides," "Little Red Rooster," "Crawling King Snake," a half-hearted "Wild Child," "The End," "Celebration of the Lizard," "Close to You" (sung by Manzarek) -- plus the four-song encore on the 18th that includes "Rock Me Baby," "Going to N.Y. Blues," "Maggie M'Gill," and "Gloria" were only unleashed once. During that same finale, former Lovin' Spoonful co-founder John Sebastian (harmonica) is invited on-stage. According to Bruce Botnick's "technical note" found in the accompanying liner notes booklet: "When John came onstage to join The Doors for the Sunday second show encore, he was handed a microphone that was only going through The Doors' sound system, and not plugged into the Fedco Audio Labs mobile truck. As a consequence, John's harmonica didn't get recorded. So, earlier in 2009, we arranged for John to join Ray Manzarek and myself at Skywalker Sound in San Rafael. John replayed his parts as closely as possible against the PA leakage from the audience tracks on the original recorded 8-track masters." Purists will be able to use a code on the Rhino Web site (www.rhino.com) to download the untampered versions. © TiVo

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The Doors in the magazine
  • The Doors opening up
    The Doors opening up For its 50th anniversary, "The Soft Parade" is being released in a deluxe remastered edition. Criticised upon its release, this 4th album by Jim Morrison's band is worth a fresh listen...