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Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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With their surprise success behind them, the Cranberries went ahead and essentially created a sequel to Everybody Else is Doing It, So Why Can't We with only tiny variations, with mixed results. The fact that the album is essentially a redo of previously established stylistic ground isn't apparent in just the production, handled again by Stephen Street, or the overall sound, or even that one particularly fine song is called "Dreaming My Dreams." Everybody wasn't a laugh riot, to be sure, but No Need to Argue starts to see O'Riordan take a more commanding and self-conscious role that ended up not standing the band in good stead later. Lead single "Zombie" is the offender in this regard -- the heavy rock trudge isn't immediately suited for the band's strengths (notably, O'Riordan wrote this without Noel Hogan) -- while the subject matter (the continuing Northern Ireland tensions) ends up sounding trivialized. Opening cut "Ode to My Family" is actually one of the band's best, with a lovely string arrangement created by O'Riordan, her overdubbed vocals showing her distinct vocal tics. Where No Need succeeds best is when the Cranberries stick at what they know, resulting in a number of charmers like "Twenty One," the uilleann pipes-touched "Daffodil's Lament," which has an epic sweep that doesn't overbear like "Zombie," and the evocative "Disappointment." ~ Ned Raggett
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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The story of this album’s genesis is both a sad and beautiful one. Sad because it is the band’s 8th and final album (in their initial line-up at least), but beautiful because we get the pleasure of hearing the voice of Dolores O'Riordan once more, who died suddenly on 15th January 2018. It’s thanks to demos recorded a few weeks before her passing that this musical resurrection has been possible: Noel Hogan, The Cranberries’ guitarist, had started working on the tracks in May 2017 while on tour, before recording eleven demos with the singer a few months later. It’s with the support of the O’Riordan family that the bandmembers came back together once more to complete the songs. Strangely, the titles and lyrics are often about loss and endings in these songs that pack significant emotional impact, not only because of the tragedy that surrounds them, but also because the melodies and arrangements are often intrinsically melancholic. The strings that surround the finale of a piece like Lost, or the litanic piano of Catch Me If You Can, only reinforce the chills that flow through the listener when listening to In the End. But as they have often demonstrated over the past three decades, this Irish band never loses sight of a certain hope and energy; the lyrical melodies of Got It (with its overwhelming bass), and Summer Song are here to prove it. The ballads Illusion and In the End have a kind of twilight quality, but of the softest and most benevolent sunset there is. With this album recorded in London by producer Stephen Street (having already been at the helm of Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We? in 1993 and No Need to Argue in 1994), The Cranberries bow out with elegance and modesty. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 28, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Indeed a little extra for diehards and new fans alike, the Cranberries' Something Else serves as both a great primer to the band's classics and a suitable greatest-hits collection. Like Tori Amos' orchestral reworkings on Gold Dust, this release shines a fresh light and decades of hindsight on the Irish group's ten biggest singles, reinterpreted here with the string quartet from the Irish Chamber Orchestra. Dolores O'Riordan's voice remains in fine form, smooth and rich with maturity, backed by her steadfast bandmates Noel and Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawler. Their 1993 debut, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, is represented by arguably their best-known songs, "Linger" and "Dreams." The sweeping renditions reinvigorate both songs with more life than their original forms, a treatment that improves a handful of others like 1996's To the Faithful Departed contributions "When You're Gone" and "Free to Decide." On the flip side, the songs that had more bite in their original incarnations are toned down for Something Else, creating an equally alluring angle to the songwriting. Their 1994 alt-rock standard "Zombie" loses its rage, but becomes the somber lament that, deep down, it always was. Likewise, "Ridiculous Thoughts" -- also from the seven-times platinum No Need to Argue -- transforms into a sweeping and yearning plea. The nostalgia trip finishes with 1999's Bury the Hatchet -- "Just My Imagination," "Animal Instinct," and "You & Me" arrive in a satisfying trio toward the close -- before Something Else ends on one of its three new songs. In addition to "The Glory" and "Rupture" -- which sound like B-sides from Departed and Hatchet, respectively -- Something Else includes the heartbreaking "Why?" Written after the passing of O'Riordan's father, "Why?" sounds a lot like her solo work, elevated here by the band into one of their most dramatic and haunting moments. Something Else is worthwhile for the faithful, offering new spins on songs that they likely know by heart, and is an easily digestible snapshot of their 20th century output for those in need of a reminder of the beloved Limerick group's legacy. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

$14.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

The story of this album’s genesis is both a sad and beautiful one. Sad because it is the band’s 8th and final album (in their initial line-up at least), but beautiful because we get the pleasure of hearing the voice of Dolores O'Riordan once more, who died suddenly on 15th January 2018. It’s thanks to demos recorded a few weeks before her passing that this musical resurrection has been possible: Noel Hogan, The Cranberries’ guitarist, had started working on the tracks in May 2017 while on tour, before recording eleven demos with the singer a few months later. It’s with the support of the O’Riordan family that the bandmembers formed back together once more to complete the songs.  Strangely, the titles and lyrics are often about loss and endings in these songs that pack significant emotional impact, not only because of the tragedy that surrounds them, but also because the melodies and arrangements are often intrinsically melancholic. The strings that surround the finale of a piece like Lost, or the litanic piano of Catch Me If You Can, only reinforce the chills that inevitably flow through the listener when listening to In the End. But as they have often proved over the past three decades, this Irish band never loses sight of a certain hope and communicative energy. The lyrical melodies of Got It (with its overwhelming bass), and Summer Song are here to prove it. The ballads Illusion and In the End have a twilight quality, but of the softest and most benevolent sunshine there is. With this album recorded in London by producer Stephen Street (having already been at the helm of Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We? in 1993 and No Need to Argue in 1994), The Cranberries bow out with elegance and modesty. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1993 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

$13.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

$38.49

Rock - Released March 1, 1993 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released January 15, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

$61.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

$14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

With their surprise success behind them, the Cranberries went ahead and essentially created a sequel to Everybody Else is Doing It, So Why Can't We with only tiny variations, with mixed results. The fact that the album is essentially a redo of previously established stylistic ground isn't apparent in just the production, handled again by Stephen Street, or the overall sound, or even that one particularly fine song is called "Dreaming My Dreams." Everybody wasn't a laugh riot, to be sure, but No Need to Argue starts to see O'Riordan take a more commanding and self-conscious role that ended up not standing the band in good stead later. Lead single "Zombie" is the offender in this regard -- the heavy rock trudge isn't immediately suited for the band's strengths (notably, O'Riordan wrote this without Noel Hogan) -- while the subject matter (the continuing Northern Ireland tensions) ends up sounding trivialized. Opening cut "Ode to My Family" is actually one of the band's best, with a lovely string arrangement created by O'Riordan, her overdubbed vocals showing her distinct vocal tics. Where No Need succeeds best is when the Cranberries stick at what they know, resulting in a number of charmers like "Twenty One," the uilleann pipes-touched "Daffodil's Lament," which has an epic sweep that doesn't overbear like "Zombie," and the evocative "Disappointment." ~ Ned Raggett
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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

The Cranberries stumbled with their move toward heavier, politically fueled modern rock on To the Faithful Departed, losing fans enamored with their earlier sound. Like many groups that see their stardom fading, the band decided to return after a short hiatus with a mildly updated, immaculately constructed distillation of everything that earned them an audience in the first place. It's immediately apparent that Bury the Hatchet has retreated from the ludicrous posturing that marred To the Faithful. There are no blasts of distorted guitar -- as a matter of fact, there are no songs that even qualify as "rockers" -- and there is little preaching, even on Dolores O'Riordan's most earnest songs. Every note and gesture is pitched at the adult alternative mainstream, which is a good thing. Though they ran away from the dreamy jangle of their first hits, the Cranberries never sounded more convincing than on mid-tempo, folky pop tunes with polished productions. Sonically, that's precisely what Bury the Hatchet delivers, complete with little flourishes -- a Bacharachian horn chart there, cinematic strings there -- to illustrate that the band did indeed know what was hip in the late '90s. All this planning -- some might call it calculation -- shouldn't come as a surprise, since Bury the Hatchet is essentially a make-or-break album, but what is a surprise is that the end result is the most consistent record of their career. It's not necessarily their best -- it lacks the immediate singles of their first two records -- but all the songs work together to form a whole; not even embarrassments like the skittering "Copycat" interrupt the flow of the record. True, the album never challenges listeners, but it delivers on their expectations -- and after To the Faithful Departed, that comes as a relief. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1996 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

To the Faithful Departed turned out to be where the Cranberries' best intentions finally and thoroughly tripped them up. Switching producers to Bruce Fairbairn was a troubling enough move to begin with; Stephen Street's ear for the band's dynamics was note-perfect, but Fairbairn's work with arena-rock monsters like Aerosmith meant that on Departed everything was scaled up accordingly. The results may have been more commercial, but they took the identity of the band with it -- the opening song "Hollywood" was a sludgefest that, ironically, didn't give the band the muscular kick that propelled songs like "Zombie." O'Riordan, meanwhile, decided she was a generation's spokesperson, fully taking over the songwriting, except on a couple of cuts with Noel Hogan, penning some appropriate liner notes, and running with it. Songtitles say it all -- "War Child," "I Just Shot John Lennon," complete with cheesy gun shots, and perhaps most painfully obvious at the end, "Bosnia." Then there's lead single "Salvation," which preaches against heroin addiction in a manner worthy of afterschool specials and with about as much depth. Not that good songs can't and haven't been written on these subjects, of course, but O'Riordan, lacking a truly individual or unique take on them, is not the person to be writing them. Or singing them -- her wails and yelps now run rampant, being less voice-as-instrument as it is signature calling card to be employed throughout. There are bright points -- every so often Hogan's guitar comes through at its best, and there's the retro-'50s finger-snapping "When You're Gone" and the nicely arranged "Electric Blue." Still, when compared to No Need and especially Everybody, Departed completely suffers in comparison. ~ Ned Raggett

Pop/Rock - Released December 3, 2012 | Concert Live Ltd

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Recorded on February 20 at the Hammersmith Apollo in London, Live 2012 follows up on the success of Irish alt-rockers the Cranberries' popular Live 2010 release. Featuring 22 tracks, including the perennial hits "Zombie," "Dreams," and "Linger," the set also includes songs from the group's 2012 studio release, Roses. ~ James Christopher Monger

Pop/Rock - Released February 6, 2012 | Concert Live Ltd

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Selected from the nine gigs that the pioneering Concert Live label recorded on their European tour, the Cranberries' 2010 sell-out gig at the Zenith de Paris shows that the Irish rock quartet have lost none of their spark during their nine-year hiatus. On a 21-track set (spread over three discs here), Dolores O'Riordan reveals her distinctive, lilting tones are still as powerful as ever, effortlessly switching from angst-ridden banshee on the crunching rock of their emotive signature hit "Zombie," and the anti-drug anthem "Salvation," to delicate, folky songstress on the beautifully nostalgic "Ode to My Family," and the shuffling acoustic ballad "You and Me." Despite a new album in the pipeline, the band wisely opt to steer clear of any unknown new material or radical interpretations, providing fans with the opportunity to hear faithful renditions of hit after hit from their '90s heyday, although the six numbers from 1999's Bury the Hatchet seem a little unrepresentative, considering it only sold a fraction of their first two juggernauts. The three tracks from O'Riordan's solo career ("Ordinary Day," "Switch of the Moment," "The Journey") slot in surprisingly well with the likes of U.K. Top 20 singles "Promises" and "Ridiculous Thoughts," and although the audience interaction, such as the constant handclaps on "Dreams," and the singalong chorus of "Linger," sometimes becomes a little too audible, it's a consistently enjoyable affair which, unlike many reunion tours, never feels likes it's simply going through the motions. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 1, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

$16.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Island Def Jam

On Friday, January 14, 1994, the Cranberries' single "Linger" was bulleted at number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100, on its way to a peak at number eight, and the band had just concluded a successful tour of the U.S. that would help break it in other territories. So, it was no surprise that Dolores O'Riordan turned up on-stage at London's Astoria 2 club that night draped in an American flag. Nor was it surprising that the group was being trailed by a camera crew that caught the sound and feel of an act just at the point of breaking through. Their debut album, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can't We?, released ten months earlier, had peaked at number 64 in the British charts and "Linger," their only charting single so far, had spent just one week at number 74 the previous February. All that was about to change, however (the album would soar to number one, and reissued singles "Linger" and "Dreams" would reach the Top 30), and that was in the air as the band took the stage. Every song from the album -- "Pretty," "Linger," "How," "Not Sorry," "Waltzing Back," "Dreams," and "Still Can't..." -- was greeted with raucous applause. But the Cranberries were on a slightly different wavelength from that of their audience. Having played these songs for a couple of years, they seemed far more interested in new material, and they introduced a batch of it -- "Dreaming My Dreams," "Ridiculous Thoughts," "Daffodils Lament," "Everything I Said," "Zombie," and "Empty." All of these would turn up on their second album, No Need to Argue, nine months hence, but buyers of this video got a five-month advance glimpse. (Also included in the set were "Liar," a previously issued B-side, and "So Cold in Ireland," a B-side to be.) The focus, as usual, was on O'Riordan, appearing in a sleeveless black lace dress and a red knit cap over her short hair, heavily accessorized with multiple silver bracelets on her left arm, multiple silver necklaces, and a right ear containing six studs and three earrings that made the side of her head look like a pincushion. O'Riordan's bandmates stayed out of the spotlight and often looked bored, but her intensity made up for that. She herself might have been bored with the old songs, but she fed off the audience when performing them, and her enthusiasm for the new songs drew her listeners' interest. The result was a mesmerizing show by a young band that was crossing over the line to stardom. [The DVD reissue includes a 5.1 mix.] ~ William Ruhlmann
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Pop - Released January 1, 2008 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Gold, a double-disc rendering of hits, singles, album cuts, and B-sides, provides Cranberries fans with a nice balance between 2002's single-disc Stars: The Best of 1992-2002 and the mammoth Treasure Box: The Complete Sessions, 1991-1999, the latter of which featured all of the popular Irish band's remastered albums stocked with 21 bonus tracks. The Cranberries called it quits in 2003, but they left an impressive string of radio gems -- like "Dreams," "Linger," "Zombie," and "Salvation" -- that successfully blended the Celtic-infused melodies of their homeland with the lush and accessible modern rock that grew out of the early-'90s alternative scene. ~ James Christopher Monger