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Pop - Released January 1, 1963 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Exceptional Sound Recording
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions Sélection Les Inrocks
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Records

After gaining control of the Beach Boys' entire catalog (including all the band's post-1969 material), Capitol released two-fers covering their out of print '70s records and a Brian Wilson-selected compilation titled Classics, then later, this hits compilation -- the longest single-disc American collection ever seen. With all but five tracks coming from their 1962-1969 peak, and every one a Top 40 hit, Sounds of Summer: The Very Best of the Beach Boys is also the best, a worthy digital-age successor to previous classics like Endless Summer and Greatest Hits, Vol. 1. Though the songs don't appear in chronological order, the compilers improved the concept of a hits compilation by bunching the disc into minisets -- one of classic adolescence songs ("Be True to Your School," "When I Grow Up [To Be a Man]," "In My Room"), one of surfing songs ("Surfin' Safari," "Surfin' U.S.A.," "Surfer Girl"), one of frat-boy classics ("Dance, Dance, Dance," "Barbara Ann"), and another including selections from their masterpiece Pet Sounds ("God Only Knows," "Sloop John B.," "Wouldn't It Be Nice"). Nearly any compilation on an important artist can be argued, but it's the rare one that covers as many bases and leaves out so few classics as Sounds of Summer: The Very Best of the Beach Boys. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 8, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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The Beach Boys, the most popular surf band of the sixties then pop masters in the United States, have been the only ones able to confront the Beatles. Beyond the incredible success of some titles, Brian Wilson’s genius has always been recognized and the man has been labeled as a visionary composer. Fifty years later, Nick Patrick and Don Reedman launch into the production of an album mixing original vocal performances and modern symphonic arrangements. The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra then lights up seventeen titles with the most perfect balance and intensity, conducted by Steeve Sidwell and Sally Herbert. Good Vibrations, California Girls, or even Wouldn’t It Be Nice, the band’s hits enjoy a new interpretation that in no way tarnishes the original nature of the work. Everything is sublimed and we realize the power of the vocal harmonies, the complexity of the arrangements, the subtleties and the omnipresence of the choirs. A string ensemble becomes agitated and makes way for Carl Wilson’s guitar and lands us in 66 on Fun, Fun, Fun. The trip with the Beach Boys is extremely pleasant on this quality album, each composition finds itself finally completed, as if they had always lacked something. Today, the mystery has been solved. The whole album is coated with a multitude of layers that you unravel with each new listening session. Here is all the ingenuity of the band with an extremely rich writing, but accessible to all. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1969 | Capitol Records

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20/20 was not a proper album, being compiled from singles and leftovers in order to fulfill contractual obligations to Capitol. Nonetheless, it's one of their better post-Pet Sounds records, with a couple of good medium-sized late-'60s hit singles, "Do It Again" and "I Can Hear Music," that were fun retro sort of exercises. "Time to Get Alone," with its unusually shifting, jazzy melody, was one of Brian Wilson's last outstanding compositions. "Never Learn Not to Love" is far more notorious, not for the music (which is average), but for the fact that it was, according to some sources, composed by Charles Manson (although the song is credited to Dennis Wilson). The highlights, however, were a couple of Smile-session-era tunes, especially "Cabinessence," a suite-like collaboration between Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks that gives some idea of the complex directions that were being explored during that ill-fated project. Therein lay the group's dilemma: as hard as they were trying to establish their identity as an integrated band in the late '60s, their new recordings were overshadowed by the bits and pieces of Smile that emerged at the time. [Friends/20/20, a Capitol two-fer CD, combines this and its predecessor Friends onto one disc, adding five bonus tracks also cut in the late '60s, highlighted by the minor hit "Break Away," Dennis Wilson's oddly spacy "Celebrate the News," and a cover of "Walk on By."] © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Capitol Records

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1965 | Capitol Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1967 | Capitol Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Records

Booklet
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Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records