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Pop - Released January 1, 1963 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Exceptional sound
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Distinctions Sélection Les Inrocks
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Rock - Released January 1, 1966 | Capitol Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
The Beach Boys' post-1966 catalog is littered with LPs that barely scraped the charts upon release but matured into solid fan favorites despite -- and occasionally, because of -- their many and varied eccentricities. Surf's Up could well be the definitive example, beginning with the cloying "Don't Go Near the Water" and ending a bare half-hour later with the baroque majesty of the title track (originally written in 1966). The album is a virtual laundry list of each uncommon intricacy that made the Beach Boys' forgotten decade such a bittersweet thrill -- the fluffy yet endearing pop (od)ditties of Brian Wilson, quasi-mystical white-boy soul from brother Carl, and the downright laughable songwriting on tracks charting Mike Love's devotion to Buddhism and Al Jardine's social/environmental concerns. Those songs are enjoyable enough, but the last three tracks are what make Surf's Up such a masterpiece. The first, "A Day in the Life of a Tree," is simultaneously one of Brian's most deeply touching and bizarre compositions; he is the narrator and object of the song (though not the vocalist; co-writer Jack Rieley lends a hand), lamenting his long life amid the pollution and grime of a city park while the somber tones of a pipe organ build atmosphere. The second, "'Til I Die," isn't the love song the title suggests; it's a haunting, fatalistic piece of pop surrealism that appeared to signal Brian's retirement from active life. The album closer, "Surf's Up," is a masterpiece of baroque psychedelia, probably the most compelling track from the SMiLE period. Carl gives a soulful performance despite the surreal wordplay, and Brian's coda is one of the most stirring moments in his catalog. Wrapped up in a mess of contradictions, Surf's Up defined the Beach Boys' tumultuous career better than any other album. ~ John Bush
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Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The best Beach Boys album, and one of the best of the 1960s. The group here reached a whole new level in terms of both composition and production, layering tracks upon tracks of vocals and instruments to create a richly symphonic sound. Conventional keyboards and guitars were combined with exotic touches of orchestrated strings, bicycle bells, buzzing organs, harpsichords, flutes, Theremin, Hawaiian-sounding string instruments, Coca-Cola cans, barking dogs, and more. It wouldn't have been a classic without great songs, and this has some of the group's most stunning melodies, as well as lyrical themes which evoke both the intensity of newly born love affairs and the disappointment of failed romance (add in some general statements about loss of innocence and modern-day confusion as well). The spiritual quality of the material is enhanced by some of the most gorgeous upper-register male vocals (especially by Brian and Carl Wilson) ever heard on a rock record. "Wouldn't It Be Nice," "God Only Knows," "Caroline No," and "Sloop John B" (the last of which wasn't originally intended to go on the album) are the well-known hits, but equally worthy are such cuts as "You Still Believe in Me," "Don't Talk," "I Know There's an Answer," and "I Just Wasn't Made for These Times." It's often said that this is more of a Brian Wilson album than a Beach Boys recording (session musicians played most of the parts), but it should be noted that the harmonies are pure Beach Boys (and some of their best). Massively influential upon its release (although it was a relatively low seller compared to their previous LPs), it immediately vaulted the band into the top level of rock innovators among the intelligentsia, especially in Britain, where it was a much bigger hit. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Capitol Records

After gaining control of the Beach Boys' entire catalog (including all the band's post-1969 material), Capitol released two-fers covering their out of print '70s records and a Brian Wilson-selected compilation titled Classics, then later, this hits compilation -- the longest single-disc American collection ever seen. With all but five tracks coming from their 1962-1969 peak, and every one a Top 40 hit, Sounds of Summer: The Very Best of the Beach Boys is also the best, a worthy digital-age successor to previous classics like Endless Summer and Greatest Hits, Vol. 1. Though the songs don't appear in chronological order, the compilers improved the concept of a hits compilation by bunching the disc into minisets -- one of classic adolescence songs ("Be True to Your School," [RoviLink="MC"]"When I Grow Up [To Be a Man],"[/RoviLink] "In My Room"), one of surfing songs ("Surfin' Safari," "Surfin' U.S.A.," "Surfer Girl"), one of frat-boy classics ("Dance, Dance, Dance," "Barbara Ann"), and another including selections from their masterpiece Pet Sounds ("God Only Knows," "Sloop John B.," "Wouldn't It Be Nice"). Nearly any compilation on an important artist can be argued, but it's the rare one that covers as many bases and leaves out so few classics as Sounds of Summer: The Very Best of the Beach Boys. ~ John Bush
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Pop - Released June 30, 2017 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res
Let’s go back 50 years. In 1967, the Beach Boys were the kings of American pop. Heavyweights who managed to evolve the thrilling surf music of their early days towards much more complex, daring and crazy skies, most notably with their masterpiece Pet Sounds, released in May 1966. In December 1967, Wild Honey showed yet another facet of Brian Wilson’s gang. This thirteenth album’s sessions, albeit not as essential as Pet Sounds, were intense and disconcerting as evidenced by 1967 - Sunshine Tomorrow. Released in June 2017, it features the album’s comprehensive mix complemented by previously unpublished recording sessions as well as sessions from Smiley Smile and the Lei'd in Hawaii live. In concrete terms, the first CD features Wild Honey’s new stereo mix as well as twenty previously unpublished takes from the album’s recording sessions. The second CD focuses on Smiley Smile, which was released three months prior to Wild Honey, in September of 1967. It comprises ten previously unpublished alternative takes as well as Lei’d In Hawaii. Finally, this second CD features eight live tracks never heard before, as well as a few more oddities, such as Surf’s Up’s 1967 version. Overall, 1967 - Sunshine Tomorrow constitutes an essential piece for Beach Boys fans. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 29, 2017 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

In June 2017, fans of the Beach Boys were treated to an unprecedented treasure: 1967 – Sunshine Tomorrow. A fifty-year-old Holy Grail of sorts, dating from the days when the Californians still dominated the world of American pop. Our heroes were able to take their juvenile surf music to much more complex, daring and crazy places, in particular thanks to their masterpiece Pet Sounds, the great album of 1966. The album Wild Honey from December 1967 would show a whole new side of Brian Wilson's band. The sessions of this thirteenth work were intense and punishing, as shown in 1967 - Sunshine Tomorrow, which is in fact the result of a complete mix of the record being brightened up with unreleased session recordings but also some from Smiley Smile and the live performance Lei'd in Hawaii… Six months later, we get 1967 - Sunshine Tomorrow 2: The Studio Sessions, another treasure reserved for hardcore fans of the Beach Boys. This "suite" is made up of 29 previously-unreleased takes from the same material. It should be noted that this fine collection of gems includes an a capella version of Heroes And Villains, and the previously-unreleased number named Tune L. In short, it's a record aimed exclusively at Beach Boys boffins… © CM/Qobuz
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Pop - Released December 7, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Miscellaneous - Released July 12, 1965 | Capitol

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Beach Boys' Christmas Album features the Beach Boys performing a variety of holiday favorites. Most of the featured songs are well-known, some of the more popular being "Frosty the Snowman," "White Christmas," "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town," and "I'll Be Home for Christmas," among others. Furthermore, there are four songs composed by the Beach Boys -- "Little Saint Nick," "Man With All the Toys," "Santa's Beard," and "Merry Christmas, Baby" -- which begin the album. This mix of favorites and originals makes this a balanced holiday album that should please both Beach Boys admirers and those unfamiliar with the group. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Pop - Released December 7, 2018 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

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Pop - Released January 1, 1964 | Capitol Records

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Miscellaneous - Released December 20, 1965 | Capitol

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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