Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$15.99
CD$11.49

Pop - Released May 20, 2013 | [PIAS]

Hi-Res
CD$17.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1989 | Virgin EMI

Intelligent, tuneful adult pop with terrific female vocals and bluesy slide guitar work. ~ Steve Aldrich
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2000 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Texas always seemed out of place, from the moment they released their debut until the time they hit the big time with White on Blonde in the second half of the '90s. They may have been able to gain momentum from Britpop, but they didn't really belong, since their sensibility was far too soulful and classy, borrowing equally from the smooth soul of the '70s, Americana fascinations, and, in a roundabout way, the sophisti-pop of the '80s. Still, they were professional, stylish, and, thanks to Sharleen Spiteri, sexy, which meant they did make sense in the aftermath of Britpop, even if they were a bit out of step. As the splendid Greatest Hits proves, they could even have made it into the American mainstream if they had received a push on adult alternative pop/rock radio, since they were melodic, classy, and solid. They never were groundbreaking, but they were professionals, and even if this hits collection has a couple run-of-the-mill cuts, at its best -- "Say What You Want," "Black Eyed Boy," "In Our Lifetime" -- it's as good as mainstream post-alternative adult pop gets. For European listeners, certainly a snapshot of the times, and for Americans, this is a good way to get acquainted with a minor treasure. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$8.99

Dance - Released April 1, 2015 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

HI-RES$13.49
CD$9.99

Pop - Released May 20, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

Hi-Res
Scottish pop/rock band Texas return after a lengthy hiatus with their eighth studio album, The Conversation. Embarking on a more country rock-influenced sound, the Sharleen Spiteri-fronted group craft a melodic pop record with plenty of soft notes and radio-friendly hits.
CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1991 | Virgin EMI

Texas is a good name for this band, whose sound is open, brooding and just a bit on the twangy side; if you can imagine a sound somewhere between the dour, minimalist bluesiness of Cowboy Junkies and the yearning, gospel-tinged bombast of early U2, you'll have a good idea what to expect. Singer Sharleen Spiteri has the perfect voice for this kind of thing: it's low-ptched and dark-hued, and is shown off to best effect when she's belting out big, cathartic numbers like the title track and "Why Believe in You." Ally McErlaine is a brilliant slide guitarist who can move from grungy, greasy rock to desolate acoustic Delta blues without missing a beat. It's true that the group still needs to digest its influences a bit -- "Dream Hotel," in particular, sounds like a U2 reject -- but most of the time, Texas does a good job of mapping out its own territory. And this is just their second album, remember. ~ Rick Anderson
CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2005 | Virgin EMI

CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 21, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Jump on Board is Texas' first full-length collection of new material since 2013's The Conversation -- 2015's Texas 25 was an anniversary celebration largely dedicated to re-recordings of old songs -- and if Texas don't push boundaries here, there is some appeal in how they settle into their groove. The biggest shift is how the group accentuates its smooth soul with a heavy dose of subdued disco. It's not enough to refurbish Texas' by now reliable blend of upscale pop and classic soul, but it does provide a glossy new coat of paint to a cozy, familiar environ, which is enough to make Jump on Board a bit of a reassuring listen: it doesn't surprise but it doesn't seem stuck, which gives the album a mellow appeal. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$9.99

Pop - Released May 20, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

CD$12.99

Rock - Released February 3, 1997 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 1993 | Island Mercury

Texas sound a bit like a countrified version of the Pretenders put through a car wash on Ricks Road, to the point where the music is so clean, one's mind just slips around and off of it. There's a squeaky-clean polish to "So Called Friend," a stab at southern twang that doesn't seem genuine...it's a sound best left in a studio and indicative of a band trying too hard to make a hit song. There are simply too many studio effects and fake sounding instruments throughout the album. One imagines the harmonica to be some sort of Casio creation. It's like listening to Cher doing a Dusty Springfield impersonation. "Fade Away" tries so hard to have an aggressive hook that it becomes quite awkward. "Listen to Me" is supposed to be uplifting, but it mostly stumbles around a light beat and strings that go nowhere. Still, it's one of the album's better moments, because it's somewhat restrained. It's not overbearing like most of the other songs. "So in Love With You" starts out quite promising, but devolves into an unbearable din when Sharleen Spiteri reaches for high notes that just won't materialize. "Tired of Being Alone" is quite good; first, because it's almost impossible to ruin an Al Green song, and second, because it's less glossy and more immediate sounding than the rest of the album. It's production is credited to Texas and Kenny MacDonald. The remainder of the album was produced by Paul Fox who seemingly twisted knobs to the point of exhaustion. The production is so overblown that it's reminiscent of a Meredith Brook album. From a lesser band, Ricks Road might be an interesting misstep, but from Texas, who have shown themselves to be capable of much more heartfelt artistic expression. It's an outright shame. Later releases would see a more organic, far more successful approach. The world didn't need another Cowboy Junkies, and, thankfully, Texas didn't continue down the bland path they paved with Ricks Road. The album is best left to fans collecting their entire back catalogue, as it's quite weak from start to finish. The album is a bumpy affair, and it's clearly the wrong route, as the band quickly substituted pop and hip-hop elements for the Southern phoniness displayed here. The album is just one or two decent songs above being classified as drivel. White on Blonde and The Hush are worlds beyond Ricks Road. ~ Tim DiGravina
CD$3.99

Pop - Released August 12, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

CD$0.99

Pop - Released April 8, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

CD$14.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Virgin EMI

Texas took a bit of time to deliver the follow-up to Hush -- an indication that the group was either aware that some fans didn't feel the record was up to snuff, or an indication that the group wasn't quite sure where to go next, a theory bolstered by the appearance of a greatest-hits album -- a traditional measure for a band biding their time. When they finally did release their sixth album, Careful What You Wish For, in the fall of 2003, times had changed: they were no longer a shoo-in for the top of the U.K. charts, nor did they have a U.S. contract. Faced with this situation, the group crafted a very safe, very mature, very British set of soulful adult pop. There are the usual concessions to hipness -- a few of the beats gleam with modernity, there is the de rigueur cameo from rappers -- but this is solidly a smooth, soulful collection of well-crafted pop that intentionally plays it safe. It's not quite as lush as Hush, which highlighted Sharleen Spiteri's sexiness, nor is it the crackerjack, stylish, modern, blue-eyed soul of White on Blonde, which remains their highwater mark. Instead, it's a straight-ahead album that plays to their strengths without exploiting them. In other words, while this is certainly enjoyable as it spins, it doesn't provide many memorable moments. Since the band consciously tried to construct an album that evokes their best work, that's not an entirely surprising result -- they're so intent on delivering a specific sound, they've neglected to spend as much time on the songs -- and it's not a bad result, either, at least on the surface. But once you dig beneath the surface, there's not as much to offer as on White on Blonde, and, for that matter, the surface doesn't glisten as seductively as on Hush, either. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$1.49

Pop - Released November 18, 2013 | [PIAS]

CD$8.99

World - Released January 15, 2019 | Music For you

Zoo

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 13, 2019 | iMD-TexasRecord

Download not available
CD$1.49

Pop - Released November 18, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

Pop - Released September 1, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Download not available

Pop - Released March 28, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Download not available