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Jazz - Released January 1, 1978 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1978 | ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This contains some of Rypdal's jazziest music -- "Per Ulv" even verges on bebop, despite its chattering rhythm box -- alongside the more characteristic free-fall rhapsodies. © Michael P. Dawson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 1, 1987 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | ECM

The unusual trio form of guitar, trumpet, and drums makes for some gorgeous floating sounds. © Michael P. Dawson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1989 | ECM

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Jazz - Released October 1, 1976 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1979 | ECM

An otherworldly soundscape of aching beauty, this album is a must-have for aficionados of any member of this trio. Rypdal's guitar is hauntingly reverbed and distant throughout, though occasionally on "Seasons" he becomes too fond of caterwauling guitar synth. But this is truly an effort of trio fusion, with ineffable pieces like "Den Forste Sne" ("The First Snow") appearing and melting away without any tangible solos or structure. From the opening cymbal strikes of "Sunrise," this album is marked by DeJohnette's best drumming on record; his cymbal sound, pushed to the front and recorded with mikes both above and below the cymbal's bell -- "because that's how the drummer hears it" -- is nothing short of revelatory. Vitous' bass steadies Rypdal's flights of fancy, while his subtle electric piano lines float above. These elements combine most powerfully in "Believer," which builds from atmospheric shimmers of electric piano into a whorl of bass and plaintive guitar set against the dry rasp of resonating cymbals. © Paul Collins /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 26, 2016 | ECM

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Jazz - Released April 29, 2002 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | ECM

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Jazz - Released September 1, 1985 | ECM

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Jazz - Released October 1, 1975 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | ECM

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Eos

Jazz - Released January 30, 1984 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 3, 2006 | ECM

Terje Rypdal has visited some interesting places on his recordings over the past decade. In 2003 there was Lux Aeterna, where Rypdal's band debuted a new classical work -- complete with soprano Åshild Stubø Gundersen and a chamber ensemble -- performed live at a jazz festival. The wonderful Skywards appeared in 1996, featuring string players David Darling on cello and Terje Tønnesen on violin, along with a bassist and electronic keyboards. Rypdal has over 20 records to his credit and is ever-restless, ever-seeking some more crystalline form of expression. Vossabrygg, means Vossa Brew translated. And from the opening moments of the opening track "Ghostdancing," we can hear why: Rypdal's band quotes directly from "Pharoah's Dance," by Miles Davis from the Bitches Brew recording. At over 18 minutes, it's easily the longest track here, and the most frenetic in its exploration of jazz and rock themes with space and tension. It evokes and pays tribute to Davis, but other than that quote, he doesn't ape him or beat the reference into the ground. It's literally a stepping stone to group improvisation. Some of the players here, like Palle Mikkelborg, Jon Christensen, and Bugge Wesseltoft are familiar collaborators, but there are new players here, too, such as son Marius on turntables, electronics, and samples, bassist Bjørn Kjellemyr, organist and electric pianist Ståle Storløkken, and drummer Paolo Vinaccia. Together they create a sublime textural palette for Rypdal's compositions such as the beautiful medley, "Waltz for Broken Hearts" (that references ever so briefly "I Only have Eyes for You"), and "Makes You Wonder." Silence, space, and lyricism haunt the frames of these tunes without ever entering their margins directly. The music hovers, floats, and occasionally touches down, such as when Rypdal's guitar creeps into the frame, only to lift off again gently and purposefully. Elsewhere, Rypdal quotes his own classical works -- Fifth Symphony and "Ineo" -- courtesy of Marius' intensively creative sampling on "Hidden Chapter," "Incognito Traveller," and "Jungeltelegrafen," where drum'n'bass and hip-hop rhythms stride alongside the drummers. But then this is what you have come to expect from Rypdal, the kinds of musical and ambient juxtapositions that seem not make sense elsewhere, but come to the fore and mix nearly seamlessly. "Hidden Chapter"'s choir samples behind a strolling hip-hop beat sequence are layered with Rypdal's edgy guitar playing -- played forwards and looped backwards. The Miles ghost comes back to preside over "That's More Like It," where Wesseltoft's electric piano dances with Kjellemyr's electric bass. The joint never loses its cool, though. That's Nordic Cool to you and me. The solos are brief and never stroll outside the ensemble mold much. Rypdal's collective ideas are well-known in the European jazz world. He's not following a model, but creating one. Everything is interconnected here. The spacey lyricism of Mikkelborg's electronically treated trumpet presides over much of "You're Making It Personal," but here again the composer and bandleader's idea of ensemble holds court. The tune waxes and wanes and fires itself in places with razor-wire lines, fluttering, funky bassing, and smattered trumpet notes wound by electric keyboards. But nothing stands out, it's a hypnotic mass, as is the final cut that whispers to a close this wonderful recording. Vossabrygg is the latest adventure in a stunning, unraveling labyrinth, created by a master explorer. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1971 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 17, 1997 | ECM

With over 20 records under his own name and countless more as a collaborator, band member, or guest, guitarist Terje Rypdal has written and performed virtually in all styles of music that emanate from classical or jazz. As an improviser he is a brilliant thinker and spontaneous composer. As a proper composer he has written everything from pop singles to symphonies. Skywards is a return to jazz proper for Rypdal. He surrounds himself with familiar faces for this date, including cellist David Darling, bassist Palle Mikkelborg, Jon Christensen on drums, and Terje Tønnesen on violin. Also employed are Christian Eggen on piano and electronic keyboards and the additional drumming and percussion talents of Paolo Vinaccia. Rypdal's signature guitar sound, present in every moment of his solo breaks, has a soaring, piercing kind of emotional reach. It is indeed "skyward" in its sound. On this date he marries postmodern jazz (which sometimes harks back to its swinging past) with European improvisation, his own take on classical music (which sounds more like a Norwegian Morricone than Sibelius), and rock music, to create -- if this is possible -- a newly textured instrumental music that is free of all trappings. Nowhere is this more evident than on "Out of This World (Sinfonietta)," where the post-bop jazz in the first movement bleeds into a place where Darling's cello is allowed to break free of its traditional constraints and climb to the heavens along with Rypdal's burning guitar lines, which come as much from Jimi Hendrix as from John McLaughlin. About halfway through, the work moves into the territory of free improvising, before Rypdal brings it back to a processional, theatrical close. What follows are gorgeous, textured ambient balladry, precise salon music, and more free jazz/rock workouts. Skywards is Rypdal's most openly schizophrenic yet satisfyingly ambitious work in many years. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 16, 2010 | ECM

Although at first glance the playlist might suggest that you're in for the kind of noir-inspired, spiky edginess of John Zorn's Spillane, Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal's Crime Scene comes across as pleasantly eccentric and is richly enhanced with all the qualities that make his best work so well worth hearing over and over again. Crime Scene was realized in collaboration with the 20-piece Bergen Big Band, which includes pleasantly disorienting electric instrumentation, a Hammond B-3 organ, and a veritable platoon of brass and reed players, some of whom prove to be bodacious free blowing improvisers. As is the case with much of this man's recorded work, open-minded listeners are sure to encounter a breathtaking range of textured musical expression. Rypdal is characteristically brilliant, sometimes launching into psychotropic guitar passages that may have you recklessly upping the volume for maximum enjoyment. All but one of the 14 selections are credited to Rypdal, the exception being "Parli con Me?!" which has some gnarly sampling by drummer (and composer) Paolo Vinaccia. © arwulf arwulf /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1974 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 14, 2000 | ECM