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Jazz - Released October 7, 2016 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released June 26, 1986 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This contains some of Rypdal's jazziest music -- "Per Ulv" even verges on bebop, despite its chattering rhythm box -- alongside the more characteristic free-fall rhapsodies. ~ Michael P. Dawson
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Jazz - Released April 28, 1986 | ECM

The unusual trio form of guitar, trumpet, and drums makes for some gorgeous floating sounds. ~ Michael P. Dawson
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Jazz - Released May 18, 1987 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 13, 1989 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 26, 2016 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet
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Jazz - Released May 17, 1995 | ECM

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Jazz - Released January 30, 1995 | ECM

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Jazz - Released November 4, 2008 | ECM

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Jazz - Released October 14, 2008 | ECM

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Jazz - Released May 2, 2005 | ECM

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Jazz - Released June 14, 2013 | ECM

Since his earliest solo recordings on ECM, composer and guitarist Terje Rypdal has been a musical shapeshifter, equally comfortable in the genres of modern jazz, contemporary classical, and even rock, integrating them seamlessly whenever he felt it necessary. Recorded in 2003, Melodic Warrior is a 45-minute tone poem performed by the guitarist with the Hilliard Ensemble (who commissioned it) and the Bruckner Orchester Linz conducted by Dennis Russell Davies. It provides limpid vocal settings of Chippewa, Navajo, Pima, and Papago texts, adorned by widely varying orchestral textures and embellished by Rypdal's electric guitar, which alternately, swoops, soars, hums, roils, and crackles in concert with, and in contrast to, both the Hilliards and the orchestra. The composer found in these Native American sources a view of the natural world that mirrored his own. Rypdal's sonic universe here embodies tensions, dissonances, and lyric harmonic considerations that make the sung texts not merely ghostly echoes from a different time and way of life, but instead an aural portrait of a cosmology where nature is the face of the eternal, and man is the participant and witness. It can be heard in the languid meld of the group's singing, and in the spare melodic guitar atop restrained brass, winds, and strings in "Easy Now." Rypdal charts it in the staggered vocal interplay that approaches polyphony in the glorious "Secret File," which moves along a harmonic line that openly engages dissonance in the latter half. It is expressed in even more dramatic tones in the nearly cinematic "My Music Reaches the Sky," where Rypdal plays roiling themes that evoke the old West with rockist intensity atop galloping strings and bleating, lower brass instruments. Balance and an understated grandeur are offered in the glorious "Magician Song," where we hear traces of Glass, Delius, and even Scelsi in the orchestra amid the deeply moving evocations of the text in the Hilliard's fluid harmony. As a whole, this 45-minute composition is among the most transcendent in Rypdal's oeuvre. Its companion is And the Sky Was Colored with Waterfalls and Angels, a five-part work performed by Rypdal with the Wroclaw Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Sebastian Perlowski. It was recorded live at the Jazztopad Festival in 2009. It is much more compressed and internally focused than its predecessor, and evokes the direct inspiration of Penderecki and Ligeti. Its sections are comprised of densely colored tonal clusters that speculatively dialogue with rumbling percussion, often-explosive brass, and restrained but ever-present ambiences from winds and strings. In sections, Rypdal's guitar playing alternates between lyric suggestion and turbulent improvisation. While it may be convenient to label this album "classical crossover," it would be a disservice. Melodic Warrior offers two distinct aspects of Rypdal's vision, and they prove to be challenging 21st century works that reference history both cultural and musical, yet point toward an exploratory and holistic horizon. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released May 17, 1995 | ECM

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Jazz - Released June 22, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon ECM

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Jazz - Released December 8, 2017 | ECM

Booklet
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Jazz - Released March 24, 1997 | ECM

With over 20 records under his own name and countless more as a collaborator, band member, or guest, guitarist Terje Rypdal has written and performed virtually in all styles of music that emanate from classical or jazz. As an improviser he is a brilliant thinker and spontaneous composer. As a proper composer he has written everything from pop singles to symphonies. Skywards is a return to jazz proper for Rypdal. He surrounds himself with familiar faces for this date, including cellist David Darling, bassist Palle Mikkelborg, Jon Christensen on drums, and Terje Tønnesen on violin. Also employed are Christian Eggen on piano and electronic keyboards and the additional drumming and percussion talents of Paolo Vinaccia. Rypdal's signature guitar sound, present in every moment of his solo breaks, has a soaring, piercing kind of emotional reach. It is indeed "skyward" in its sound. On this date he marries postmodern jazz (which sometimes harks back to its swinging past) with European improvisation, his own take on classical music (which sounds more like a Norwegian Morricone than Sibelius), and rock music, to create -- if this is possible -- a newly textured instrumental music that is free of all trappings. Nowhere is this more evident than on "Out of This World (Sinfonietta)," where the post-bop jazz in the first movement bleeds into a place where Darling's cello is allowed to break free of its traditional constraints and climb to the heavens along with Rypdal's burning guitar lines, which come as much from Jimi Hendrix as from John McLaughlin. About halfway through, the work moves into the territory of free improvising, before Rypdal brings it back to a processional, theatrical close. What follows are gorgeous, textured ambient balladry, precise salon music, and more free jazz/rock workouts. Skywards is Rypdal's most openly schizophrenic yet satisfyingly ambitious work in many years. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released November 16, 2000 | ECM

A magnificant effort that combines crushingly powerful rock/jazz ("Over Bierkerot" is a killer) with long, brooding electric ruminations, it was originally a double album; one track has been left off the CD. ~ Michael P. Dawson
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Jazz - Released April 16, 2010 | ECM

Although at first glance the playlist might suggest that you're in for the kind of noir-inspired, spiky edginess of John Zorn's Spillane, Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal's Crime Scene comes across as pleasantly eccentric and is richly enhanced with all the qualities that make his best work so well worth hearing over and over again. Crime Scene was realized in collaboration with the 20-piece Bergen Big Band, which includes pleasantly disorienting electric instrumentation, a Hammond B-3 organ, and a veritable platoon of brass and reed players, some of whom prove to be bodacious free blowing improvisers. As is the case with much of this man's recorded work, open-minded listeners are sure to encounter a breathtaking range of textured musical expression. Rypdal is characteristically brilliant, sometimes launching into psychotropic guitar passages that may have you recklessly upping the volume for maximum enjoyment. All but one of the 14 selections are credited to Rypdal, the exception being "Parli con Me?!" which has some gnarly sampling by drummer (and composer) Paolo Vinaccia. ~ arwulf arwulf
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Jazz - Released October 9, 2007 | ECM

An excellent sampler of Rypdal's music, it includes two cuts from his superb (but currently unavailable) early-'70s albums. ~ Michael P. Dawson
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Jazz - Released November 4, 2002 | ECM