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Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released June 1, 1973 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released April 1, 1970 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released August 28, 2000 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released June 22, 2015 | UMC-Decca

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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Rock - Released August 1, 1969 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released November 11, 1971 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released July 16, 2001 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released December 1, 1970 | Chrysalis Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

"I'm Going Home" from Ten Years After's previous release put them on the charts, at least in the U.K. (the band's U.S. breakthrough was at Woodstock a year after its release), but the four-piece was already experimenting with ways to expand their basic boogie rock template. Stonedhenge was the result, as producer Mike Vernon helped steer the band into a more jazz- and blues-oriented direction. That's especially evident in the swinging "Woman Trouble," but this set is generally more prone to broadening the sound without losing TYA's basic concept. It doesn't always gel -- the four short pieces that feature each musician alone on their instrument is an interesting idea that ends up as a distraction -- yet the album boasts some terrific performances by a group that was hitting its peak. Canned Heat, who TYA supported in America and who were also trying to push their own boogie envelope, were a big influence, born out by the very Heat-sounding "Hear Me Calling." Alvin Lee keeps his fleet fingers in check, preferring to work his style into a more organic fusion. Tracks such as the creeping "A Sad Song" successfully build tension without the need for speedy guitar solos. The eight-minute "No Title" takes the basic TYA blueprint but slowly creates a moody atmosphere for three minutes until Lee cranks out a terse, loud extension on its main riff that sets the stage for Chick Churchill's eerie organ solo. The quartet and their producer also experimented with primitive panning and tape manipulation to impressive results. The closing "Speed Kills" returns TYA to its basics, perhaps as a way to let its existing fans know they can still churn out the rocking when needed. The album was remastered and expanded in 2002 by adding informative liner notes from drummer Ric Lee, four extra tracks including the tiresome, 15-minute "Boogie On," and an edited single version of "I'm Going Home," U.K. artwork (the initial U.S. edition was an embarrassing botch job), and pristine sound from the original tapes. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 1, 1969 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1968 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

"I'm Going Home" from Ten Years After's previous release put them on the charts, at least in the U.K. (the band's U.S. breakthrough was at Woodstock a year after its release), but the four-piece was already experimenting with ways to expand their basic boogie rock template. Stonedhenge was the result, as producer Mike Vernon helped steer the band into a more jazz- and blues-oriented direction. That's especially evident in the swinging "Woman Trouble," but this set is generally more prone to broadening the sound without losing TYA's basic concept. It doesn't always gel -- the four short pieces that feature each musician alone on their instrument is an interesting idea that ends up as a distraction -- yet the album boasts some terrific performances by a group that was hitting its peak. Canned Heat, who TYA supported in America and who were also trying to push their own boogie envelope, were a big influence, born out by the very Heat-sounding "Hear Me Calling." Alvin Lee keeps his fleet fingers in check, preferring to work his style into a more organic fusion. Tracks such as the creeping "A Sad Song" successfully build tension without the need for speedy guitar solos. The eight-minute "No Title" takes the basic TYA blueprint but slowly creates a moody atmosphere for three minutes until Lee cranks out a terse, loud extension on its main riff that sets the stage for Chick Churchill's eerie organ solo. The quartet and their producer also experimented with primitive panning and tape manipulation to impressive results. The closing "Speed Kills" returns TYA to its basics, perhaps as a way to let its existing fans know they can still churn out the rocking when needed. The album was remastered and expanded in 2002 by adding informative liner notes from drummer Ric Lee, four extra tracks including the tiresome, 15-minute "Boogie On," and an edited single version of "I'm Going Home," U.K. artwork (the initial U.S. edition was an embarrassing botch job), and pristine sound from the original tapes. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Hip-O (UC)

Since Ten Years After's albums weren't stand-alone classics, this double CD of their prime years is the best bet for those who like the band but don't want to sit through some pretty mediocre and monotonous stuff to get to the best bits. The 26 cuts are pretty well chosen, including naturally their most famed songs: "I'm Going Home" (the live Woodstock version), "I'd Love to Change the World," and the British hit "Love Like a Man." Even as it draws from the cream of their work, it can't quite make the argument for them as a major band, but it does show that they were a more versatile act than many would remember. There are some reasonable pop- and folk-rock-flavored songs from the pen of Alvin Lee; a fair amount of jazz influence from time to time, as on "Me and My Baby" and "Woman Trouble"; a song ("50,000 Miles Beneath My Brain") that borrows rather too liberally from the Rolling Stones, "Sympathy for My Devil"; and even a bit of Grateful Dead-like vocal harmony on "Hear Me Calling." There's still, of course, quite a bit of blues-rock, flash guitar, and boogie, which sound better when broken up by more subdued and varied cuts and also benefit from the wise decision not to include too many covers. It's also nice that the collection includes both sides of two 1968 singles, although those were released on LP in the early '70s as part of Alvin Lee & Company. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 2, 1970 | Chrysalis Records

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Rock - Released June 22, 2015 | UMC-Decca

Recorded live in a small London club, Undead contains the original "I'm Going Home," the song that brought Ten Years After its first blush of popularity following the Woodstock festival and film in which it was featured. However, the real strength of this album is side one, which contains two extended jazz jams, "I May Be Wrong, But I Won't Be Wrong Always" and Woody Herman's "Woodchopper's Ball," both of which spotlight guitarist Alvin Lee's amazing speed and technique. Side two is less interesting, with an extended slow blues typical of the time, a drum solo feature, and the rock & roll rave-up of "I'm Going Home." © Jim Newsom /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 1, 1974 | Chrysalis Records

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Blues - Released October 20, 2017 | Butler Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Recorded live in a small London club, Undead contains the original "I'm Going Home," the song that brought Ten Years After its first blush of popularity following the Woodstock festival and film in which it was featured. However, the real strength of this album is side one, which contains two extended jazz jams, "I May Be Wrong, But I Won't Be Wrong Always" and Woody Herman's "Woodchopper's Ball," both of which spotlight guitarist Alvin Lee's amazing speed and technique. Side two is less interesting, with an extended slow blues typical of the time, a drum solo feature, and the rock & roll rave-up of "I'm Going Home." © Jim Newsom /TiVo