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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2012 | Carpark Records

In Limbo, the title of TEEN's Carpark debut, reveals that the band is nothing if not self-aware. Fronted by former Here We Go Magic member Teeny Lieberson, the group has sonic ties to many of its other female-driven contemporaries; while shades of the Vivian Girls' girl group-fueled noise pop, the tribal electronics of Telepathe, and Warpaint's psychedelic vistas can be heard on this set of songs, TEEN have an in-betweenness that ends up making them unique. Similarly, over the course of In Limbo, the band is often caught between making the perfect pop song and reaching for expansive bliss. The album's first half shows they have the pop side nailed: "Better" kicks things off with Lieberson's jubilant insistence that she'll "do it better than anybody else," and her slightly rough alto and unabashed confidence -- something in short supply among 2010s indie rockers of either gender -- are fresh and rousing. On "Come Back"'s slightly kitschy exotica-pop, she sings "Look at me, I'm a prize," while sitting on her doorstep waiting for her lover's return, and this mix of boldness and vulnerability echoes artists like Liz Phair, Karen O, and Chrissie Hynde in spirit if not in sound. Meanwhile, "Electric"'s frosty dance-punk pays homage to foremothers like the Mo-dettes and Romeo Void. In Limbo boasts a fuller, more varied sound than TEEN's homemade, self-released debut, Little Doods, and the group enlisted Spacemen 3's Sonic Boom to flesh things out. His support and influence becomes felt more and more as the album unfolds, especially on "Charlie," a girl group slow dance number shot into the stars, and on the ultra-psychedelic "Why Why Why," a piece of cosmic sprawl that also recalls Kendra Smith's projects in the early and mid-'80s. By the end of In Limbo, Lieberson and crew have sacrificed some of their distinctive spunk for "Roses & Wine" and "Fire"'s transcendent grooves and harmonies, which are undeniably lovely but perhaps less intriguing than what came before them. At the very least, In Limbo shows that the band can do a lot of things well, and while this set of songs isn't exactly scattered, TEEN's ambitions lead them to be less cohesive than they might have been had they picked one direction and stuck with it. Still, having too many enticing options on where to go next isn't a problem troubling too many bands, and hearing TEEN caught in the middle of them is one of In Limbo's many pleasures. ~ Heather Phares

Electronic/Dance - Released April 26, 2016 | Carpark Records

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The Way and Color was a promising album, in both senses of the word: it built on In Limbo's potential with heady songs about the first blush of love and lust. On Love Yes, TEEN deliver on those promises in unexpected ways, exploring the real-life consequences of romantic fantasies. Though the band's experimental mix of R&B, synth pop, and indie rock sounds almost as alluring as it did on The Way and Color, Love Yes' subject matter is often anything but. "Tokyo" begins the album with a portrait of a bored husband in search of "younger skin"; from there, TEEN sink their teeth into all kinds of difficult choices and situations, from the guilt-laden '80s slow jam "Another Man's Woman" to "Example"'s frosty hypocrisy to the overpowering longing and jealousy of "Gone for Good." These complex emotions are a perfect match for TEEN's fondness for complex arrangements, making for one-of-a-kind songs like "Animal," which sounds equally feral and self-aware in its mix of noisy keyboards and sweet vocals. As on The Way and Color, Love Yes' uptempo songs are the most immediately winning. The brash, jabbing "All About Us" tells off a passive-aggressive "nice" guy with electrifying results, while "Free Time"'s teasing hooks and brassy, psychedelic coda balance TEEN's pop and experimental leanings perfectly. Occasionally, the band's ambitious musicianship overwhelms these songs, but Love Yes proves itself a worthy sequel to The Way and Color. Equally sensual and challenging, it's the work of a band capable of commitment as well as grand gestures. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2015 | Carpark Records

TEEN's debut, Little Doods, is a lo-fi home recording made and released by Teeny Lieberson in 2011 under the TEEN moniker before an official lineup was established for the band. After settling in as an all-female combo and signing with Carpark Records, the tracks "Better," "Huh," and "Why Why Why" were reworked for 2012's In Limbo. Other tracks include the slow-strolling, organ-backed "Just Another" and the trippy "Sleep Is Noise." Little Doods got a label release by Carpark in the summer of 2015 that included a bonus demo of "Come Back." ~ Marcy Donelson

Alternative & Indie - Released July 6, 2012 | Carpark Records

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