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Country - Released August 23, 2019 | Fantasy

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A country star since 1972, when she was just 13, Tanya Tucker shines bright on her 25th studio album — produced with great reverence by Shooter Jennings and Brandi Carlile, and featuring an abundance of songs written by the latter. Indeed, the most apt description is that "While I'm Livin'" sounds like a Tanya Tucker record in the hands of Brandi Carlile: at turns tough and tender, moody and simple, and rocking and deep in its country roots. Tucker's voice wears years of hard living, but it's beautiful: sassy and strutting on the honkytonk "I Don't Owe You Anything," strong and independent on the hymn-like "Seminole Wind Calling." She even evokes Tom Waits on the spare "High Ridin' Heroes," utterly convincing as she reminunates on going from "Ridin' that hot streak" to "fallin' off the wagon and under the wheels." When she turns that voice to a cover of "The House That Built Me," made famous by Miranda Lambert but told here from the mother's point of view rather than the child's, it's nothing less than stunning. © Qobuz
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Country - Released August 11, 1987 | Columbia Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2000 | Capitol Nashville

By some distance the biggest thing to ever come out of Denver City, Texas, Tanya Tucker took the country world by surprise with her 1972 debut smash, "Delta Dawn"; not since Brenda Lee's mid-1950s records had an adolescent country singer sounded so little like a gimmick. Unfortunately, following a healthy string of country hits, an ill-advised move into rock & roll, starting with 1978's TNT, began a period of personal and professional turmoil. For most of the 1980s, Tucker was as well known for her tempestuous affair with Glen Campbell, which regularly landed the pair in the gossip pages with tales of chemically-fueled public spats. However, by the late '80s, Tucker had mounted an impressive comeback with the hits documented on this 20-track compilation. Recorded for Capitol Records between 1986 and 1997 and including one previously unreleased track--the slinky "Black Water Bayou"--these songs are crisp, soulful mainstream country with a slight R&B influence in Tucker's better-than-ever vocals. Fair warning: the version of "Delta Dawn" included here is a 1991 re-recording, not the original 1972 hit single.
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Country - Released June 30, 2009 | Time-Life Music

The turn Tanya Tucker takes on 2009's My Turn, her first album in seven years, is her own distinctive take on 12 country tunes, all popularized by male singers. Tucker isn't quite gender-bending the way Lyle Lovett did when he sang "Stand by Your Man," but rather taking these songs directly, sounding as tough as any guy as she saunters her way through "Crazy Arms" and "Lovesick Blues." While it's true that Pete Anderson's dry, unadorned production gives this muscle and grit, perhaps the most sympathetic setting Tucker has had in decades, the triumph is all Tanya's, as she digs deep into these songs, finding new meaning within them and proving that a great covers album need not reinterpret the sound of a song in order to reinvent it. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released January 1, 1991 | Capitol Nashville

Ballads ("Down to My Last Teardrop," "Trail of Tears") are belted by the best female country singer of her generation. ~ Mark A. Humphrey
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Country - Released January 1, 1992 | Capitol Nashville

Edgier and more consistent than What Do I Do with Me, Can't Run from Yourself runs the range of Tucker's abilities, from the slow-blues burn of Marshall Chapman's "Can't Run from Yourself" to the wistful melancholy of Hugh Prestwood's "Half the Moon." A rollicking duet with Delbert McClinton on "Tell Me About It" is matched by the fine romance of "Two Sparrows in a Hurricane"; which one you like best will depend strictly on personal preferences. Switch one song on each side, and you've got a side of rockers and a side of ballads. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Nashville

As the title says, Greatest Hits 1990-1992 contains all of the biggest hits Tanya Tucker had in the early '80s, including the number two singles "Down to My Last Teardrop," "(Without You) What Do I Do with Me," "Some Kind of Trouble," and "Two Sparrows in a Hurricane," among others. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released January 1, 1989 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released February 17, 1998 | Columbia Nashville

Included are ten of 's greatest hits, from "Delta Dawn" and "The Man That Turned My Mama On" to "You Are So Beautiful." Though there would've been plenty of room for additional hits, this disc isn't a bad value when bought at a cheap price. ~ John Bush
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Country - Released August 23, 2019 | Fantasy

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Country - Released January 1, 1995 | Capitol Nashville

Considering that even at 13 years old, Tanya Tucker sounded like a world-weary adult, it's no surprise that in 1994, firmly ensconced in middle age, her vocals had gained a profound sense of life experience that few other singers of any genre can approach. Thankfully, on Fire to Fire Tucker doesn't even bother with the sort of boot-scootin' modern fluff that would underutilize her wonderfully sandpapery voice. Rather, she concentrates primarily on tear-jerking country ballads and mature pop, wringing so much emotion out of each word that she often recalls late-'70s/early-'80s era George Jones. Producer Jerry Crutchfield wisely keeps the music minimal throughout, allowing Tucker's voice to carry the tunes. Occasionally, Crutchfield's pop side gets the best of him (resulting in songs that sound like they'd be a bit more comfortable on a Don Henley album), but luckily the music never overwhelms the message. Standouts include "Come in Out of the World," the title track (a duet with Willie Nelson), and "Love Will," which moves jauntily along with a nice Muscle Shoals-inspired groove. Fire to Fire is an adult album in the best sense of the word. There are no barnburners or instant chart classics here, just thoughtful songwriting, flawless (if sometimes uninspired) musicianship, and one of the all-time greatest voices in country music. ~ Pemberton Roach
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Pop - Released April 19, 2011 | Legacy Recordings

This is the album that started it all. Tanya Tucker was 13 when she struck pay dirt with her debut single, "Delta Dawn" by Larry Collins. To say that in the 21st century Tucker would still be considered a major force in country music over 30 years later would have been considered laughable at the time. But nonetheless, Tucker has joined Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, and Dolly Parton as one of country music's true divas and has had a longer-lasting time in the spotlight than any of them. "Delta Dawn" is one of the greatest songs in country's canon, both in terms of Tucker's performance and Larry Collins' songwriting. But there is more to this debut album than that track. "New York City Song" by Larry Hargrove feels like Harry Nilsson wrote it. The cover of Hank Williams' "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" is not only credible, it's deeply moving. Tucker's second single is here too, "The Jamestown Ferry," and the Jerry Reed classic "Smell the Flowers." Rounding out the collection -- in an era where, with the exception of Merle Haggard's records, country albums were singles with lots of filler -- are George Richey's fine "Soul Song" and "He's All I Got." Tucker at 13 was in full possession of her throaty voice, though producers hadn't yet learned how to make it work to its fullest capacity. Nonetheless, this is one of the most auspicious debuts in popular music history. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released February 21, 2006 | Columbia - Legacy

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Country - Released January 1, 2000 | MCA Nashville

Given that it features just 11 songs, 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Tanya Tucker actually does a pretty good job at covering the highlights of her mid-'70s to mid-'80s work. Singles like "San Antonio Stroll," "Here's Some Love," "Texas (When I Die)," and "Can I See You Tonight" trace her development from a purely country artist into a country-rock crossover star. Though best-ofs like 20 Greatest Hits offer a deeper and more comprehensive look at Tucker's music, The Millennium Collection is more than adequate for the most casual fans. ~ Heather Phares
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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Nashville

Soon dips into some average material and over-synthesized production. Fortunately, Tucker pulls out of the dive thanks to two ballads - "Soon" and "Silence is King" - strong enough to rise above the treatment, and a pair of toothy tracks - "Sneaky Moon" and "A Blue Guitar" - that get back to the resonating riffs of the opener. ~ Roch Parisien
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Country - Released January 1, 1988 | Capitol Nashville

More pop-country, but it's still Tanya. ~ Mark A. Humphrey
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Country - Released January 1, 1997 | Capitol Nashville

On her 30th album, Tanya Tucker turns in an inspired, tough performance that offers a series of songs reflecting her life's many travels and travails. A musical firebrand on record since she was 14, Tucker has ridden out the scandals, the glories, and the excesses to become one of country music's true jewels. Produced by Gregg Brown to coincide with the issue of her autobiography, Nickel Dreams, Complicated is a cleanly produced record of fine songs and great musical performances from some bona fide studio legends, such as Hargus Robins, Pat Buchanan, Reggie Young, Billy Joe Walker, and the incomparable Fats Kaplin. What matters most, of course, is Tucker's performance, and she is in devastatingly fine voice here. The material ranges from the sublime to the merely adequate, but it's all delivered so passionately it doesn't matter. A true standout is the Dulaney and Jones-penned "Little Things," with its gorgeous guitar fills and Tucker's completely convincing delivery about not needing the finer things in life. The opener, "Ridin' Out the Heartache" by Cathy Majeski, has slide guitars and fiddles cascading around Robins' piano in the opening bars before Tucker enters with an acoustic guitar, delivering an anthem of independence and leaving nowhere for parts unknown to get past the blues. The Allen/Jones ballad "It Hurts Like Love" contains Tucker's finest gritty vocal in a ballad. It seemingly is at odds until she gets to the refrain and it all becomes clear. And then there's her read of Harlan Howard's singing two-step mariachi-infused "I Don't Believe That's How You Feel," which should erase any doubt that Tucker can still sing traditional music with verve, originality, and passion. "Love Thing" is funky backbeat-driven country, with Tucker just behind the beat making it come out like that "feeling inside" with slide guitar underlining every phrase. Of course, it should sound this way -- Delbert McClinton wrote it. Nice and greasy. And then there's the bluesy country-rock of the title track, written by Pat McLaughlin, that is equal parts honky tonk and rockin' blues. In all, this is a dynamite record, full of all the right stuff; with Tucker in full-on gritty voice over all that slick production, it's a study in country contradiction that works in spades. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released August 1, 1987 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

This fully mature artist is uncompromisingly gritty in the sanitized new Nashville. ~ Mark A. Humphrey
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Country - Released January 1, 1990 | Capitol Nashville

For some mysterious reason, Tanya Tucker's Tennessee Woman sounds out of time for its 1990 year of release. Some of this disc has the feel of a late-'70s outlaw recording with those guitars popping all over the place, pianos dropped in all the right spots, and tempos ranging from the hardcore 4/4 two-step to the rock & roll waltz. But that's not a bad thing. Tucker is in great voice here, turning in a deck of fine songs with a couple of real standouts. In fact, starting with the first two tracks, Paul Overstreet's "Take Another Run" and the Garvin/Shapiro-penned "Shotgun," the set is off with a real bang. In particular, the latter has an old Western feeling in the refrains and minor-key signature that is deceptively ushered in with a near classical piano line before the acoustic guitars and Telecasters come flowing through the middle of a true cowgirl's love song. There's a duet with T. Graham Brown on the cover of Foster & Lloyd's "Don't Go Out." On it, two singers grittily plead with one another not to betray one another. It's a duet with plenty of country soul despite the outrageously slick production. The medley of the Tucker/Gary Stewart-scripted title track with "Ben's Song" is one of those killer honky tonk love songs made regal by the cascading guitars and rim shots. The hottest track, though, is "It Won't Be Me," which is Tucker doing her best (albeit reinterpreted) Dwight Yoakam. It kicks and makes the listener move. Paul Kennerley's "Walking Shoes" is another neo-trad outlaw song; with its road theme, slippery guitar feel, and cut-time honky tonk beat, it's more rock & roll than country, but it never leaves the country idiom. It wouldn't be hard to imagine Waylon Jennings or Hank Williams, Jr. recording this one. A fine effort. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Nashville

Love Songs is a budget-priced collection of Tanya Tucker's most popular love ballads from the late '80s and early '90s, as well as a few rarities ("I'm In Love and He's In Dallas" and "Your Love Amazes Me") that were previously only included on her eponymous box set. It's a nice collection, even if it is a little brief. However, it isn't a true hits compilation, so it's not as valuable or useful as some of her other collection. Casual fans should stick with the greatest hits sets, but for the budget-minded, Love Songs is a fun sampler. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine