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Country - Released August 23, 2019 | Fantasy

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A country star since 1972, when she was just 13, Tanya Tucker shines bright on her 25th studio album — produced with great reverence by Shooter Jennings and Brandi Carlile, and featuring an abundance of songs written by the latter. Indeed, the most apt description is that "While I'm Livin'" sounds like a Tanya Tucker record in the hands of Brandi Carlile: at turns tough and tender, moody and simple, and rocking and deep in its country roots. Tucker's voice wears years of hard living, but it's beautiful: sassy and strutting on the honkytonk "I Don't Owe You Anything," strong and independent on the hymn-like "Seminole Wind Calling." She even evokes Tom Waits on the spare "High Ridin' Heroes," utterly convincing as she reminunates on going from "Ridin' that hot streak" to "fallin' off the wagon and under the wheels." When she turns that voice to a cover of "The House That Built Me," made famous by Miranda Lambert but told here from the mother's point of view rather than the child's, it's nothing less than stunning. © Qobuz
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Country - Released October 16, 2020 | Fantasy

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Country - Released October 18, 1994 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

While Tanya Tucker is the subject of this four-CD retrospective, she should have her own complete Bear Family box. No woman has done more for the modern tradition in both its excellence and its excess than Tucker. There are few, with the exceptions of Loretta Lynn, Tammy Wynette, and Dolly Parton, who can be credited with being a true singing "stylist." She embodies the true meaning of the term "country diva." The box compiled by Tucker and longtime producer Jerry Crutchfield begins with songs like her 1972 smash hit of Larry Collins' "Delta Dawn," originally recorded when she was still 13, and her follow-up singles "The Jamestown Ferry," "What's Your Mama's Name Child," Curly Putman's "Blood Red and Going Down," and the song that brought David Allan Coe to the attention of the country music establishment, "Would You Lay With Me (In a Field of Stone)." But there's a catch -- these are not the originals, but rather newly recorded versions made by Capitol for Greatest Hits Encore, an entire collection of these tracks. The rest of the set is comprised of Tucker's recordings for Capitol. There are 58 tracks of pure reckless, restless country soul. Here in that unmistakably throaty voice are "Strong Enough to Bend," "As Long as There's a Heartbeat," "Girls Like Me," "If Your Heart Ain't Busy Tonight," "The Thunder Rolls," and "We Don't Have to Do This." And most of what's here is very fine indeed, including the unreleased tracks, of which there are six, because Tucker gives 100 percent each time she records. But for a performer who has accomplished as much as she has, she deserves a far more accurate representation of her career than this one. Look out for Raven Records' two-fers instead © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released February 17, 1998 | Columbia Nashville

Included are ten of 's greatest hits, from "Delta Dawn" and "The Man That Turned My Mama On" to "You Are So Beautiful." Though there would've been plenty of room for additional hits, this disc isn't a bad value when bought at a cheap price. © John Bush /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1989 | Capitol Nashville

This particular collection of Tanya Tucker's Greatest Hits is pulled from her revamped career, recorded between 1986-1991 for Liberty. Many of these songs appealed to both pop and country audiences, achieving crossover popularity. Some of the highlights from this ten-cut, budget-priced collection include "One Love at a Time," "Strong Enough to Bend," "Love Me Like You Used To," and "If It Don't Come Easy." © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Country - Released February 20, 2006 | Columbia - Legacy

This umpteenth greatest-hits collection by Tanya Tucker is different in three respects from all the others. The first is that it contains 16 tracks instead of ten or 13. Secondly, it really is a hits collection, arranged chronologically but also by actual chart position. Finally, it contains three Arista singles from 1982 in addition to the 13 Columbia string of hits that ended in 1975. No one can argue with the music here. It's all top-notch Nashville class, from "Delta Dawn" through to her version of Van McCoy's "Baby I'm Yours." In between are stops at David Allan Coe's "Would You Lay with Me (In a Field of Stone)" and "Greener Than the Grass (We Laid On)," Bobby Braddock's "I Believe the South Is Gonna Rise Again," and Curly Putman's "Old Dan Tucker's Daughter" and "Blood Red and Goin' Down." This is as good as it gets for Tucker, and a solid introduction to one of the hottest chart-makers country music had to offer in the 1970s and early '80s. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1992 | Capitol Nashville

Edgier and more consistent than What Do I Do with Me, Can't Run from Yourself runs the range of Tucker's abilities, from the slow-blues burn of Marshall Chapman's "Can't Run from Yourself" to the wistful melancholy of Hugh Prestwood's "Half the Moon." A rollicking duet with Delbert McClinton on "Tell Me About It" is matched by the fine romance of "Two Sparrows in a Hurricane"; which one you like best will depend strictly on personal preferences. Switch one song on each side, and you've got a side of rockers and a side of ballads. © Brian Mansfield /TiVo
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Country - Released August 11, 1987 | Columbia Nashville

No matter how far Tucker's come the last 20 years, it all comes back to "Delta Dawn," "What's Your Mama's Name?," and the other hillbilly-gothic hits of her youth. Producer Billy Sherrill is best known for his work with George Jones and Tammy Wynette, but how he turned an underage, waifish Southwest homegirl into a singer to make old boys sweat is surely his most notable, if unsettling, career achievement. © Dan Cooper /TiVo
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Country - Released June 30, 2009 | Time-Life Music

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Country - Released January 1, 2000 | MCA Nashville

Given that it features just 11 songs, 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Tanya Tucker actually does a pretty good job at covering the highlights of her mid-'70s to mid-'80s work. Singles like "San Antonio Stroll," "Here's Some Love," "Texas (When I Die)," and "Can I See You Tonight" trace her development from a purely country artist into a country-rock crossover star. Though best-ofs like 20 Greatest Hits offer a deeper and more comprehensive look at Tucker's music, The Millennium Collection is more than adequate for the most casual fans. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 2000 | Capitol Nashville

By some distance the biggest thing to ever come out of Denver City, Texas, Tanya Tucker took the country world by surprise with her 1972 debut smash, "Delta Dawn"; not since Brenda Lee's mid-1950s records had an adolescent country singer sounded so little like a gimmick. Unfortunately, following a healthy string of country hits, an ill-advised move into rock & roll, starting with 1978's TNT, began a period of personal and professional turmoil. For most of the 1980s, Tucker was as well known for her tempestuous affair with Glen Campbell, which regularly landed the pair in the gossip pages with tales of chemically-fueled public spats. However, by the late '80s, Tucker had mounted an impressive comeback with the hits documented on this 20-track compilation. Recorded for Capitol Records between 1986 and 1997 and including one previously unreleased track--the slinky "Black Water Bayou"--these songs are crisp, soulful mainstream country with a slight R&B influence in Tucker's better-than-ever vocals. Fair warning: the version of "Delta Dawn" included here is a 1991 re-recording, not the original 1972 hit single. © TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1995 | Capitol Nashville

Considering that even at 13 years old, Tanya Tucker sounded like a world-weary adult, it's no surprise that in 1994, firmly ensconced in middle age, her vocals had gained a profound sense of life experience that few other singers of any genre can approach. Thankfully, on Fire to Fire Tucker doesn't even bother with the sort of boot-scootin' modern fluff that would underutilize her wonderfully sandpapery voice. Rather, she concentrates primarily on tear-jerking country ballads and mature pop, wringing so much emotion out of each word that she often recalls late-'70s/early-'80s era George Jones. Producer Jerry Crutchfield wisely keeps the music minimal throughout, allowing Tucker's voice to carry the tunes. Occasionally, Crutchfield's pop side gets the best of him (resulting in songs that sound like they'd be a bit more comfortable on a Don Henley album), but luckily the music never overwhelms the message. Standouts include "Come in Out of the World," the title track (a duet with Willie Nelson), and "Love Will," which moves jauntily along with a nice Muscle Shoals-inspired groove. Fire to Fire is an adult album in the best sense of the word. There are no barnburners or instant chart classics here, just thoughtful songwriting, flawless (if sometimes uninspired) musicianship, and one of the all-time greatest voices in country music. © Pemberton Roach /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Nashville

Love Songs is a budget-priced collection of Tanya Tucker's most popular love ballads from the late '80s and early '90s, as well as a few rarities ("I'm In Love and He's In Dallas" and "Your Love Amazes Me") that were previously only included on her eponymous box set. It's a nice collection, even if it is a little brief. However, it isn't a true hits compilation, so it's not as valuable or useful as some of her other collection. Casual fans should stick with the greatest hits sets, but for the budget-minded, Love Songs is a fun sampler. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1991 | Capitol Nashville

Ballads ("Down to My Last Teardrop," "Trail of Tears") are belted by the best female country singer of her generation. © Mark A. Humphrey /TiVo
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Country - Released May 21, 2020 | Pecos Muzik

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Country - Released August 23, 2019 | Fantasy

Tanya Tucker eased into a quasi-retirement in the 21st century, recording rarely after 2002's Tanya -- seven years later, she released the fine covers album My Turn -- and making the occasional appearance, but otherwise keeping a low profile. A meeting with Shooter Jennings changed that. Longtime acquaintances, the pair struck up a professional relationship and Jennings brought in singer/songwriter Brandi Carlile, who was fresh off the Grammy-winning success of 2018's By the Way, I Forgive You, a record co-produced by Shooter Jennings. His intent was to have Carlile contribute a new song, but she and her longtime collaborators Tim and Phil Hanseroth wrote nearly an album's worth, giving Tucker's 2019 comeback both shape and fire. Carlile and Jennings decided not to bother with either the country mainstream or its Americana counterpart, choosing to reconnect to the flinty, defiant spirit that lay in the heart of Tucker's classic records of the '70s and '80s. Everybody involved is too smart to opt for a straight revival of a past era. Instead, While I'm Livin' evokes the past in how it relies on strong, burnished songs which cannily play on Western archetypes and Tucker's personal history. On the closing "Bring My Flowers Now," the only song co-written by Tucker, she musters something close to an aural autobiography, but While I'm Livin' isn't intended as a memoir: it aims for a greater, universal truth. Tucker's voice carries appealing scars accumulated over the years, yet she hasn't lost a whit of her pitch or force. This vocal power puts her squarely at the center of While I'm Livin', even when the songs bear Carlile's distinct, careful imprint. Carlile may be writing toward Tucker's myth, but she and the Hanseroths don't treat her with kid gloves; they allow her humor, soul, and sensuality to shine forth. Jennings and Carlile also direct Tucker toward a few outside covers, including the rousing "Hard Luck" and "The House That Built Me," a Tom Douglas & Allen Shamblin song popularized by Miranda Lambert, that add texture and deepen the emotional undercurrents flowing through the record. When combined with the Carlile/Hanseroth originals, these tunes paint a portrait of a mighty artist who has been through a lot but is fearless about the future. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1988 | Capitol Nashville

More pop-country, but it's still Tanya. © Mark A. Humphrey /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1986 | Capitol Nashville

Given her predilection for switching record labels, it's more than interesting to look at the debut albums Tanya Tucker issued for each. They are always undeniably strong, consistent, and soulful. Girls Like Me is no exception, produced by Jerry Crutchfield and featuring a tight collection of songs that reflects Tucker's considerable experience as a vocalist and a country music icon. From the Paul Overstreet and Paul Davis-penned opener, "One Love at a Time," which could almost be interpreted as autobiographical, to the beautiful swanky pop of Davis' "Fool, Fool Heart," Tucker shows both sides of her complicated amorous life. But it's when the shimmering synthesizer introduces the Karen Brooks/Matraca Berg-authored title track that Tucker turns in her most inspired performance on the set. Beginning slow and sultry as an "other side of the tracks" story, it shimmers with a desperate but simmering passion that reflects the dreams and wreckage of "passion on the beach" through the eyes of a "paperback dreamer." Again, as she relates the tale of finding a love whose intensity she couldn't sustain, Tucker is baring her own soul. She seeks the "long and lonely streets" before the bridge and screaming guitar usher in a moment of hope, a desperate one that in fact refuses to say die. And then there's Marshall Chapman's tough "Daddy Long Legs," which sits deeply in Tucker's interpretive groove. The track is part Bobbie Gentry, part Tucker, and part Delbert McClinton; it drips funky blues and steamy honky tonk. Girls Like Me is a winner from end to end and one of the best efforts of the '80s for Tucker. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Nashville

As the title says, Greatest Hits 1990-1992 contains all of the biggest hits Tanya Tucker had in the early '80s, including the number two singles "Down to My Last Teardrop," "(Without You) What Do I Do with Me," "Some Kind of Trouble," and "Two Sparrows in a Hurricane," among others. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 19, 1972 | Legacy Recordings