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Alternative & Indie - Released January 11, 2019 | Concord Music Group

$16.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2006 | Concord Music Group

One has to hand it to Taking Back Sunday. Three albums in, they are now pretty much experts at re-creating their own sound, so much so that they can essentially make the same album repeatedly -- but you know, different -- yet still manage to rock hard enough underneath verbose lyrics that even those who notice the unabashed similarities to past releases just won't care. And yeah, obviously similar-sounding albums would be expected and somewhat desired from the same band. But really, it's quite obvious they take the "if it's not broke, don't fix it" motto straight to their emotive hearts. Since their debut Tell All Your Friends -- the album that broke TBS out as front-runners in the independent emo-rock scene of the early 2000s -- the band has managed to regurgitate their time-tested approach of layering multiple vocals spewing embittered lyrics over guitar-driven up-and-down dynamics on each subsequent release. Only by 2006, they've managed to influence so many upstarts along the way, their once-unique formula seems almost commonplace. With that being said, the band's songwriting has admittedly matured within that mold, honing their sound into one fit for arenas. Louder Now is an apt title for a super-tight, aggressive album that falls somewhere between their last two, tapping the heartfelt vigor of Tell All Your Friends in order to give Where You Want to Be a swift, square kick in the pants. "What's It Feel Like to Be a Ghost?" opens with terse riffing that soon surges with a composed feeling of frenzy over a thick, dirty bassline as Adam Lazzara declares "Are you up for, are you up for this?" Following suit, "Liar (It Takes One to Know One)" doesn't miss a beat, rocking out amid trademark, animated wordplay between Lazzara and guitarist Fred Mascherino. "Twenty-Twenty Surgery" simply soars with the richest vocals on the album, and "My Blue Heaven" (whose beginning vaguely resembles Third Eye Blind's "Wounded") brings in the strings for added effect. Louder Now benefits from Eric Valentine's clean production touch that isn't overly slick, giving the band plenty of breathing room to ponder, crunch, and explode at will with seamless elasticity. Taking Back Sunday is a prime example of a band not needing a drastic makeover every few years to remain relevant to their audience. However, even if Louder Now brings the mosh-pit fun ready to be embraced by new and old fans alike, an attempt to push themselves further would be more than welcomed. Regardless, the album seems like it could finally boost TBS to the My Chemical Romance-level of airwave domination -- so watch out. ~ Corey Apar
$12.99

Rock - Released March 26, 2002 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

$14.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 29, 2009 | Concord Music Group

Like so many of their emo peers, Taking Back Sunday gets increasingly poppy as their career winds on, a reflection of their advancing age as much a shifting musical direction brought on by the departure of guitarist Fred Mascherino. His absence has left vocalist Adam Lazzara firmly in charge, a subtle shift in power referenced in the title of their fourth album, New Again, so dubbed because the group feels like a new, different group now that Matthew Fazzi has filled Mascherino's shoes. And that assessment is correct, at least as far as the band's attitude goes: this is brighter and bigger in every regard, never shying away from arena-filling hooks, an attitude that turns slower numbers like "Where My Mouth Is" into a genuine power ballad without a trace of irony. This large, cavernous sound camouflages the lingering emo elements which largely surface in the angst-mining lyrics, as well as the occasional bellow, and even if this lack of stridency may alienate some longtime followers, this gleaming pop-punk makeover is the band at its most immediate and easy to enjoy. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 21, 2006 | Concord Music Group

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2009 | Concord Music Group

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 24, 2011 | Concord Music Group

Booklet
Reuniting the lineup from their debut album, 2002’s Tell All Your Friends, Taking Back Sunday seek to recapture the fire of that early lineup on their eponymous fifth album. Nearly a decade later, we find the post-hardcore outfit a little older and a little wiser, but sounding no worse for the wear, with John Nolan and Shaun Cooper sliding back into the lineup as if they had never left. The pair’s seamless return works in the band’s favor, reinvigorating their sound with the chemistry that brought them to the national stage without being a tired retread of things they’ve already done. In a lot of ways, Taking Back Sunday is the sophomore album the band never had. Songs like “El Paso” and “You Got Me” find the band both refining and expanding their sound, offering up tighter songs without sacrificing intensity in the process. The big surprises on the album come by way of the highly danceable “Money (Let It Go),” where deep fuzz bass and stomping drums blast their way through a garage-influenced dancefloor scorcher, and “This Is All Now,” which drifts back and forth between a verse anchored by an angular, Dismemberment Plan-style beat and a classic, singalong-style chorus. Normally, you’d expect a band to gain new members in order to inject this kind of life into their sound, and with three albums and seven years passing between Nolan and Cooper’s exodus and return, it’d be an easy point to argue that they almost are new members. What their return does bring, though, is that unquantifiable “getting the band back together” feeling and all of the excitement that comes with old friends getting back together to do what they do best. ~ Gregory Heaney
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 27, 2004 | Concord Records, Inc. (UMG Account)

$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 19, 2018 | Concord Music Group

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 20, 2007 | Concord Music Group

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 13, 2010 | Concord Music Group

Their second live album, Live from Orensanz, gives fans a different look at the band than they may be used to, stripping off the distorted guitars and studio polish with an acoustic set. Featuring the lineup from New Again, the album captures the band in a more intimate setting than their last live outing, trading the outdoor spectacle of the Bamboozle festival for the more contemplative Angel Orensanz Center, a 150-year old synagogue on New York’s Lower East Side. As a band that lives or dies on making an emotional connection with their listeners, Taking Back Sunday are able to really capitalize on the setting, connecting with their fans in a way that’s immediately apparent by the voracious applause and ubiquitous singalongs. The songs carry the same infectious momentum as they do in the studio, but the addition of violin and cello to songs like “My Blue Heaven” gives the song an almost cinematic drama. Live from Orensanz will be a welcome offering for Taking Back Sunday fans, allowing them to see favorites like “MakeDamnSure” in a different light with a live album that goes above and beyond fan service, delivering a unique performance that’s sure to please. ~ Gregory Heaney
$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 24, 2011 | Concord Music Group

Reuniting the lineup from their debut album, 2002’s Tell All Your Friends, Taking Back Sunday seek to recapture the fire of that early lineup on their eponymous fifth album. Nearly a decade later, we find the post-hardcore outfit a little older and a little wiser, but sounding no worse for the wear, with John Nolan and Shaun Cooper sliding back into the lineup as if they had never left. The pair’s seamless return works in the band’s favor, reinvigorating their sound with the chemistry that brought them to the national stage without being a tired retread of things they’ve already done. In a lot of ways, Taking Back Sunday is the sophomore album the band never had. Songs like “El Paso” and “You Got Me” find the band both refining and expanding their sound, offering up tighter songs without sacrificing intensity in the process. The big surprises on the album come by way of the highly danceable “Money (Let It Go),” where deep fuzz bass and stomping drums blast their way through a garage-influenced dancefloor scorcher, and “This Is All Now,” which drifts back and forth between a verse anchored by an angular, Dismemberment Plan-style beat and a classic, singalong-style chorus. Normally, you’d expect a band to gain new members in order to inject this kind of life into their sound, and with three albums and seven years passing between Nolan and Cooper’s exodus and return, it’d be an easy point to argue that they almost are new members. What their return does bring, though, is that unquantifiable “getting the band back together” feeling and all of the excitement that comes with old friends getting back together to do what they do best. ~ Gregory Heaney

Alternative & Indie - Released February 14, 2010 | Condon Music Group

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