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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 1, 2016 | Hardly Art

Lost Time, Tacocat's third album, is the Seattle quartet's crispest, most focused yet. Their punky pop is delivered with a punch, the guitars have some serious bite, and the rhythm section hits hard. Their previous album, NVM, was a fun bubblegum confection; Lost Time is punk to the core. It's tough to be more hardcore than hating the weekend, it's seriously outsider to (quite correctly) extol the merits of Scully when everyone still loses their stuff over Mulder, and banning R.E.M. from night swimming parties is exactly the right thing to do if you want to keep it real. They also take time out to quickly bash dudes who feel the need to explain everything to women, talk about girls who love horses (over a chugging glam rock beat), and quit the Internet -- all with loud guitars, quick tempos, and lots of energy. Anyone who really liked the poppier aspects of NVM shouldn't be too worried though; there's plenty of shiny pop in their gritty punk. The record sounds like a collection of singles, each as catchy as the last. Their vocal harmonies and sticky guitar riffs, and Emily Nokes' powerful vocals, make everything sound good, with tracks like "FDP," "I Hate the Weekend," and the super-fun "Horse Grrls" sounding like mixtape staples. The handclap-heavy, almost lilting "Leisure Bees" is an album highlight and ends the too-short album with style. Adding more noise and toughness to their sound on Lost Time was a genius move, taking an already very good band and pointing it toward greatness, or at the very least helping Tacocat make one of the most fun punk-pop albums around. ~ Tim Sendra
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NVM

Alternative & Indie - Released February 14, 2015 | Hardly Art

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 26, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Sub Pop Records

Tacocat's fourth album, and first for Sub Pop, This Mess Is a Place is the result of years of playing together as a band; refining their sound and stripping away everything but the biggest hooks, catchiest melodies, and brightest, shiniest surfaces. The quartet worked again with Lost Time's producer Erik Blood, and for the first time tip their balance of punk and pop decidedly in the direction of the latter. It makes for an almost giddy listening experience as the band romps from one bouncy tune to the next. Slick synths are added here and there, the vocals harmonies shimmer like hot pavement, and the band sound tighter and more powerful than ever. They tap into their inner Go-Go's and Josie Cotton quite often, as tracks like "The Joke of Life" and "The Problem" hit that same sweet spot of light and punchy that those artists did in their prime. While the music may encroach on giddiness, the often downcast lyrics create a contrast between sound and content that gives the record a much deeper impact than previous works. There aren't too many jokes to tell when the world is falling apart around you, and the band do a fine job detailing the challenges of the era while making sure to offer some hope as well. The super poppy "Hologram" is an empowering singalong, "Grains of Salt" is a loping, danceable slice of advice pop, "New World" is an insistent power punk track with a hopeful vision, and "Rose Colored Sky" has the kind of expansive, wide-screen chorus that the band hasn't delivered before but certainly nails here. The whole album feels like a big step forward, both musically and emotionally. Tacocat were a fun, sometimes great band before; This Mess Is a Place is their most consistent, most impressive, and best record yet and anyone looking for thoughtfully catchy modern guitar pop could do a whole lot worse. ~ Tim Sendra

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2016 | Hardly Art

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 12, 2016 | Hardly Art

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Pop - Released March 13, 2012 | Hardly Art