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Alternative & Indie - Released January 10, 2014 | Atlantic Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2020 | Fantasy

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 18, 2019 | Fantasy

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The most interesting songs on Switchfoot's expertly crafted 11th studio album, 2019's Native Tongue, are the ones that the band wrote for themselves. Sure, we get a handful of big-swinging rock numbers like the philosophically Zen opener "Let It Happen," the bright-toned fan appreciation song "All I Need," and the effusive midtempo anthem about letting God take control with his mercy "The Strength to Let Go." These are all catchy, well-produced songs full of grand chorus hooks and an underlying sense of spirituality that will most likely appeal to the band's longtime fans and anyone who jumped on board with 2003's The Beautiful Letdown. Furthermore, with the band having passed the 20-year mark (and gone on indefinite hiatus in 2017 after promoting Where the Light Shines Through), it's impressive that they are able to recapture much of their initial alt-rock buoyancy here. That said, it's fun to hear the band's primary songwriters, lead singer/guitarist Jon Foreman and his brother bassist Tim Foreman, explore what feel like more personal influences. To these ends, they draw upon the Beatles' woozy, '60s-style Baroque psychedelia on "Dig New Streams," pair with M83 vocalist Kaela Sinclair on the synthy, sweet-toned "The Hardest Art," and draw upon Harvest Moon-era Neil Young for the rootsy, piano-driven "Wonderful Feeling." Similarly, they evince Paul Simon's '70s playfulness with the jaunty acoustic singalong "We're Gonna Be Alright." Elsewhere, they dabble in Maroon 5-esque pop on the Ryan Tedder-co-write "Voices" and the hip-hop-inflected "Take My Fire." Native Tongue is a nicely cohesive album that lives up to the band's two-decades-long reputation for delivering heartfelt, uplifting pop/rock. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released December 25, 2007 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Released October 31, 2008 | Columbia - Legacy

Anyone claiming to be even the slightest fan of modern rock was well acquainted with "the Foot" by the time this greatest-hits anthology was released. Even 12 years and six highly acclaimed albums after they first got together, Switchfoot still feel like the band you grew up with -- that memorably personal source of musical comfort that you always want to have with you. It's hard to picture how far Jon Foreman and his surfer buddies would come in that space of time -- over five million albums sold, three discs hitting the Billboard Top 20, and a string of modern rock radio hits. A handful of those hits -- mostly from the band's commercial breakthrough, The Beautiful Letdown -- appear on practically every alternative rock fan's "best songs of the 21st century" playlist. And Switchfoot wouldn't be Switchfoot without proving to their fans that they have stayed grounded despite all the accolades. To do this, they included a generous helping of 18 songs on The Best Yet (plus 14 videos on the Deluxe Edition), almost a third of which were culled from their early years on the re:Think label. Listeners who only know "Dare You to Move" or "Meant to Live" will be pleasantly surprised by this disc, which includes the band's latest track from the Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian soundtrack, "This Is Home." A fitting title indeed; The Best Yet still makes you feel at home. It is an endearing collection from one of the most well-known modern rock outfits this side of the post-grunge movement. © Jared Johnson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Fantasy

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Pop - Released December 28, 2006 | Columbia

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Rock - Released July 8, 2016 | Concord Vanguard

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Switchfoot's tenth studio album, 2016's Where the Light Shines Through, is an exuberant, passion-filled effort that finds the band balancing the many various sounds they've investigated throughout their career. From their early punk-pop days, to the breakthrough anthemic sound of 2003's The Beautiful Letdown, to the '80s-influenced new wave and the electronica of their mid-2000s work, Switchfoot have always found new and divergent ways to translate their catchy, spiritually inspired pop/rock songs. Produced by John Fields (The Beautiful Letdown, Nothing Is Sound, Oh! Gravity.) Where the Light Shines Through is a warm, robust album. Lead singer Jon Foreman has proven himself an ambitious and stylistically far-reaching songwriter who keeps one ear firmly grounded in heartfelt rock balladry, and one ear lightly attuned to the current pop landscape. It's that balance that helps Where the Light Shines Through feel at once like a classic Switchfoot album and one not dissimilar to works by slightly younger acts like JR JR and Foster the People. Based on the funky lead single "Float," one might have expected an album of bass-heavy dance-rock, and there are certainly tracks like that here, including the driving, infectious "If the House Burns Down Tonight" and the punky, Adam Ant-sounding "Healer of Souls." The band also reveal a surprising hip-hop influence, as on the bluesy G. Love-esque "Bull in a China Shop," and the dramatic "Looking for America," featuring rapper Lecrae. Primarily, much of the album soars on Foreman's knack for mixing earnest lyricism and big, catchy choruses as he does on "Shake This Feeling," the buoyant, clubby anthem "When Was the Last Time," and the country-rock-tinged title track. As he sings on "Float," "Turn it up so I can feel it/Loud enough so I can get near it." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 23, 2011 | Atlantic Records

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If 2009's Hello Hurricane was a return to the straightforward alt rock anthems of Switchfoot's 2003 breakthrough The Beautiful Letdown, then 2011's Vice Verses delivers more of the same with a few production left-turns thrown in. Ballyhooed as a kind of showcase for the band's rhythm section, Vice Verses nonetheless still features lead singer/songwriter Jon Foreman and the passionate, rock uplift the Christian-centric band is known for. Much like their similarly inclined predecessor U2, Switchfoot have grown somewhat experimental in their middle age while never totally relinquishing the rock anthem mantle. To these ends, we get the melodic dance-rocker "The Original," the epic drama of the light acid rock anthem "The War Inside," and the sprawlingly romantic "Restless." Similarly engaging is the hummable electro-ballad "Thrive" and the intimate and yearning acoustic title track. Ultimately, Vice Verses finds Switchfoot in a creatively energized and committed state of mind that should please longtime fans and produce more than a few ear-catching moments. Also included here is a second disc featuring a live concert the band gave at Center Stage in Atlanta. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 3, 2009 | Atlantic Records

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Pop/Rock - Released September 13, 2005 | Columbia

With over two million copies sold of their 2003 breakthrough Beautiful Letdown, Switchfoot have finally found the universal audience they've been searching for since 1999's New Way to Be Human. Their CCM inspirations had always been more curious than self-righteous -- "We're all in this together, Jonathan Foremanwould sing in his lyrics, "so let's figure out what it all means" -- and on Letdown, those impulses meshed ably with slick post-grunge guitars and the production of John Fields. It's the same formula on Nothing Is Sound, Switchfoot's 2005 effective, but too calculated follow-up. Fields is back in the producer's seat, and Foreman is still striving to separate honesty from commodities and find a place for his soul to stand up straight. On songs like "Blues," "Shadow Proves the Sunshine," and "Happy Is a Yuppie Word" his vocals mix Bono's plaintive wail with the laconic surfer drawl of fellow Southern Californian Mark McGrath. He conveys his passion for key topics like life, death, sex, and redemption. But Foreman's also careful not to lose that laid-back edge, so we know there's still an easygoing beach kid under that washed-out blonde mane. Together with Foreman, Switchfoot succeeds incredibly well with this meaningful innocuousness. Vestiges of Nirvana remain in their melodic crunch, but there's no teeth, and nothing threatening. Instead the wrangled yells and lurching notes of "Politicians," "Lonely Nation," and "Easier Than Love" are balanced by hopeful verses, tinkling programming, and layers of airy reverb. With Nothing Is Sound Switchfoot have realized that with universal success comes being all things to all people. So they're prayerful -- "Please Lord don't look the other way...Shine on me," goes "Shadow Proves the Sunshine" -- but they're also just plain likeable, giving "We Are One Tonight" the easygoing flair of the Gin Blossoms. Foreman probes the big issues with a personal touch, his band keeps the beat steady and true, and it sounds like nothing and everything at the very same time. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | Rethink

Introspective, probing lyrics define Switchfoot's sophomore effort, New Way to Be Human, which Charlie Peacock produced for his re: think label. In the 1990s, Peacock was best known for working with Christian rock and pop/rock artists -- he co-wrote Amy Grant's "Every Heartbeat" and had produced Sarah Masen, Michelle Tumes, and other Christian singers. Switchfoot's lyrics also deal with spiritual concerns, but there's nothing preachy or exclusionary about this CD. Alternative pop/rock songs like "Incomplete," "Under the Floor" and "Let That Be Enough" (all of which were written or co-written by Switchfoot singer/guitarist Jonathan Foreman) deal with trying to find meaning and purpose in life -- the lyrics really stem from Foreman's introspection and self-examination, not a desire to force any particular religion down the listener's throat. One of the best songs on the album is "Company Car," which questions materialism and is almost Hindu-ish in its outlook. Not perfect but intelligent and generally appealing, New Way to Be Human is an album that fans of 1990s' alternative rock can appreciate, whatever their religious views may be. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 18, 2019 | Fantasy

The most interesting songs on Switchfoot's expertly crafted 11th studio album, 2019's Native Tongue, are the ones that the band wrote for themselves. Sure, we get a handful of big-swinging rock numbers like the philosophically Zen opener "Let It Happen," the bright-toned fan appreciation song "All I Need," and the effusive midtempo anthem about letting God take control with his mercy "The Strength to Let Go." These are all catchy, well-produced songs full of grand chorus hooks and an underlying sense of spirituality that will most likely appeal to the band's longtime fans and anyone who jumped on board with 2003's The Beautiful Letdown. Furthermore, with the band having passed the 20-year mark (and gone on indefinite hiatus in 2017 after promoting Where the Light Shines Through), it's impressive that they are able to recapture much of their initial alt-rock buoyancy here. That said, it's fun to hear the band's primary songwriters, lead singer/guitarist Jon Foreman and his brother bassist Tim Foreman, explore what feel like more personal influences. To these ends, they draw upon the Beatles' woozy, '60s-style Baroque psychedelia on "Dig New Streams," pair with M83 vocalist Kaela Sinclair on the synthy, sweet-toned "The Hardest Art," and draw upon Harvest Moon-era Neil Young for the rootsy, piano-driven "Wonderful Feeling." Similarly, they evince Paul Simon's '70s playfulness with the jaunty acoustic singalong "We're Gonna Be Alright." Elsewhere, they dabble in Maroon 5-esque pop on the Ryan Tedder-co-write "Voices" and the hip-hop-inflected "Take My Fire." Native Tongue is a nicely cohesive album that lives up to the band's two-decades-long reputation for delivering heartfelt, uplifting pop/rock. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2011 | Atlantic Records

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Rock - Released July 8, 2016 | Concord Vanguard

Switchfoot's tenth studio album, 2016's Where the Light Shines Through, is an exuberant, passion-filled effort that finds the band balancing the many various sounds they've investigated throughout their career. From their early punk-pop days, to the breakthrough anthemic sound of 2003's The Beautiful Letdown, to the '80s-influenced new wave and the electronica of their mid-2000s work, Switchfoot have always found new and divergent ways to translate their catchy, spiritually inspired pop/rock songs. Produced by John Fields (The Beautiful Letdown, Nothing Is Sound, Oh! Gravity.) Where the Light Shines Through is a warm, robust album. Lead singer Jon Foreman has proven himself an ambitious and stylistically far-reaching songwriter who keeps one ear firmly grounded in heartfelt rock balladry, and one ear lightly attuned to the current pop landscape. It's that balance that helps Where the Light Shines Through feel at once like a classic Switchfoot album and one not dissimilar to works by slightly younger acts like JR JR and Foster the People. Based on the funky lead single "Float," one might have expected an album of bass-heavy dance-rock, and there are certainly tracks like that here, including the driving, infectious "If the House Burns Down Tonight" and the punky, Adam Ant-sounding "Healer of Souls." The band also reveal a surprising hip-hop influence, as on the bluesy G. Love-esque "Bull in a China Shop," and the dramatic "Looking for America," featuring rapper Lecrae. Primarily, much of the album soars on Foreman's knack for mixing earnest lyricism and big, catchy choruses as he does on "Shake This Feeling," the buoyant, clubby anthem "When Was the Last Time," and the country-rock-tinged title track. As he sings on "Float," "Turn it up so I can feel it/Loud enough so I can get near it." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 8, 2019 | Fantasy

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 3, 2009 | Atlantic Records

By the time Switchfoot returned to autonomy with 2009's Hello Hurricane, the post-CCM quintet had learned so much from the rat race of their grueling Columbia years their new batch of songs appeared too effortless to be true. The multiplatinum glories of 2003's The Beautiful Letdown, while never replicated, taught the group to grow comfortable in its modern-rock skin -- to accept its status as a band for the people. That explains why Hello Hurricane is almost devoid of surprises and offers exactly what the people want: an assemblage of straight-ahead rock anthems, free from left-of-center experiments, bouncy power-pop numbers, or obligatory balladry. All of the above were at some point part of Switchfoot's line of attack, but here they fall by the wayside in exchange for no-nonsense anthems of purpose and faith. That thematic line has become the norm for Jon Foreman, who still appears to be on a lifelong quest to find meaning in a meaningless world ("Free"), decry the futility of the here and now ("Needle and Haystack Life"), and inspire the world to live for something more ("Mess of Me"). For all this familiarity, Foreman, perhaps inspired by the openness of his own solo material, seems more forthright than ever about his convictions -- he still won't refer to the subject of his devotion by name, but emotive slow-burners like "Your Love Is a Song," "Sing It Out," and "Always" are clear-cut about who's on the receiving end of his entreaties. Like other colleagues who started out in the CCM ghetto and moved on to the big leagues only to later scale back and start all over again, Switchfoot appears to have found its footing -- Hello Hurricane is by far the San Diego rockers' most natural, effortless outing to date. © Andree Farias /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 8, 2016 | Fantasy Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 10, 2014 | Atlantic Records

San Diego's Switchfoot made a splash in the early and mid-2000s with such hit singles as "Dare You to Move" and "Stars." Those songs showcased Switchfoot's anthemic, passionate guitar-based rock sound and helped secure their position as one of the most successful Christian rock bands on the secular pop scene. Since then, Switchfoot have released several albums that found them experimenting with various pop sounds that moved them away from the straightforward punk-influenced rock of their earlier work. Switchfoot's ninth studio album, 2014's Fading West, continues in this varied creative direction with a batch of songs inspired by the band's love of surfing. Recorded in tandem with a worldwide tour of well-known surf spots, captured on the 2013 Fading West documentary, the album is an upbeat, uplifting affair. The band, once again centered around lead singer/songwriter Jon Foreman, returns to both its musical roots and its beach and surf culture roots. The result is an album that at once pushes Switchfoot's sound forward, while displaying the band's long-running knack for melodic, catchy pop songs. Essentially, Fading West finds the group splitting the difference between the anthemic guitar-based uplift of 2003's The Beautiful Letdown and the more post-punk/dance-rock-inclined approach of 2006's Oh! Gravity. Tracks like "Say It Like You Mean It" and "Who We Are" bring to mind Achtung Baby-era U2, while other cuts like "Slipping Away" and "Let It Out" fit nicely alongside work by more contemporary bands like OneRepublic. Ultimately, much like riding a surfboard from wave to wave, Fading West moves from earnest ballads to dancey, groove-oriented cuts to breezy, sunshine-soaked rockers with an easy, athletic flow. © Matt Collar /TiVo