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Country - Released January 1, 1994 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1989 | Capitol Nashville

A fabulous, truly surprising debut, this album firmly plants one foot in the past and the other in the Nashville mainstream. The best songs here come from country legends. Merle Haggard penned the powerhouse title cut "My Sweet Love Ain't Around" came from Hank Williams, and "I Want To Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart" was an old Patsy Montana tune. The new stuff was pretty danged good, too: "Cross My Heart," written by Verlon Thompson and Kye Fleming, was the album's highest-charting single. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released January 1, 1991 | Capitol Nashville

Employing such A-listers as Vince Gill, Beth Nielsen Chapman, and Mark O'Connor helped make this a strong outing, but Suzy Bogguss' appealing girl-next-door approach, her choice to straddle the fence between contemporary and traditional C&W and her perfectly pitched voice are what helped this album be the catalyst for making her a household name among country music fans. Whether she's handling the parting of mother and daughter in "Letting Go," the sorrowful heartbreak of "Part of Me," or the spunky "Outbound Plane," she expresses such sincerity you never doubt an emotion. Additionally, not many mainstream artists have the nerve to take on a subject that doesn't involve boy-girl love. But Bogguss' choice in the compelling title track shows just how savvy she is. Concerning envy of success between friends, Cheryl Wheeler's "Aces" is smart and hits just the right nuances without ever being as cloying or manipulative as many adult contemporary singles are in their need to be touching. Immediately following that emotional twister is the album's second strongest cut, "Someday Soon." A twangy, yearning tune of a girl longing for a boy who loves "his damned old rodeo" as much as he loves her, Bogguss elicits youthful hope that hasn't leaned toward jaded frustration quite yet. Not many singers can make riding the rodeo sound like the most romantic thing in the world, but that's what makes Bogguss an artist and not just a vocalist. ~ Bryan Buss
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Country - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Nashville

Suzy Bogguss runs the gambit as far as the material she elected to use on this project is concerned. From great tunes by Cheryl Wheeler, Bobbie Cryner, and Julie Miller to run-of-the mill country-pop songs that elicit a response of little more than a yawn, Bogguss does almost nothing to excite her listening audience either way. With a few exceptions, her little-girl voice is ineffectual and mild-mannered. However, Bogguss does seem to come to life on a tune she co-wrote with Matraca Berg and husband Doug Crider called "Somebody to Love." She also exhibits a little fire on "Take Me Back," the Julie Miller tune that stands out because of its bluegrass charm. Assisted along the way by friends Patty Loveless, Trisha Yearwood, Alison Krauss, Kathy Mattea, Harry Stinson, and guitarman Dan Dugmore, this should have been a landmark recording for the likable singer who thrilled fans when she worked with cowboy bard Michael Martin Murphy and Nashville legend Chet Atkins. ~ Jana Pendragon
CD$11.49

Country - Released January 1, 1994 | Capitol Nashville

Capping off the first wave of her career, this compilation spotlights Suzy Bogguss' clear, emotive voice on adult contemporary-flavored ballads ("Letting Go"), plucky country ("Outbound Plane"), and even yodeling odes to the rodeo ("I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart"). Her strengths have always been her consummate vocals and strong material, and this album shows both off to their fullest extent. "Aces" covers the dynamics of a friendship taxed by success; "Drive South" is sexy and carefree; and only Bogguss could make lyrics like "he loves his damned old rodeo/as much as he loves me" swooningly romantic in "Someday Soon." But as much territory as this covers, letting every facet of her talent shine, this is a compilation of a talent in growth, only hinting at what she has. ~ Bryan Buss
CD$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Nashville

In the three years between the release of Suzy Bogguss' fourth studio album of new material, Something Up My Sleeve, and her fifth, Give Me Some Wheels, she released a greatest-hits album and a duet album with Chet Atkins (Simpatico); her record company, Liberty, was reconfigured into Capitol Nashville; and she took time out to start a family. None of those factors may be as important as the sheer passage of time for an artist who had achieved a moderate level of success in a New Traditionalist vein and now faces a tough post-Garth country music environment defined by a new crop of female singers. Give Me Some Wheels is a sturdy album of well-performed, consistently written country songs. The title track, which Bogguss co-wrote with Matraca Berg and Gary Harrison, is a satisfying statement of purpose, and the album's second single, "No Way Out," is a pleasing uptempo love song. But neither became hits ("She Said, He Heard" would have made a better single choice), and the album was a commercial disappointment. If it had been released two years earlier, it probably would have done better, but coming back to a new climate in Nashville, Bogguss needed to make a bolder or more accomplished album than this to keep from losing ground. ~ William Ruhlmann
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Country - Released January 1, 1992 | Capitol Nashville

This sounded like one of those white-bread pop albums folks occasionally try to pawn off as country -- until you started listening to the lyrics. Voices in the Wind may have been bigger on string sections than twin fiddlers, but Bogguss' choice in covers remained just off-center enough to be exciting, with Cheryl Wheeler's "Don't Wanna" and Lowell George's "Heartache." She revived John Hiatt's "Drive South" for a hit. The more risky material -- especially the bleary-eyed blues of "Eat at Joe's" and the troubled alcoholic haze of Bogguss' own "In the Day" -- shows why the Country Music Association gave her its Horizon Award just before the release of this album. ~ Brian Mansfield
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Country - Released January 1, 1990 | Capitol Nashville

Under the wing of producer and new label-head Jimmy Bowen, Bogguss relinquished her cowboy's sweetheart role and began recording more polished records that often burnished singer/songwriter material. This album didn't do so well, though: it produced only two weakly performing singles, "Under the Gun" and "All Things Made New Again." ~ Brian Mansfield