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Jazz - Released January 23, 2015 | MPS

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Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

This CD finds veteran violinist Stephane Grappelli joined by bassist Niels Pedersen and guitarists Philip Catherine and Larry Coryell for a memorable tribute to Django Reinhardt. Grappelli has recorded many Reinhardt memorial albums through the years but this one is particularly special for both Coryell and Catherine go out of their way to display the unexpected influence that Reinhardt has had on their styles. The guitarists contribute a song apiece and also enjoy playing seven compositions co-written by Django and Grappelli. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 5, 2020 | Label Ouest

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

At the time of this 1962 session, Stéphane Grappelli had not yet recaptured the fame that he achieved during his prewar partnership with Django Reinhardt, though he was hardly idle at the time. This meeting with guitarist Pierre Cavalli, bassist Guy Pedersen, and drummer Daniel Humair covers many tunes previously recorded by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, but also delves into more recent works like John Lewis' elegant tribute to the late guitarist ("Django") and Sonny Rollins' catchy bop vehicle "Pent-Up House," both of which became a part of Grappelli's repertoire for the remainder of his career. The violinist is in good form, but not quite as inspired as he would be once his star rose a few years later. Cavalli's brash style of playing is no match for later Grappelli collaborators such as Joe Pass, Martin Taylor, or Marc Fosset. In any case, this CD from the bargain-priced Jazz in Paris series is definitely worth the money. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | Fantasy Records

By the time the 71-year-old Stephane Grappelli made this live trio recording with guitarist Joe Pass and bassist Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen, his legacy as the greatest of all jazz violinists was firmly in place. Granted, that made him first in a fairly short line of colleagues -- other than Joe Venuti and Stuff Smith, who else was there to consider? (Jean-Luc Ponty doesn't count.) But it's hard to imagine another player, regardless of virtuosity, ever conveying the same sense of swing and simple joie de vivre that Grappelli does with virtually every note. Nor does it hurt that his accompanists on this album are among the finest in their fields; Orsted Pedersen plays with a solidity and rhythmic power that are enough to make you forget the absence of a drummer, while Pass slides effortlessly between unobtrusive chordal backup and bravura soloing. The program itself is practically a Grapelli greatest-hits collection -- "It's Only a Paper Moon," "Crazy Rhythm," "How Deep Is the Ocean," etc. -- which makes this disc a perfect introduction to his art for anyone looking for a good place to begin. Highly recommended. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 8, 1993 | Savoy

Stephane Grappelli may have given up standing during concerts late in life as a concession to his health, but at the age of 82, he still swung like mad with the best of them, as heard in this 1990 concert recorded in Tokyo. Accompanied by guitarist Marc Fosset and bassist Jean-Philippe Viret, with the addition of accordion player Marcel Azzola on a few selections, the violinist devotes a good part of his show to the expected standards from the 1930s and 1940s. Highlights include a swinging "Just One of Those Things," a delightful "Honeysuckle Rose" and a loping "Ol' Man River," the latter which adds ripples supplied by Azzola's accordion, until the dam breaks and the second half of the song comes on like a spring flood. The inevitable tribute to his late partner Django Reinhardt comes in the form of a cooking medley of the guitarist's "Nuages" and "Daphne." But Grappelli was also open to exploring newer works. He treats the audience to a bossa nova flavored take of Stevie Wonder's "You Are the Sunshine of My Life" (opening with a bit of pizzicato violin) and a fleet interpretation of Sonny Rollins' "Pentup House," featuring a great series of trade-offs between the violinist and Azzola. This is easily one of the better Stephane Grappelli CDs from late in his career. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1990 | Milestone

Violinist Stephane Grappelli, although a veteran of the swing era, has always kept an open mind toward newer styles even while he has retained his own sound and veteran repertoire. This duet set with pianist McCoy Tyner might seem unlikely at first glance but it works quite well. The duo sticks to standards (including two that are associated with John Coltrane) and find plenty of common ground. The mutual respect they have for each other is obvious and they both sound a bit inspired. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 29, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released November 27, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Vanguard Records

On this double LP, violinist Stéphane Grappelli gets away from his usual tribute to the late Django Reinhardt and plays 15 standards, including "Mack the Knife," "The Girl from Ipanema," "You Took Advantage of Me," and "Body and Soul." Accompanied by organist Eddy Louiss, pianist Marc Hemmeler, guitarist Jimmy Gourley, bassist Guy Pedersen, and drummer Kenny Clarke, Grappelli is in typically flawless form for these enjoyable swing sessions. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released December 23, 1976 | De Wolfe Ltd

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released June 20, 2003 | Storyville

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Telarc

4 Stars - Very Good - "...Grappelli's attack has not only remained rock sure and steady. It has remained deeply rooted and resistant to adulteration and influence....the rhythmic power is irresistible....Like all the best early swing, it exists outside the reach of fashion of a bubble of eternal validity..." © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 14, 1998 | Warner Classics

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Jazz - Released January 31, 2014 | MPS

This is a typically flawless swing set by violinist Stephane Grappelli. Joined by pianist Marc Hemmeler, bassist Eberhard Weber and drummer Kenny Clare for a session originally cut for MPS, Grappelli mixes together sophisticated ballads with hotter stomps and uplifts the somewhat modern rhythm section. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Dreyfus Jazz

At age 84, Stephane Grappelli was continuing to amaze and delight with his energy, invention, enthusiasm, and the sheer swinging joy of his playing. Having almost singlehandedly defined an entire style of jazz violin with guitarist Django Reinhardt in the 1930s, he has never departed from that admittedly archaic but never less than captivating style, and with guitarists Philip Catherine and Marc Fosset and bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, he lays claim to the gypsy-jazz mantle all over again, playing tunes both old ("Stella By Starlight," "Oh Lady Be Good," the inevitable "Minor Swing") and new (Catherine's "Galerie des Princes," Larry Coryell's "Blues for Django and Stephane") and egging both Catherine and Fosset on to flights of adrenaline-driven virtuosity that leave the audience yelling for more. Particular highlights include Grappelli's own very lovely composition titled "Ballade," and a fine medley consisting of "Someone to Watch Over Me" and "I Got Rhythm." And don't miss his wonderful solo introduction on "Oh Lady Be Good." Excellent. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 30, 1988 | 1201 MUSIC

This unusual duet session by violinist Stephane Grappelli and pianist Earl Hines had the potential for a lot of fireworks but is disappointingly relaxed. The emphasis is on ballads and, although Hines typically takes some chances with time during his solos, the music on the CD is on a whole overly tasteful and safe, well-played but not as memorable as it could have been. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 14, 1984 | Rhino Atlantic

Although he was very active in France during the 1950s and '60s, violinist Stephane Grappelli recorded relatively little until 1969. This Atlantic LP from 1962 finds Grappelli in good form in a quintet with guitarist Pierre Cavalli, performing a Django-dominated repertoire that is not all that different from what he would be playing 30 years later. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 28, 2008 | Warner Classics