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Classical - Released October 27, 2017 | B Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
This is with a touching document that begins this album devoted, for the most part, to Apollinaire’s poems put into music by Poulenc: the poet reading his own “Le Pont Mirabeau” during a reception at the Théâtre de l’Athénée in 1911. This is in this very theater that the baritone Stéphane Degout, accompanied at the piano by Cédric Tiberghien—also joined by flutist Matteo Cesari and cellist Alexis Descharmes on Ravel’s Chansons madécasses—delivers a nice handful of cycles of Poulenc’s melodies, that is to say Le Bestiaire, Calligrammes, Banalités and Quatre poèmes, the top of the composer’s art in this domain. The album concludes with Ravel and his Histoires naturelles. Degout and Tiberghien of course know of the recordings made by Poulenc himself at the piano with Pierre Bernac, but they soon realized that the notes of the composer on his own partitions—that are often of a meticulous precision—don’t really reflect what he himself took the liberty to do; hence their very free interpretation, a true reappropriation of the partition, which brings a whole new reading to the work. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 8, 2019 | B Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Short just as love, life, poetry, and a winter concert given at the Théâtre de l’Athénée, this new B Records album proposes a program of musical miniatures, from Fauré to Schumann and Brahms. An opportunity to hear the baritone Stéphane Degout, one of the best french melodists, and his partner Simon Lepper behind his piano, in a sometimes soft, sometimes stormy, always romantic album.
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Art Songs, Mélodies & Lieder - Released January 17, 2011 | Naive

Booklet
Canadian baritone Stéphane Degout is no novice to recording, with a number of very fine efforts to his credit, including Bertrand the Billy's La bohème, the Fauré Requiem with Accentus, and Ein deutsches Requiem with Yannick Nézet-Séguin, but this 2010 recital of Romantic and post-Romantic French mélodies represents his first solo venture. Degout has a big, resonant voice that's appealingly warm and solid throughout. He approaches each of the songs with intelligent musicality and obvious passion. He brings all the material a convincing dramatic flair that is especially evident and impressive in the Debussy and Ravel cycles. His is not the most colorful or nuanced voice, though, so he misses some of the subtlety that can mark the most sublime performances of these songs. He is especially strong in the passages where he can cut loose with heroic abandon, in songs like Duparc's Le Galop, but he is also effective in lyrical, meditative pieces like Debussy's Le Son du cor s'afflige vers les bois and Ravel's Le cygne. Pélleas is one of his stage roles, and it's easy to hear how the sensitivity and naturalness of his phrasing would serve him well in that opera. Degout has put together an attractive program that includes a good mix of familiar and unfamiliar repertoire. He balances well-known pieces like Ravel's Histoires naturelles, Debussy's Trois Ballades de François Villon, and songs by Duparc and Hahn with more obscure songs by Saint-Saëns, Chabrier, and some early Debussy. Pianist Hélène Lucas, a long-term collaborator of Degout's, is clearly in sync with the singer's pacing and provides a sensitive and colorful accompaniment. The miking seems very close to the singer; his sound might have benefitted from a more spacious, uncrowded ambience.