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Jazz - Released May 27, 2014 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Stan Getz's first album after his return to the United States, "Focus" is regarded by the artist himself as the most important of his career and a major milestone in the one of both musicians. This is a suite the artist commissioned from composer and arranger Eddie Sauter. In a 1997 reissue, the record label stated that Sauter had not written the melodies for Getz but had left space in his arrangements for him to improvise and also that Getz had recorded about half of the themes live with the strings and overdubbed sax solos on other sessions. "Focus" was in the midst of the movement to integrate jazz and classical music; but like all great art, it stood then as now outside the mainstream, a monumental, inimitable hybrid. And Get'z undisputed masterpiece. Note that the theme of the first track, "I'm Late, I'm Late", is nearly identical to the opening minutes of the second movement of Béla Bartók's Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta. Bartók had been an early supporter of Sauter, who intended the track as an homage. (Qobuz)Note: this so-called "reference" album is the official one released by Verve at the very end of 1961.« You see, these things can be played with the string section of any symphony orchestra in the world, and they make great tour music... The legitimacy of the past three hundred years and the soul of our modern times can be put together and be beautiful.» (Stan Getz, in praise of composer Eddie Sauter, in the original-LP liner notes) 
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Stan Getz was well-prepared for the demanding task of soloing atop expansive movie soundtrack charts. In addition to dealing with all sorts of band settings and stylistic variations just as a jazz player, Getz had managed to fully explore the bossa nova world and cut several sides with string accompaniment. His sensitive tenor work always seemed flush with the temperament of the myriad combos he worked with and was especially impressive on Focus, the landmark 1961 strings date he cut with arranger Eddie Sauter. Four years later, these two would team up for the 1965 soundtrack to Arthur Penn's film Mickey One. Penn's existential noir thriller, informed by a dose of French new wave elements, proved to be the perfect musical platform for both Getz and Sauter. Amidst Sauter's kaleidoscopic and mercurial backdrop, Getz offers up a fine mix of fluid improvisation and solo commentary. Never overpowered by the, at times, monumental full-band outbursts, Getz is able to remain poised and even break through the walls of sound with vigorous yet cogent statements of his own. This Polygram reissue couples the actual movie soundtrack with Getz and Sauter's original studio renditions of the songs. For fans fond of the Focus album, this second Getz and Sauter collaboration will not disappoint. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz and trumpeter Chet Baker never particularly liked each other and, even though they had musically compatible styles, they only worked together briefly in three periods. Their mutual hostility can be felt in subtle ways on this session. Getz ignores Baker's attempt to state the melody of "I'll Remember April" and he plays it himself several bars after. The two horns do not meet at all on the ballad medley and, since Baker sits out on "Jordu," they only play together on two of the four performances. Getz battles a squeaky reed on "I'll Remember April" and Baker seems a bit subpar in general although he really digs in on "Half-Breed Apache" (a very fast "Cherokee"). This effort, which also includes pianist Jodie Christian, bassist Victor Sproles, and drummer Marshall Thompson, doesn't really live up to its potential. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Verve

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Basically, what you see is what you get: all of the recordings Stan Getz did for the Norgran and Clef between December of 1952 and January of 1955. Most of this material has been issued several times -- at least -- by numerous labels legally and illegally. What makes the Hip-O Select set the definitive issue is, besides proper licensing, that all of these cuts, the 10" albums -- Stan Getz Plays, The Artistry of Stan Getz, all three Interpretations volumes, and Stan Getz & the Cool Sounds -- along with all the single and EP releases for a total of 45 sides -- three of them previously unreleased -- and a pair of studio cuts that appeared on the otherwise live Stan Getz at the Shrine appear in chronological order. The vast majority of these sessions were recorded with quintets. The membership of these Getz bands featured Bob Brookmeyer on all but the last where he is replaced by Tony Fruscella, pianist John Williams (though Duke Jordan appears on the earliest of these tracks with guitarist Jimmy Raney), bassist Teddy Kotick and drummer Frank Isola. Six performances were recorded by a quartet that included pianist Jimmy Rowles, drummer Max Roach, and bassist Bob Whitlock. Two of them, alternate takes of "I Hadn't Anyone 'Til You," and "Nobody But You" are previously unissued. The other unreleased cut is an alternate take of "It Don't Mean Thing," recorded with the quintet during August of 1953. The liner notes by Ashley Khan offer a typically excellent historical titime linef the sessions and the relationship between Norman Granz and Getz during during a fruitful but chaotic period in the saxophonist's life personally and professionally, without editorializing. They also include a painstaking sessionography, photographs of single labels, and album covers with the three discs presented in heavy cardboard adorned with original cover art; all of it housed handsomely in a slipcase. The remastered sound is warm and full; exponentially better than it appears anywhere else. For real Getz collectors, the set is a necessity. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 3, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released May 3, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Verve Records have released a live album, recorded on November 26th 1961 at New York’s famous jazz club, Village Gate. On stage are Stan Getz and his new quartet comprising of pianist Steve Kuhn, double bass player John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes. Although the recordings were set aside after that night and had ended up in the record company’s archives, 58 years later, they have now re-emerged with flawless sound. Getz at the Gate understandably arouses much interest as the saxophonist’s artistic direction throughout the entirety of the 2 hours 20-minute concert is one that he did not pursue thereafter.Getz formed this new group having just returned from Europe and its more modern and aggressive sound was most likely influenced by John Coltrane’s quartet in which Kuhn played. But in 1962, his album with guitarist Charlie Byrd was a hit, sparking the trend for bossa nova-infused jazz and propelling Getz not only down other stylistic paths but also to the top of the charts with numerous albums with Luiz Bonfá, João Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto. Getz at the Gate is quite clearly light years away from this exoticism but is still far from the Getz bop, cool or West Coast jazz from his early days. Here, in a highly effective post-bop style, he revisits tracks played during the 1950s such as When The Sun Comes Out, Like Someone in Love and even Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most and Roy Haynes’ drumming ties everything together brilliantly, as always. Of course, the four men also show their admiration for Coltrane by taking on his legendary Impressions. In short - a previously unreleased and utterly thrilling concert. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released October 7, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 27, 2006 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 17, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | A&M Jazz

First off, these "Lost Sessions" were never actually lost. The music here was supposed to be released as the Stan Getz Quartet's first issue on A&M, and for the usual record company reasons, it was shelved instead. The tapes were in the vault and catalogs, so it's not like they were found in someone's closet. The bottom line is that Getz, already ill at this point, still had the goods. Produced by Herb Alpert (a genius in his own right even if his records don't always hold up), the bossas here are tough, innovative jazz tunes mainly written by Getz's pianist, Kenny Barron. Don't look for the gentle side of Getz that was so beautifully displayed on his early bossa records with Charlie Byrd and Antonio Carlos Jobim. Instead, this is the man who had reinvented his playing technique. With a strong foil in Barron, Getz was free to explore his form of melodic improvisation to a fuller and wider extent, which is evident if you simply check out his solos on Barron's "Sunshower" and "El Sueno," and Mal Waldron's classic ballad "Soul Eyes." Interestingly, this was Barron's date as much as it was Getz's. His compositions and musical direction are key here, and he was trying to get deeper into and stretch the samba groove in his writing. Finding Getz in such an adventurous space in his playing allowed for this. With a rhythm section that includes bassist George Mraz and drummer Victor Lewis, this disc is essential not only for fans of Getz and Barron, but for real jazzheads. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Verve

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz is in excellent form playing with one of his finest groups, a quintet with guitarist Jimmy Raney and pianist Duke Jordan. Although the music does not quite reach the excitement level of the Getz-Raney Storyville session, this music (particularly the ballads) really shows off the tenor's appealing tone. This set is rounded out by four titles that Getz cut with a quartet in 1954 that co-starred pianist Jimmy Rowles. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1973 | Verve Reissues

The only studio meeting between Stan Getz and Bill Evans took place over two days in 1964, with the aggressive drummer Elvin Jones and either Richard Davis or Ron Carter on bass. It is peculiar that Verve shelved the results for over a decade before issuing any of the music, though it may have been felt that Getz and Evans hadn't had enough time to achieve the desired chemistry, though there are memorable moments. The punchy take of "My Heart Stood Still," the elegant interpretation of "Grandfather's Waltz," and the lush setting of the show tune "Melinda" all came from the first day's session, with Davis on bass. (Evidently he was unavailable the following day, so Carter replaced him.) Evans' driving, challenging "Funkallero" is the obvious highlight from day two, though the gorgeous "But Beautiful" and the breezy setting of "Night and Day" are also enjoyable. Only the brief version of "Carpetbagger's Theme," which seems badly out of place and suggestive of the label's interference with the session, is a bit of a disappointment. Obviously neither Getz nor Evans liked the tune, as they go through the motions in a very brief performance. [Some reissues add three unissued alternate takes, though additional material from the sessions was included in the box set The Complete Bill Evans on Verve.] © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 6, 2008 | Verve Reissues

The Bossa Nova Albums collects five of the pinnacle recordings from the best American foray into Brazilian jazz, which began in 1962 with the Stan Getz/Charlie Byrd collaboration Jazz Samba and peaked one year later with the fourth album in the ad hoc series, Getz/Gilberto (which would have been better titled Getz/Gilberto/Jobim). Getz/Gilberto's high place in musical history would be assured even without the immense success of Astrud Gilberto's vocalizing on "The Girl from Ipanema." The album was pivotal in repositioning American musical consciousness to include the soft textures and nimble playing of João Gilberto's guitar and Antonio Carlos Jobim's piano, and it influenced the material that a wide range of singers included on their albums. Admirably, Getz only continued to use his position to introduce great Brazilian musicians to the record-buying public; he recorded Jazz Samba Encore! with Luiz Bonfá, a better guitarist than even Gilberto, and Stan Getz with Guest Artist Laurindo Almeida (the latter recorded only two days after Getz/Gilberto was finished). Beyond the uniformly excellent music, this specific set does nothing more than repackage five separately available CDs, all of which featured up-to-date mastering but not the bonus tracks of previous editions; there isn't even a booklet or a single liner note beyond what was on the original LPs. For the full story and additional material, including tracks from the piecemeal Getz/Gilberto #2, Getz's The Bossa Nova Years box set is still the one to beat. © John Bush /TiVo