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Jazz - Released May 27, 2014 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz and trumpeter Chet Baker never particularly liked each other and, even though they had musically compatible styles, they only worked together briefly in three periods. Their mutual hostility can be felt in subtle ways on this session. Getz ignores Baker's attempt to state the melody of "I'll Remember April" and he plays it himself several bars after. The two horns do not meet at all on the ballad medley and, since Baker sits out on "Jordu," they only play together on two of the four performances. Getz battles a squeaky reed on "I'll Remember April" and Baker seems a bit subpar in general although he really digs in on "Half-Breed Apache" (a very fast "Cherokee"). This effort, which also includes pianist Jodie Christian, bassist Victor Sproles, and drummer Marshall Thompson, doesn't really live up to its potential. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Stan Getz was well-prepared for the demanding task of soloing atop expansive movie soundtrack charts. In addition to dealing with all sorts of band settings and stylistic variations just as a jazz player, Getz had managed to fully explore the bossa nova world and cut several sides with string accompaniment. His sensitive tenor work always seemed flush with the temperament of the myriad combos he worked with and was especially impressive on Focus, the landmark 1961 strings date he cut with arranger Eddie Sauter. Four years later, these two would team up for the 1965 soundtrack to Arthur Penn's film Mickey One. Penn's existential noir thriller, informed by a dose of French new wave elements, proved to be the perfect musical platform for both Getz and Sauter. Amidst Sauter's kaleidoscopic and mercurial backdrop, Getz offers up a fine mix of fluid improvisation and solo commentary. Never overpowered by the, at times, monumental full-band outbursts, Getz is able to remain poised and even break through the walls of sound with vigorous yet cogent statements of his own. This Polygram reissue couples the actual movie soundtrack with Getz and Sauter's original studio renditions of the songs. For fans fond of the Focus album, this second Getz and Sauter collaboration will not disappoint. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Verve

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Basically, what you see is what you get: all of the recordings Stan Getz did for the Norgran and Clef between December of 1952 and January of 1955. Most of this material has been issued several times -- at least -- by numerous labels legally and illegally. What makes the Hip-O Select set the definitive issue is, besides proper licensing, that all of these cuts, the 10" albums -- Stan Getz Plays, The Artistry of Stan Getz, all three Interpretations volumes, and Stan Getz & the Cool Sounds -- along with all the single and EP releases for a total of 45 sides -- three of them previously unreleased -- and a pair of studio cuts that appeared on the otherwise live Stan Getz at the Shrine appear in chronological order. The vast majority of these sessions were recorded with quintets. The membership of these Getz bands featured Bob Brookmeyer on all but the last where he is replaced by Tony Fruscella, pianist John Williams (though Duke Jordan appears on the earliest of these tracks with guitarist Jimmy Raney), bassist Teddy Kotick and drummer Frank Isola. Six performances were recorded by a quartet that included pianist Jimmy Rowles, drummer Max Roach, and bassist Bob Whitlock. Two of them, alternate takes of "I Hadn't Anyone 'Til You," and "Nobody But You" are previously unissued. The other unreleased cut is an alternate take of "It Don't Mean Thing," recorded with the quintet during August of 1953. The liner notes by Ashley Khan offer a typically excellent historical titime linef the sessions and the relationship between Norman Granz and Getz during during a fruitful but chaotic period in the saxophonist's life personally and professionally, without editorializing. They also include a painstaking sessionography, photographs of single labels, and album covers with the three discs presented in heavy cardboard adorned with original cover art; all of it housed handsomely in a slipcase. The remastered sound is warm and full; exponentially better than it appears anywhere else. For real Getz collectors, the set is a necessity. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 3, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released March 1, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released May 3, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Verve Records have released a live album, recorded on November 26th 1961 at New York’s famous jazz club, Village Gate. On stage are Stan Getz and his new quartet comprising of pianist Steve Kuhn, double bass player John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes. Although the recordings were set aside after that night and had ended up in the record company’s archives, 58 years later, they have now re-emerged with flawless sound. Getz at the Gate understandably arouses much interest as the saxophonist’s artistic direction throughout the entirety of the 2 hours 20-minute concert is one that he did not pursue thereafter.Getz formed this new group having just returned from Europe and its more modern and aggressive sound was most likely influenced by John Coltrane’s quartet in which Kuhn played. But in 1962, his album with guitarist Charlie Byrd was a hit, sparking the trend for bossa nova-infused jazz and propelling Getz not only down other stylistic paths but also to the top of the charts with numerous albums with Luiz Bonfá, João Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto. Getz at the Gate is quite clearly light years away from this exoticism but is still far from the Getz bop, cool or West Coast jazz from his early days. Here, in a highly effective post-bop style, he revisits tracks played during the 1950s such as When The Sun Comes Out, Like Someone in Love and even Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most and Roy Haynes’ drumming ties everything together brilliantly, as always. Of course, the four men also show their admiration for Coltrane by taking on his legendary Impressions. In short - a previously unreleased and utterly thrilling concert. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released October 7, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 27, 2006 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released April 20, 1962 | Verve Reissues

Partly because of its Brazilian collaborators and partly because of "The Girl From Ipanema," Getz/Gilberto is nearly always acknowledged as the Stan Getz bossa nova LP. But Jazz Samba is just as crucial and groundbreaking; after all, it came first, and in fact was the first full-fledged bossa nova album ever recorded by American jazz musicians. And it was just as commercially successful, topping the LP charts and producing its own pop chart hit single in "Desafinado." It was the true beginning of the bossa nova craze, and introduced several standards of the genre (including Ary Barroso's "Bahia" and Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Desafinado" and "Samba de Uma Nota Só" [aka "One Note Samba"]). But above all, Jazz Samba stands on its own artistic merit as a shimmering, graceful collection that's as subtly advanced -- in harmony and rhythm -- as it is beautiful. Getz and his co-billed partner, guitarist Charlie Byrd -- who was actually responsible for bringing bossa nova records to the U.S. and introducing Getz to the style -- have the perfect touch for bossa nova's delicate, airy texture. For his part, Byrd was one of the first American musicians to master bossa nova's difficult, bubbling syncopations, and his solos are light and lilting. Meanwhile, Getz's playing is superb, simultaneously offering a warm, full tone and a cool control of dynamics; plus, Byrd's gently off-kilter harmonies seem to stimulate Getz's melodic inventiveness even more than usual. But beyond technique, Getz intuitively understands the romanticism and the undercurrent of melancholy inherent in the music, and that's what really made Jazz Samba such a revelatory classic. Absolutely essential for any jazz collection. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Verve

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz is in excellent form playing with one of his finest groups, a quintet with guitarist Jimmy Raney and pianist Duke Jordan. Although the music does not quite reach the excitement level of the Getz-Raney Storyville session, this music (particularly the ballads) really shows off the tenor's appealing tone. This set is rounded out by four titles that Getz cut with a quartet in 1954 that co-starred pianist Jimmy Rowles. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 17, 1964 | Verve

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Jazz - Released March 1, 1973 | Verve Reissues

The only studio meeting between Stan Getz and Bill Evans took place over two days in 1964, with the aggressive drummer Elvin Jones and either Richard Davis or Ron Carter on bass. It is peculiar that Verve shelved the results for over a decade before issuing any of the music, though it may have been felt that Getz and Evans hadn't had enough time to achieve the desired chemistry, though there are memorable moments. The punchy take of "My Heart Stood Still," the elegant interpretation of "Grandfather's Waltz," and the lush setting of the show tune "Melinda" all came from the first day's session, with Davis on bass. (Evidently he was unavailable the following day, so Carter replaced him.) Evans' driving, challenging "Funkallero" is the obvious highlight from day two, though the gorgeous "But Beautiful" and the breezy setting of "Night and Day" are also enjoyable. Only the brief version of "Carpetbagger's Theme," which seems badly out of place and suggestive of the label's interference with the session, is a bit of a disappointment. Obviously neither Getz nor Evans liked the tune, as they go through the motions in a very brief performance. [Some reissues add three unissued alternate takes, though additional material from the sessions was included in the box set The Complete Bill Evans on Verve.] © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1964 | Verve

One of the biggest-selling jazz albums of all time, not to mention bossa nova's finest moment, Getz/Gilberto trumped Jazz Samba by bringing two of bossa nova's greatest innovators -- guitarist/singer João Gilberto and composer/pianist Antonio Carlos Jobim -- to New York to record with Stan Getz. The results were magic. Ever since Jazz Samba, the jazz marketplace had been flooded with bossa nova albums, and the overexposure was beginning to make the music seem like a fad. Getz/Gilberto made bossa nova a permanent part of the jazz landscape not just with its unassailable beauty, but with one of the biggest smash hit singles in jazz history -- "The Girl From Ipanema," a Jobim classic sung by João's wife, Astrud Gilberto, who had never performed outside of her own home prior to the recording session. Beyond that, most of the Jobim songs recorded here also became standards of the genre -- "Corcovado" (which featured another vocal by Astrud), "So Danço Samba," "O Grande Amor," a new version of "Desafinado." With such uniformly brilliant material, it's no wonder the album was such a success but, even apart from that, the musicians all play with an effortless grace that's arguably the fullest expression of bossa nova's dreamy romanticism ever brought to American listeners. Getz himself has never been more lyrical, and Gilberto and Jobim pull off the harmonic and rhythmic sophistication of the songs with a warm, relaxed charm. This music has nearly universal appeal; it's one of those rare jazz records about which the purist elite and the buying public are in total agreement. Beyond essential. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

A year or two shy of his bossa nova success, Stan Getz set his mind to improvising against a backdrop of darkish yet scintillating string charts. The orchestral muscle was provided by arranger Eddie Sauter; the heady and fluid horn lines, of course, came from Getz. The jazz star might have been all airy samba fog to some, but on this classic date he really showed his expansive horn talents: whether leaping and yelping on such galvanizing sides as "I'm Late, I'm Late" or ingeniously responding to the many shades heard in a grand ballad like "I Remember When," Getz is never short on ideas or panache. Admittedly Getz's most challenging date and arguably his finest moment, Focus roams the vast jazz landscape outside of bop and boogaloo to fabulous and memorable effect. [The 2003 Japanese reissue is identical to the original release. It does have dynamically remastered sound and an exact miniature replica of the original gatefold cover in thick cardboard with a rice paper sleeve.] © Stephen Cook /TiVo