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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Verve

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released June 14, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Verve Records have released a live album, recorded on November 26th 1961 at New York’s famous jazz club, Village Gate. On stage are Stan Getz and his new quartet comprising of pianist Steve Kuhn, double bass player John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes. Although the recordings were set aside after that night and had ended up in the record company’s archives, 58 years later, they have now re-emerged with flawless sound. Getz at the Gate understandably arouses much interest as the saxophonist’s artistic direction throughout the entirety of the 2 hours 20-minute concert is one that he did not pursue thereafter.Getz formed this new group having just returned from Europe and its more modern and aggressive sound was most likely influenced by John Coltrane’s quartet in which Kuhn played. But in 1962, his album with guitarist Charlie Byrd was a hit, sparking the trend for bossa nova-infused jazz and propelling Getz not only down other stylistic paths but also to the top of the charts with numerous albums with Luiz Bonfá, João Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto. Getz at the Gate is quite clearly light years away from this exoticism but is still far from the Getz bop, cool or West Coast jazz from his early days. Here, in a highly effective post-bop style, he revisits tracks played during the 1950s such as When The Sun Comes Out, Like Someone in Love and even Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most and Roy Haynes’ drumming ties everything together brilliantly, as always. Of course, the four men also show their admiration for Coltrane by taking on his legendary Impressions. In short - a previously unreleased and utterly thrilling concert. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 3, 1964 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1963 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released March 1, 1964 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | A&M Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Verve

Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz is in excellent form playing with one of his finest groups, a quintet with guitarist Jimmy Raney and pianist Duke Jordan. Although the music does not quite reach the excitement level of the Getz-Raney Storyville session, this music (particularly the ballads) really shows off the tenor's appealing tone. This set is rounded out by four titles that Getz cut with a quartet in 1954 that co-starred pianist Jimmy Rowles. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released October 7, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Fresh from the sudden success of Jazz Samba and "Desafinado," Stan Getz asked the 28-year-old, strikingly gifted Gary McFarland to arrange a bossa nova album for big band as a follow-up. Getz is always his debonair, wistful, freely-floating self, completely at home in the Brazilian idiom that he'd adopted only a few months before. McFarland usually keeps things nice and spare (although "One Note Samba" is uncharacteristically cluttered and a bit too discordant for the material), letting his pungent voicings stab the air now and then, while allowing the soloists all the room they want within the confines of producer Creed Taylor's tight timings. Four of the eight songs are by McFarland (none of which would become standards), and Getz makes relaxed impressions with "Manha de Carnival" and "Chega de Saudade." Jim Hall takes the role of acoustic guitarist from Charlie Byrd with his usual fluidity, and Hank Jones ruminates in a boppish way on piano. This album also charted quite respectably (number 13) in the first flush of the bossa nova boom. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released April 20, 1962 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released March 1, 1973 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released June 6, 1986 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

It doesn't happen too often, but there are times when the title of a jazz album and the material within interface perfectly. Hence The Steamer, where Stan Getz joined forces with a super West Coast-based rhythm section to produce some truly steaming music. "Blues for Mary Jane" is remarkable; for all of the straight-ahead heat generated by the rhythm section, Getz is incredibly relaxed, poised, and always under control while still managing to swing like mad. In other words, the style that he was able to carry over to his bossa nova adventures in the following decade is right here, ready to go. There is also room for the Getz-ballad manner on "You're Blase," and "Like Someone in Love" combines a leisurely swinging tempo with Getz's natural warmth. From the evidence of these sessions alone, not to mention countless others, the team of bassist Leroy Vinnegar and drummer Stan Levey ought to be anointed as one of the greatest rhythm sections in jazz history, and sure-fingered pianist Lou Levy benefits from their finesse and drive. All of this music is available on the three-CD set East of the Sun: The West Coast Sessions, and this Verve Master Edition release offers outtakes from that set at the end of the disc. Indeed, the alternate "How About You?" has some swinging hairpin turns by Getz that will make your head swivel. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

Jazz - Released April 20, 2010 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Verve

In 1955 the difference between East/West Coast jazz was a hot topic, with critics and fans capable of taking zealous musical alliances with one or the other. The title of this disc, West Coast Jazz, was conceived as a joke, considering all musicians involved were originally from the East Coast and did not play exclusively in the laid-back, commercially profitable, cool style, as pigeonholed by some. Stan Getz was in California for his part in the film the Benny Goodman Story, where he picked up a week long gig at Zardi's in Hollywood. The pickup band that greeted him featured a great rhythm section: Lou Levy (piano), Leroy Vinnegar (bass), and Shelly Manne (drums), along with Conte Candoli (trumpet). These musicians connected with Getz immediately, having crossed paths previously. Impressed with this lineup, he took them into the studio to record West Coast Jazz. Generally unlike West Coast jazz of the time, the rapid group interplay with energized bop solos, still stand out particularly on "S-H-I-N-E" and Dizzy Gillespie's "A Night in Tunisia." Coupled with the album's original six tracks, the Verve Master Edition collects several previously released outtakes from these sessions. ~ Al Campbell