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Rock - Released January 1, 2004 | Polydor Records

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

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It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 2, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released May 1, 2006 | Polydor Records

The anthemic indie rock sound of Snow Patrol provides a bit of hope and promise among the many acts attempting to fit into a certain genre or scene. Snow Patrol belongs to their own scene, and their third album, 2004's Final Straw, proved that with several global hit singles such as "Run," "Chocolate," "How to Be Dead," and the reissue of "Spitting Games." British fans once more proclaimed their beloved Snow Patrol as a true rock & roll band while American audiences finally took notice of the Scottish collective. The band's fourth album, Eyes Open, doesn't fall short from where they left off; in fact, Snow Patrol's hungry rock sound only gets bigger and better this time around. All guitar hooks and singalong choruses are firmly in place, and Gary Lightbody is an underrated frontman. On Eyes Open, he once again writes songs that are from the heart and true to self-reflection without getting too sappy and too overjoyed. From the playful name-dropping of Sufjan Stevens on "Hands Open" to their passionate delivery on "It's Beginning to Get to Me" and "Shut Your Eyes," Snow Patrol's approach is epic. They are the kind of band that embraces simplicity as beautiful and human flaws as art. The lullaby-like "You Could Be Happy" and the passionate buildup of "Make This Go on Forever" are evident of that. This 11-song set is a masterpiece, so keep your ears and eyes open for Snow Patrol. They're onto something big. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, the fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 9, 2019 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Polydor Records

Booklet
It’s a great comeback for Snow Patrol. The Brits have simply let some time pass since The Greatest Hits (four years to be exact), which already sounded like a career review. Seven years since Fallen Empires. Time, for the friends of Irish singer Gary Lightbody to bring him back to writing and help him out of his deep depression, and then onto the editing of Wildness in Los Angeles. The man who writes as much for Taylor Swift as Harry Styles, and whose songs end up being the main themes of the most watched TV shows in the world, with Grey’s Anatomy, in this seventh opus he has put the essential ingredients required for every mainstream pop album: a quavering voice, melodramatic guitar, expiatory existentialist lyrics (Life And Death, Life On Earth, Don't Give In). Even if you won’t find in any tracks with a lot of potential, fans of the hugely successful Chasing Cars will be overjoyed. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2006 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

Booklet
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Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Polydor Records

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Rock - Released December 7, 2018 | A&M (UC)

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

As an alternative to the 2009 double-disc compilation Up to Now, Snow Patrol's Greatest Hits shortens the track listing down to 14 songs, and updates the time line by including the hit single from 2011's Fallen Empires, "Called Out in the Dark." This collection skimps on all of the material from the early records Songs for Polar Bears and When It's All Over We Still Have to Clear Up, but it's a forgivable move since Final Straw, Eyes Open, and A Hundred Million Suns have more than enough hits to fill a disc. Along with "Just Say Yes," which originally debuted on the last compilation, highlights include "Chocolate," "Run," "Crack the Shutters," and "Chasing Cars." ~ Jason Lymangrover
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 3, 2018 | Blue Pie Records

On its second album, Snow Patrol takes a significant leap forward in terms of artistry and vision. It was perhaps too easy to write the trio off as a sub-Belle & Sebastian combo after its debut, what with the aural similarities to that band and the fact that they were both on Jeepster. And the music here still has characteristically lush and gentle moments -- and still intermittently echoes their better-known labelmates ("Batten Down the Hatch," "On/Off") -- sometimes barely rising above a whisper, while the subject matter is dour and brittle as ever. Snow Patrol again dwells on bad dreams and heartbreak, regrets and one-night stands, tempering even the few rays of sunlight with wounded or downbeat thoughts. And on songs like the nightmarishly paced dirge "If I'd Found the Right Words to Say," the mood befits the content. But When It's All Over We Still Have to Clear Up breaks dramatically and sensationally with the cult of twee. It is not a subdued or stilted album, either musically or emotionally, which not only makes the band's melancholia palatable but also renders it substantial and genuine rather than affected. The music is still extremely tuneful, but songs such as "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again," "Last Ever Lone Gunman," and "One Night Is Not Enough" are truly guitar-driven things (occasionally with subtle electronics) that underscore a determinedness and passionate vitality often lacking in similar inclined approaches (including, sometimes, Belle). When "Black and Blue" abruptly transitions from barely there falsetto crooning to a grinding, overdriven guitar assault, it sounds like a call to arms. Rather than small and insular, the album is open, grand, and beautiful. ~ Stanton Swihart
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2001 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2011 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

The sixth studio album from the moody Glasgow-via-Belfast outfit finds the group adding a dash of electronica into its already wintry mix of confessional late-November alt-rock and one-fist-pumping, mini-arena pop. Opening with the one-two punch of “I’ll Never Let Go” and “Called Out in the Dark,” Fallen Empires establishes an expansive vista of sound early on, bathing fairly simple melodies in waves of fastidious loops and sparse percussion. The band’s penchant for crafting emotionally charged, if not entirely memorable, midtempo Brit-pop anthems still dominates, but standout cuts like the gorgeous ballads “The Garden Rules” and “Those Distant Bells,” as well as the surprisingly immediate title cut, prove that Snow Patrol still have the potential to hit the sweet spot between U2's stadium baiting, Coldplay's icy elegance, and Elbow's art school-infused, north country soul. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 22, 2018 | Polydor Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 24, 2006 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd

Booklet
On its second album, Snow Patrol takes a significant leap forward in terms of artistry and vision. It was perhaps too easy to write the trio off as a sub-Belle & Sebastian combo after its debut, what with the aural similarities to that band and the fact that they were both on Jeepster. And the music here still has characteristically lush and gentle moments -- and still intermittently echoes their better-known labelmates ("Batten Down the Hatch," "On/Off") -- sometimes barely rising above a whisper, while the subject matter is dour and brittle as ever. Snow Patrol again dwells on bad dreams and heartbreak, regrets and one-night stands, tempering even the few rays of sunlight with wounded or downbeat thoughts. And on songs like the nightmarishly paced dirge "If I'd Found the Right Words to Say," the mood befits the content. But When It's All Over We Still Have to Clear Up breaks dramatically and sensationally with the cult of twee. It is not a subdued or stilted album, either musically or emotionally, which not only makes the band's melancholia palatable but also renders it substantial and genuine rather than affected. The music is still extremely tuneful, but songs such as "Never Gonna Fall in Love Again," "Last Ever Lone Gunman," and "One Night Is Not Enough" are truly guitar-driven things (occasionally with subtle electronics) that underscore a determinedness and passionate vitality often lacking in similar inclined approaches (including, sometimes, Belle). When "Black and Blue" abruptly transitions from barely there falsetto crooning to a grinding, overdriven guitar assault, it sounds like a call to arms. Rather than small and insular, the album is open, grand, and beautiful. ~ Stanton Swihart
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 31, 2010 | Jeepster Recordings Ltd