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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 16, 2019 | Doggystyle Records - EMPIRE

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 8, 2015 | Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2005 | Priority Records

The tracks on this compilation cover 1998 through 2002, a period filled with plenty of artistic, commercial, and personal ups and downs for Snoop Dogg. It's simply a selection of highlights from Da Game Is to Be Sold Not to Be Told, No Limit Top Dogg, Tha Last Meal, and Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$. Priority thankfully resisted the temptation to throw in a couple exclusives, so it cuts right to the chase, offering a pretty even spread between the four albums, rendering them all but obsolete for casual fans. The only missing chart entries from this phase: two tracks from tha Eastsidaz's self-titled album, along with a track each from the Dr. Dolittle 2 and Baby Boy soundtracks. Though Snoop was responsible for plenty of filler on each of the albums, few MCs have pulled off such a range of work with such a high level of finesse, from the Premier-produced "The One and Only" (raw, in your face) to the Neptunes-produced "Beautiful" (smooth, laid-back). A lot of people -- fans and haters alike -- declared Snoop's career dead once the disastrous first No Limit album came out, so the MC himself must feel at least a little vindicated that this set exists. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 19, 2013 | Berhane Sound System - VICE - Mad Decent - RCA Records

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Gospel - Released March 16, 2018 | All The Time Entertainment

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The planets have aligned, Snoop Dogg is back. Following the 2013 reggae episode titled Reincarnated, released under the alias Snoop Lion, the Californian rapper grants another wish: a gospel album. A double album in fact! Throughout the 32 tracks, Snoop Dogg strings together countless featurings. Faith Evans, the Clark Sisters, Mary Mary, B Slade, John P. Kee, Fred Hammond, to name only a few. Between hints of 90s RnB (Sunshine Fell Good, Sunrise), smooth and passionate touches (Bible Of Love), soul with kitsch brass (One More Day or On Time with B Slade) and seventies synthesisers (Come as You Are), gospel and a hint of hip-hop (Changed with Jazze Pha or Chizzle featuring Daz Dillinger), Snoop simmers his recipe in the best of pots. And as it’s made with love, it can only smell delicious! Cherry on top, you can enjoy the King’s legendary nonchalance in Change The World featuring pastor John P. Kee. A highly anticipated release. Brilliant! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2006 | Geffen

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | Priority Records

Booklet
Snoop Dogg leaves much of his gang-banging past behind him in favor of preened pimp posturing on his final album for No Limit Records, The Last Meal. Snoop's increasingly old-school pose suits his gracefully aging self well. Despite his former affiliation with Death Row Records and his much-publicized murder trial, Snoop never seemed like much of a thug, which is partly why hostile albums like Tha Doggfather (1996) and Da Game Is to Be Sold Not to Be Told (1998) seemed a bit forced. Contrarily, it seems more natural for him to rap about the pampered pimp life, as he does here on The Last Meal -- tall glasses of Hennesey, glistening pairs of Stacey Adams, overcast clouds of chronic smoke, hungry hordes of so-called bitches -- over truck-rattling G-funk basslines that lope along at a languid tempo. These impressive beats come courtesy of a similarly impressive roster of producers: second-wave G-funksters Meech Wells, Battlecat, Jelly Roll, and Soopafly, and brand-name hitmakers Dr. Dre, Scott Storch, and Timbaland. Among this roster, Timbaland certainly stands out, as do his contributions, "Snoop Dogg (What's My Name, Pt. 2)" and "Set It Off," which place Snoop in an uncharacteristically energetic context. He handles himself well on these bouncy songs regardless, yet seems more at home on Dre's smoother contributions, "Hennesey n Buddah" and "Lay Low." Beyond these four tracks, the remaining 15 are a mixed bag, most of them Crip-walking along at a stoned tempo, featuring soulful P-Funk hooks by Kokane and offering laid-back respite while this lengthy album moves leisurely toward its throwback album-capper, "Y'all Gone Miss Me." Following this misty-eyed finale, you're left with the thankful sense that Snoop has finally taken control of his career after succumbing to the oppressive fancy of Suge Knight and Master P ever since parting ways with Dr. Dre following Doggystyle (1993). ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 13, 2001 | Death Row Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2002 | Parlophone

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 24, 2001 | Death Row Records

A lot happened to Snoop Doggy Dogg between his debut, Doggystyle, and his second album, Tha Doggfather. During those three years, he became the most notorious figure in hip-hop through a much-publicized murder trial, where he was found not guilty, and he also became a father. Musically, the most important thing to happen to Snoop was the parting of ways between his mentor Dr. Dre and his record label, Death Row. Dre's departure from Death Row meant that Snoop had to handle the production duties on Tha Doggfather himself, and the differences between the two records are immediately apparent. Though it works the same G-funk territory, the bass is less elastic and there is considerably less sonic detail. In essence, all of the music on Tha Doggfather reworks the funk and soul of the late '70s and early '80s, without updating it too much -- there's not that much difference between "Snoop's Upside Ya Head" and "Oops Up Side Your Head," for instance. Though the music isn't original, and the lyrics break no new territory, the execution is strong -- Snoop's rapping and rhyming continue to improve, while the bass-heavy funk is often intoxicating. At over 70 minutes, Tha Doggfather runs too long to not have several filler tracks, but if you ignore those cuts, the album is a fine follow-up to one of the most successful hip-hop albums in history. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1999 | Priority Records

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Miscellaneous - Released May 19, 2017 | Doggystyle Records - EMPIRE

Heavily nostalgic and yet fully energized, Neva Left continues Snoop Dogg's easy whim-to-whim glide. The photo used for the cover dates back to the early '90s, taken near a sign for the California state route that shares its number with the state's penal code for homicide. A frame from tha Dogg Pound's "New York, New York" video would be just as reflective of the contents. Although their album offers a high quantity of whomping basslines played at relaxed tempos, Snoop demonstrates throughout that he still has love for the East Coast. He raps like Slick Rick as he boasts about "singing like a Tempree," gamely references Whodini, Boogie Down Productions, a Tribe Called Quest, and Wu-Tang Clan elsewhere, while the guest list includes KRS-One, Redman, and Method Man. Snoop even revisits his beeper-era nod to Biz Markie on a "Vapors" remix, one of several cuts handled by long-term associate DJ Battlecat. The cleverest beat combines coastal sources: "Promise You This," from League of Starz' Dupri, dots Too $hort-style minimal machine funk with a little "It Takes Two" as Snoop attests to being a no-talk, all-action self-starter, supporting the community through his youth football league and by putting people to work. The sinister and spacy Kaytranada/BadBadNotGood production "Lavender [Nightfall Remix]" is the best of the cross-generational tracks, which also include the neo-Neptunes "Go On" (with October London on the hook, evoking Marvin Gaye) and the trap-style "Trash Bags," the latter the only beat on which Snoop, otherwise appealing as ever, sounds out of place. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 19, 2013 | Berhane Sound System - VICE - Mad Decent - RCA Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 21, 2011 | Rostrum - Atlantic

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 14, 2019 | Doggystyle Records - EMPIRE

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 3, 2019 | Doggystyle Records - EMPIRE

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 3, 2015 | Global Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

On his tenth album (and first as the chairman of Priority Records), Snoop Dogg continues to prove he’s not a relic of the G-funk era, proving that while the music may change, good flow never goes out of style. Right out of the gate, Snoop drops a song for the West Coast Jerkin’ set with “I Wanna Rock” before switching gears back to classic Snoop with the Dre-inspired “2 Minute Warning,” where the rapper lets everyone know he’s still the same Snoop Dogg after all these years as he proclaims, “Ponytail still swingin’, hair still braided/Laker to a Clipper I won’t be faded.” With production by Lil Jon, Timbaland, Danjahandz, Battlecat, and the Neptunes (just to name a handful), it’s no wonder the album sounds like not only a retrospective of every stage of his career, but of the trends in rap music as a whole. With the album touching on his G-funk beginnings with “Secrets,” crunk on the Lil Jon-produced “1800,” the Dirty South on the Soulja Boy collaboration “Pronto,” and his time on the Neptunes-fronted Star Trak on “Special” (featuring guest spots by Pharrell and Brandy), Snoop Dogg is able to prove simultaneously that he’s still relevant while showing off his veteran status. With all the big production on the album, it comes as a bit of a surprise that Snoop shines the brightest on the sparse “Upside Down” (produced by longtime Snoop collaborator Terrance Martin). Sounding like a throwback to “Drop It Like It’s Hot,” the simple arrangement allows Snoop’s easy flow to sit front and center, showing off the effortless style that's kept him in the rap game for nearly half of his life. Malice N Wonderland might not go into the books as a perennial classic like Doggystyle, but like R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The Masterpiece and Paid Tha Cost To Be Da Bo$$$ before it, the album serves as a reminder of the flexibility and resilience that have allowed Snoop Dogg to remain an enduring figure in hip-hop. ~ Gregory Heaney

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | Priority Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2004 | Geffen

Internet leakers caused the release of R&G (Rhythm & Gangsta): The Masterpiece to be pushed up a week, but that just means the world got to bask in the excitement of Snoop's great return for seven extra days. Upon its release, the ultrahot production team the Neptunes' contribution to the killer lead single "Drop It Like It's Hot" had been duly noted, but lost in all the chatter was how inspired and on-fire Snoop sounds. Any fan keeping up with his street-level mixtape series Welcome to the Chuuch could tell you something new and fresh was brewing, and 2002's Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$ was excellent, but Snoop's let his fans down before and two years off could mean trouble. Not to be, since Rhythm & Gangsta is right up there with his best while being riskier than anything before it. New sounds like tongue clicks, smooth jazz guitars, and a bit of Steve Miller's "Fly Like an Eagle" give Snoop a brand-new sonic palette to work with, and he's more than ready for it. The up-tempo "Signs" with Justin Timberlake is glittery disco fun, but it ain't gonna keep Snoop from being himself. He's hardcore throughout the album, an album that's got plenty of street and commercial appeal and all the difficulties that comes with it. The numerous youngsters who can't stop singing "Drop It Like It's Hot" are going to freak their parents out with this one. "Can You Control Yo Hoe" is a tough stunner with an inescapable, loopy hook, but Snoop's challenge to the homies is rather disturbing. "If she won't do what you say, why aren't you slapping her?" is the song's direct message that can't be easily brushed off as metaphor, and it's the one that's gonna send mom and dad back to the record store, fuming! Recommending such an album that gets viciously misogynistic -- elsewhere too -- is difficult, but Snoop is fierce throughout Rhythm & Gangsta and putting "Masterpiece" in the title isn't hyperbole. ~ David Jeffries