Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$7.29

Classical - Released August 7, 2015 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
CD$7.29

Classical - Released October 1, 2010 | Naxos

Distinctions Exceptional Sound Recording
CD$7.29

Classical - Released March 29, 2000 | Naxos

CD$11.99

Ballets - Released December 13, 1995 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$7.29

Classical - Released November 11, 2016 | Naxos Special Projects

CD$7.29

Classical - Released May 1, 2012 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$39.99

Classical - Released May 1, 2012 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$7.29

Classical - Released October 26, 2003 | Naxos

CD$7.29

Classical - Released December 7, 2018 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$7.29

Classical - Released August 27, 1997 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$7.29

Classical - Released March 27, 1991 | Naxos

CD$7.99

Classical - Released February 23, 1994 | Marco-Polo

CD$7.99

Classical - Released July 11, 1994 | Marco-Polo

Booklet
CD$7.99

Classical - Released June 15, 2000 | Marco-Polo

Booklet
Just a decade after doing a partial recording of the music for Ghost of Frankenstein, the Marco Polo label has come back with this new recording of virtually the entire score from that film, augmented by the music from Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror and portions of the scores from Son of Dracula (1943), Black Friday (1940), and Man Made Monster (1941). All of this material was written (or co-authored) by either Frank Skinner or Hans J. Salter, who frequently worked together on these Universal horror and mystery titles, to the point where it is often difficult for the outside observer to say who did what, or which. The music is in many ways more impressive and subtle than the film itself, especially in the case of Ghost of Frankenstein; some of this scoring -- such as the pulsing strings under ominous reed and wind melodies, the horn calls evoking the presence of the monster, and also, more distantly, the melody associated with the broken-necked Ygor (Bela Lugosi) from the prior Son of Frankenstein -- will be familiar. Sharply juxtaposed with that material are the lyrical themes associated with "Frankenstein's Castle" and "Erik's Dilemma" -- crossing between them is "Elsa's Discovery," with its gentle motif for the scientist's daughter giving way to swirling string and flute parts, all built around the ominous theme associated with Ygor and the monster (as well as elements of Salter's earlier score for the movie The Wolf Man), the monster's on-screen arrival manifesting itself finally in a dark contrabassoon cadenza. The music may actually be more sophisticated than the final edit of the movie, and much of its construction as well; for many aficionados of classic horror, Ghost of Frankenstein was the film where the Universal horror series "jumped the shark," as they say in popular culture circles. Dr. Frankenstein's son unknowingly -- in a vain attempt to undo his father's mistake -- replaced the monster's original brain with that of Ygor, and created a monster 1,000 times worse. The movie has a threadbare look compared with past entries and few of the stylistic flourishes that made the three prior Frankenstein films such an unsettling delight to watch; the music, however, has surprising depth and class, as well as a fair degree of complexity. The other scores represented all have widely varying characters, despite being associated with horror and suspense films of the same era and having been written by the same composers -- Son of Dracula's main title is actually rather wistfully romantic. And the producers have excerpted the most playful section of Man Made Monster's score, one of the most guilelessly charming pieces ever written by Hans J. Salter. "Electro-Biology" from the same score is a dazzling workout for the percussion, horns, and upper strings. The music for Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror contains musical elements (especially in the track "Voice of Terror") that would be explored further by Frank Skinner (and other members of the Universal music department staff) in the scoring for such 1950s films as It Came From Outer Space and Tarantula. Here, it's just beautifully moody, occasionally exciting, and generally underscores points in the film with more subtlety than much of the script did. The playing by the Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra of Bratislava is inspired and flawless, with conductor William T. Stromberg finding the perfect balance between exposing musical detail and maintaining the tempo and tension demanded of film music; this conductor and orchestra avoid the pitfalls of other re-recordings (primarily from England) where the players act as though the music will break if they don't treat it gently. © TiVo
CD$7.99

Classical - Released June 3, 2000 | Marco-Polo

Booklet
Roy Webb (1888-1982) was never remotely as well established as a composer as his mentor Max Steiner, but he composed his share of good music in the course of scoring 300 movies in a career lasting more than 30 years. This collection is devoted entirely to Webb's music for the movies of Val Lewton, the producer responsible for Cat People, I Walked With a Zombie, The Seventh Victim, The Body Snatcher, and Bedlam, among other notable low-budget suspense and horror movies of the early 1940s. Each of those scores is represented here, and it's a most interesting mix; no two sound alike, and each is more complex musically than meets the ear. Bedlam's music is the most traditional Hollywood music, deliberately evoking the 18th century setting of the film. Cat People and The Seventh Victim represent distinctly non-traditional suspense scores, built around memorable core motifs, dealing with their central characters' struggle with the forces of evil within and without; as it happens, Webb was at a disadvantage on The Seventh Victim in that the film's most effective musical moment was the party scene in which Johannes Brahms' "Waltz in A minor" was used to stunning effect over a telling piece of dialogue. His music for The Body Snatcher and I Walked With a Zombie are similar in that both utilize traditional folk sources as their bases: Scottish music in the case of The Body Snatcher and Haitian music in I Walked With a Zombie. The best parts of each score are represented, and they make more engaging listening than the other material, being less psychologically oriented and more extroverted, though "I Walked with a Zombie" would likely have worked better if it had included the sung material from the original film. The performance by the Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra under William T. Stromberg is more than competent, and the tempi and timbres of the recording capture the essentials of the original film material, which is complex enough but not always that interesting as music. It's revealing that the annotation gives about as much space to plot summaries and biographical information on Lewton as it does to the music itself. Clearly the concept behind the CD is a marketable one, even if the music itself lacks some of the substance that one is accustomed to hearing in the work of Steiner, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, and others. © TiVo
CD$7.99

Classical - Released August 8, 1994 | Marco-Polo

Booklet
The score to Franco Zeffirelli's Jane Eyre matches the subdued, somber tone of the film, which uses deceptively simple, minimalistic orchestral pieces to convey the yearning, brooding of this more realistic interpretation of Charlotte Bronte's classic gothic romance. © TiVo
CD$7.29

Symphonic Music - Released October 28, 2008 | Naxos

Booklet
CD$7.29

Classical - Released September 30, 1996 | Naxos

Booklet