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Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2015 | Harbinger Sound (Sleaford Mods)

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Punk / New Wave - Released February 22, 2019 | Extreme Eating Records

Piano, piano. Sleaford Mods are the kind of band that move slowly but surely. And uncompromisingly as well. Now that they’ve finally broken through after so many albums, Nottingham's two proletarian fortysomethings have their heads firmly screwed onto their shoulders. With alcohol and drugs now taken off his shopping list, Jason Williamson has stripped back his ego as much as his prose. Following the success of English Tapas, the duo has released Eton Alive, a pun that addresses the elitism consuming England. Their language is always radical, and their new melody-diatribe formula is mixing together well. With Jason's penchant for angry rants, the lyrics revolve around the gloom shrouding the nation: Brexit, class conflicts and thought conditioning. The influence of grime is tangible in the thick beats (Big Burt, Discourse) and we even find touches of soul (Negative Script). As one of the most interesting groups in the UK, Sleaford Mods prove (as if that’s even necessary) that they are part of the ever-expanding new British punk scene. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 24, 2014 | Harbinger Sound (Sleaford Mods)

It took Sleaford Mods nearly eight years to make their breakthrough album, but what a breakthrough: Divide and Exit doesn't just build on the momentum Jason Williamson and Andrew Fearn began with 2013's Austerity Dogs, it kicks down the door and announces Sleaford Mods as one of the most truly punk outfits of the 2010s. Fearn and Williamson take aim at the stupidity in music, politics, and culture like they're lancing a festering boil, and while the results aren't pretty, they're pretty cathartic. What would be rough edges or even mistakes in other bands' work make up the heart of their music; they're so insistent on getting their message across that there's no time for second takes. As on Austerity Dogs, Divide and Exit's sound is stark and blunt: Fearn's clattering beats borrow from industrial and hip-hop, while the gurgling basslines on "Air Conditioning" and "Strike Force" sound like they're part garbage disposal. These grimy backdrops are set ablaze by Williamson's rapid-fire wit, which shows no signs of fading after nearly a decade. If anything, he's become an even more masterful conduit of anger, channeling it through highly quotable lyrics full of crude outbursts and scathing eloquence, often at the same time. Toilet imagery abounds on Divide and Exit: Williamson expresses his disgust for a clueless liberal frenemy (and himself) by wanking in the loo on "You're Brave" and begins "Tied Up in Nottz" with pungent opening line "The smell of piss is so strong it smells like decent bacon." After venting their spleens on the album's first half, Sleaford Mods take a brainier, arguably more potent approach on the rest of Divide and Exit. With its ghostly backing vocals, "Tweet Tweet Tweet" conjures images of Fearn and Williamson surrounded, Shaun of the Dead-style, by complacent, social media-fixated zombies, while "Smithy"'s helicopter samples put a finer point on the album's claustrophobic paranoia. "Liveable Shit" borders on performance art in the way Williamson, his doubled vocals falling somewhere between hype man and nagging conscience, connects the dots between Jim Morrison, Gary Oldman's Dracula, and everyday injustices while shouting down canned laughter. While parts of Divide and Exit are extremely English, for every reference that flies over the heads of listeners outside of Blighty, many more connect. "Tiswas" takes its name from a British children's television show from the '70s and '80s, but Williamson and Fearn's frustration is palpable -- and universal. Though they delivered more nuance on their other 2014 releases (particularly the Tiswas EP), Divide and Exit is the brilliant gut-punch that began a momentous year for Sleaford Mods. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2018 | Rough Trade

Sleaford Mods' EPs have always been as vital to their body of work as their albums, and this self-titled set of five songs is no exception. Though it seemed like Jason Williamson and Andrew Fearn couldn't get any bleaker than they did on English Tapas, Sleaford Mods' brisk tempos and jaunty keyboards mask a viewpoint that's possibly even more despairing than before. Similarly, the characters in these blunt but deceptively layered tracks transform their free-floating rage at class warfare, corruption, and oppression into petty acts of violence aimed at the nearest target. On the excellent "Stick in a Five and Go," Williamson plots to beat up an online troll by posing as a mailman; when he growls "you need to sign for it, mate" over Fearn's goading bassline, the need to hold someone -- anyone -- accountable is almost tangible. As immediate as Sleaford Mods' frustrations might seem, the duo exposes its history with brilliantly chosen imagery. "Gallows Hill" is another standout: a glowering grind that juxtaposes a Victorian-era graveyard's previous incarnation as a public execution space with its present as a spot for drug deals and sex trafficking, it feels and sounds like a haunted, tainted loop of suffering. "Bang Someone Out" echoes this sentiment evocatively when Williamson pauses the song's catharsis to note, "the plague rolls down from the hills up there...this is how it's gone on in the United Kingdom." Perhaps even more so than on their albums, Sleaford Mods distill the songs on their EPs into potent vignettes. Loosely inspired by Williamson's stint as a glass collector in a pub, saving leftover drinks for himself, "Dregs" sketches a life eked out on scraps with the simple line "the dregs are mine tonight." As vivid, eloquent, and artfully ugly as any of their full-lengths, Sleaford Mods proves once again that there's no such thing as a stopgap release in Fearn and Williamson's world. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 3, 2013 | Harbinger Sound (Sleaford Mods)

Armed with little more than a primitive drum machine, some flabby bass guitar, and a seemingly bottomless well of gripes and grievances, Nottingham duo Sleaford Mods set most of Britain in their crosshairs on their devastating debut LP, Austerity Dogs. The disillusioned youth who have traditionally hoarded punk's essence don't stand a chance against 40-something Jason Williamson, whose irritated, ornery rants are delivered like a machine gun of disparagement over bandmate Andrew Fearn's hammering lo-fi beats. A handful of singles and a 2012 self-released CD-R called Wank preceded this release, but Austerity Dogs, with its dead-on working-class takedowns and hard-won fury, feels like it came out of nowhere. Their blindingly simple formula of gritty stream-of-consciousness rapping/shouting over thin, Spartan beats and often two- or three-note basslines seems like it should have been done before, but one listen to the full-bore vitriol of "Fizzy" or "The Wage Don't Fit" and it's clear that the Mods own this turf. There's a brutal poeticism to the delivery as Williamson, in his thick Midlands accent, takes down horrible employers ("The cunt with the gut and the Buzz Lightyear haircut, calling the workers plebs"), other bands ("I hate that lad shit, that red top nice tits Ian McCulloch white boy bore me fuckless terrace bit"), and crappy clubs ("Pot-bellied promoters, cheap coasters, I can't get the fucking stain off"), or just spouts hilarious obscurities ("I'm gonna wee in a basin, unleash a horrible looking vampire like James Mason"). Words like raw and honest come to mind, but really it's the urgency of Austerity Dogs that makes it so thrilling. It's bound to polarize listeners, but ultimately it gives the impression of being fully armed throughout, and keeping up that kind of intensity is a tough trick to pull off. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
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Punk / New Wave - Released May 10, 2019 | Extreme Eating Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2016 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 2017 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 27, 2020 | Rough Trade

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Punk / New Wave - Released January 7, 2019 | Extreme Eating Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 24, 2014 | INVADA Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 5, 2020 | Rough Trade

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Punk / New Wave - Released February 15, 2019 | Extreme Eating Records