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Rock - Released January 24, 1989 | Rhino Atlantic

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The material on Skid Row is mostly typical pop-metal fluff, but since Skid Row was one of the hardest bands to find commercial success during the hair metal fad, the songs sound angrier and more aggressive than the lyrics and hooks might indicate. Part of this is due simply to the musical talent in the band, and part of it is due to vocalist Sebastian Bach; his tendency to oversing actually gives some much-needed nasty attitude to most of the songs, and when the music does match those sentiments (i.e., "Youth Gone Wild"), the results fulfill, rather than merely hint at, Skid Row's potential. But the melodies and songwriting are pretty consistent throughout the album, even if they aren't as close to true heavy metal as they sound. The hit power ballads "18 and Life" and "I Remember You" are musically generic, but Bach's over the top delivery makes them guilty pleasures as well. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released January 18, 2019 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released October 15, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

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Metal - Released January 24, 1989 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop/Rock - Released November 29, 2007 | Sony BMG Music Entertainment

While in the pantheon of guitar superheroes in his native U.K., Gary Moore--like his idol Peter Green of early Fleetwood Mac fame--has found stateside fame elusive in his four decades of shredding. This new reissue could go a long way toward reestablishing some cult cred for Moore in the U.S. SKID ROW/34 HOURS collects the first two records from his original band, Skid Row (not to be confused with the hair metal band of the same name), for the first time on one disc. Both records are digitally remastered and reveal a smoking power-blues trio with jazzy flourishes and serious chops. Originally released in 1970, SKID ROW finds Moore, bassist Brush Shiels, and drummer Noel Bridgeman recovering from the departure of original singer Phil Lynott--of Thin Lizzy fame--and establishing their progressive blues rock recipe. 34 HOURS masters their sound and features jammier, more expansive odysseys such as "Night of the Warm Witch." Skid Row was short-lived--as Moore went on to join Thin Lizzy as second lead guitarist--but these records remain a high-water mark for early '70s British blues.
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Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

Skid Row get harder and heavier on their sophomore effort, matching Sebastian Bach's gritty, streetwise rants to lean, driving riffs that manage to back up all the attitudinal posturing. Largely missing are the bits of pop-metal fluff that filled out Skid Row; in their place are tales from the dark side about drugs, corruption, and the like, with Bach affecting a tough, threatening persona most of the time. The furious noise kicked up behind Bach is usually more threatening than his overwrought vocal delivery, but Slave to the Grind is powerful enough that it doesn't really matter. "Monkey Business," "Get the Fuck Out," and the thrashy title track crush most anything on the debut, and power ballads like "Quicksand Jesus" and "Wasted Time" are far less generic than their Skid Row counterparts. Many observers were surprised when Slave to the Grind became the first heavy metal album to debut at number one on the Billboard charts, but it really was one of the best -- and heaviest -- examples of mainstream hard rock/heavy metal in the genre's MTV heyday. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

B-Sides Ourselves was intended to be a stopgap EP, but it turned out to be Skid Row's last recording for three years. It wasn't a bad way to step away from the spotlight, actually. A collection of five covers, B-Sides Ourselves ranks among the best music Skid Row ever recorded, simply because it's so raw and seething with energy. Produced by the band, the EP careens through the songs -- including selections by Kiss and the Sex Pistols -- at a breakneck pace, creating vicious rock & roll that is more vital than their two previous albums. The band managed to harness that power and put it into their original material on their next album, 1995's Subhuman Race. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Hard Rock - Released March 7, 1995 | Atlantic Records

Skid Row waited out the grunge storm and returned in 1995 with Subhuman Race, their strongest and most vicious record to date. Abandoning most of the pop-metal posturing of their early hit albums, Skid Row strip back their music to the basics -- roaring guitars and Sebastian Bach's shriek. It wasn't a hit the size of Slave to the Grind, yet it made an impressive showing, climbing into the Top 40. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine