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Disco - Released February 15, 1979 | Rhino Atlantic

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Before 1979's We Are Family, Sister Sledge wasn't a huge name in the R&B/disco world. The group had enjoyed a small following and scored a few minor hits, including "Love, Don't You Go Through No Changes on Me" in 1974 and "Blockbuster Boy" in 1977. But it wasn't until We Are Family that the Philadelphia siblings finally exploded commercially, and the people they have to thank for their commercial success are Chic leaders Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards. The Rodgers/Edwards team handles all of the writing, producing, and arranging on this album; so not surprisingly, almost everything on We Are Family is very Chic-sounding. That is true of the sexy "He's the Greatest Dancer" and the anthemic, uplifting title song (both of which soared to #1 on the R&B charts), as well as excellent album tracks like the lush "Easier to Love," the perky "One More Time," and the addictive "Thinking of You." The least Chic-sounding tune on the album is the ballad "Somebody Loves Me," which favors a classic sweet soul approach and is the type of song one would have expected from Thom Bell, Gamble & Huff, or Holland-Dozier-Holland rather than Rodgers/Edwards. Meanwhile, the intoxicating "Lost in Music" (a #35 R&B hit) is about as Chic-sounding as it gets. When Rhino reissued We Are Family on CD in 1995, it added four bonus tracks, all of which are remixes of either the title song or "Lost in Music." These remixes are intriguing; it's interesting to hear late '70s classics turned into high-tech 1990s dance-pop. But they are less than essential, and the original versions are by far the best -- how can you improve on perfection? Both creatively and commercially, We Are Family is Sister Sledge's crowning achievement. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released December 29, 2003 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released September 23, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released April 25, 1995 | Rhino Atlantic

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Although Sister Sledge had already peaked with their 1979 powerhouse We Are Family LP, they returned in the first half of 1980 with Love Somebody Today. Not quite as successful as its predecessor, but still showcasing the group's remarkable vocal strength, the album foundered primarily because it hit the brick wall laid down by the burgeoning disco backlash, but still managed to peak at number seven on the R&B charts in March. Partnered for the second go-round with Chic's Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers, who wrote and produced all the songs, Sister Sledge spun out a sophisticated, slick set of smooth, mid-tempo R&B that concentrated on the sisters' vocals, leaving the musical arrangements in the background. Both the title track, which proved the album's only major hit, and the melancholy "You Fooled Around" emerged as the set's high points. Elsewhere, "Reach Your Peak" is a surprising combination of disco and jazz, leaving both "I'm a Good Girl" and "How to Love" to weigh in on the ballad front. It would have been hard for Sister Sledge to surpass the monstrously good one-two punch of "We Are Family" and "He's the Greatest Dancer." And, not surprisingly, much of Love Somebody Today sounds flat in comparison. But still, the sounds of Sister Sledge at the peak of their star power are better than much of the pap that passed for pop at the time. ~ Amy Hanson
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Disco - Released August 11, 1992 | Rhino

Sister Sledge evolved quite a bit during the 12 years documented on this 1992 collection, which traces the Philadelphians' evolution from bubblegum soulsters to sexy but wholesome disco-era darlings to struggling urban-contemporary act. After early numbers like "Mama Never Told Me" and "Love Don't You Go Through No Changes on Me" (both recorded at a time when the sisters were still in their teens and came across as sort of a female Jackson 5), they dive headfirst into disco/soul with "Cream of the Crop" (an underrated, Philly-sounding pearl) and finally hit the big time with the Chic-produced mega-hits "We Are Family" and "He's the Greatest Dancer." One hears Sledge entering the '80s on a high note with "Got to Love Somebody" but by the middle of the decade sounding less inspired on the singles "Frankie" and "Dancing on the Jagged Edge." One of the collection's most disappointing tracks is the reggae remix of "He's Just a Runaway." While it's true that this is the version that became a medium-size hit, the more rock-ish version found on All American Girls packs a much greater punch. But despite a few weak spots here and there, this is a gem-laden CD that paints a generally impressive picture of the group. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 25, 1995 | Rhino Atlantic

After recording two albums under the direction of Chic leaders Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards, Sister Sledge surprised the R&B world by working with Narada Michael Walden on All American Girls. The Philadelphia siblings had become identified with the Chic sound, and were ready for a change. It was a gamble that paid off artistically more than commercially. Far from a bomb but not as successful as it deserved to be, the album (reissued on CD in 1995 with informative liner notes by music journalist Gary Jackson) boasts its share of gems, including the hit title song (which, ironically, does have a few Chic-ish touches), the rock-influenced "He's Just a Runaway" and the infectiously funky "Make a Move." Interestingly, "Runaway" didn't became a hit until given a reggae remix that isn't nearly as exciting as the version heard on All American Girls, clearly one of the group's finest accomplishments. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released April 14, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Their last album to hit the charts, 1985's When the Boys Meet the Girls found Sister Sledge attempting to return to past form as they brought Chic's Nile Rodgers back onboard to produce and perform. And although the move would ultimately prove ineffective, as the album appeared and hovered just out of the Top 50, this easy pairing returned the sisters to an earlier edge. With the title track backed by an eclectic arrangement, those classic punchy Sister Sledge vocals were pushed well into the front of the action. The album birthed two further standouts, as both "Frankie," which is spun to become reggae-lite, and the heavily Rodgers-influenced club hit "Dancing on the Jagged Edge" rippled off the grooves. The latter, just barely limping to a paltry number 73 R&B, would prove the band's last hit until their comeback in the early '90s. Elsewhere, the Kathy Sledge-led ballad "You Need Me" emerges the best of the bunch, while the snappy "Peer Pressure" wades into wave territory, leaving the frenetic and not-quite-pleasing "Hold out Poppy" well out of the loop. When the Boys Meet the Girls is a fine effort, but this late in the day it just doesn't pull enough tricks out of the hat to make it worthwhile. And even through it's a major step up from their last effort, Sister Sledge is far better sampled across their earlier R&B heyday. ~ Amy Hanson
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R&B - Released September 23, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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When Sister Sledge recorded their debut album, Circle of Love, in 1974, all four members of the group were still in their teens -- Debbie Sledge, the oldest member, was 19, while the youngest, Kathy, was only 15. However, there's nothing bubblegum about Circle of Love. If Sister Sledge sounded like a female equivalent of the early Jackson 5 on 1973's "Mama Never Told Me," this vinyl LP found the Philadelphians sounding more like a younger version of the Three Degrees (who were also from Philly). This LP had a gem of a single in the haunting "Love, Don't You Go Through No Changes on Me," which wasn't huge but did reach number 31 on the R&B charts. The rest of the album isn't that strong, nor is it in a class with Sister Sledge's late-'70s/early-'80s work with Chic and Narada Michael Walden. Nonetheless, it's a decent, if uneven, collection of Philly soul, and the siblings handle themselves well on material ranging from the Gamble & Huff-minded "Pain Reliever" and the charming "Cross My Heart" to the Thom Bell/Linda Creed ballad "Give in to Love." Circle of Love isn't among Sister Sledge's essential albums, but it has historic value and deserves attention from fans. ~ Alex Henderson

Pop - Released September 30, 2016 | Westmill

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Classic World's Sister Sledge Live! is a budget-priced release of a concert from 1991. Sister Sledge weren't exactly at their peak in the early '90s, even though it sounds like the show would have been entertaining if experienced live in concert. On record, it's flat and featureless, never capturing the energy of the original studio recordings, which are far preferable to this. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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With veteran jazzman-turned-funker George Duke at the production helm and a plethora of well-known musicians -- including Al Jarreau, Michael Sembello, and Jeffrey Osborne -- arrayed behind them, a late-in-the-day Sister Sledge released Bet Cha Say That to All the Girls to moderate success in 1983. While the band's blend of light urban dance was certainly urbane, the sisters were well past the days of the powerhouse R&B diva posturing that brought them to the top of the charts in the 1970s. Sister Sledge was instead bent on bright pop. Leading with the strong charting single "B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Baby)," the rest of Bet Cha Say That to All the Girls unreeled in much the same manner. The superb harmonies and lush strings and horns swing from smooth R&B to light funk and back to classic mainstream pop with ease, as the beautiful ballad "Once in Your Life" and the funky closer "Thank You for the Party," as well as the title track, emerge as the album's real highlights. With perhaps a little too much emphasis placed on a light, bright sound which ultimately sacrifices substance, it's no surprise that this set foundered. Too much sugar can spoil even the sweetest dessert. ~ Amy Hanson
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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released April 25, 1995 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Keeping to their regular routine of releasing an album a year, Sister Sledge emerged in 1982 with The Sisters, their first self-produced effort. Keeping their disco-fied R&B in place, the sisters added a few contemporary kicks to hold their own in a decade fast leaving them behind. The move proved correct, as the group was rewarded with another Top 20 hit. The punchy, horn-heavy, and lightly funky "Super Bad Sisters" not only opens the album in fine style, but also adds a surprising sonic update via a rap from Kenneth and James Williams. Following that feat, though, the rest of the set settles down to soft-edged R&B and mediocre ballads. A less-than-stellar remake of the Mary Wells classic "My Guy" managed to reach number 14 R&B, while a passable duet between Kathy Sledge and David Simmons actually emerges as one of The Sisters' best moments. "Jacki's Theme: There's No Stopping Us," meanwhile, brought the set to a close with its quirky, snap-happy disco grooves. At the end of the day, and despite the fact that it's obvious that the band was still full of good ideas, The Sisters just doesn't reach its full potential. It could be that the band was too far out of its time and place, or that it just didn't have enough oomph to keep its edge, or perhaps it just suffered from production jitters. But ultimately, there are far finer ways to sample the remarkable talents of this R&B powerhouse. ~ Amy Hanson
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Soul - Released October 19, 2018 | CLASSIC WORLD ENTERTAINMENT

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R&B - Released July 11, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Disco - Released December 21, 2009 | Vanilla OMP

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Disco - Released July 20, 2009 | Vanilla OMP