Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$25.49

Classical - Released August 1, 1999 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 7, 2011 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Musical Theatre - Released September 7, 2018 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Leonard Bernstein's 1953 musical Wonderful Town, with song texts by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, hasn't had frequent performances and recordings. It has lots of things going for it: one of Bernstein's memorable tunes in "Ohio" ("Oh, why-o, why-o, why ..."), a conga scene that is inadequately motivated but certainly anticipates West Side Story, and an ensemble cast conception that was certainly known to the writers of A Chorus Line 20 years later. It also has some things going against it: the number "One Hundred Easy Ways to Lose a Man" is retrograde even by the dismal standards of musical theater gender relations, and the storyline is a bit random. Bernstein seems to have acknowledged this with his concert version of the score, which showcases his tunes and his up-to-the-minute familiarity with jazz and Latin rhythms while not weighing itself down with the tale. Rattle and the London Symphony Orchestra are fine, relaxed performers in this repertory, and they deliver a performance that goes beyond usual symphony-orchestra correctness. One wonders how the topical references to American football, Kiwanis clubs, and the like, go down with overseas performers, but Duncan Rock as Wreck seems comfortable with the latter (sample "Pass the Football") and the lead female vocal duo of Australia's Danielle de Niese and the American Alysha Umphress are fine in the more universal theme of small town girls in the big city. The cast's American accents are impressively consistent, probably more so than they would be in a U.S. production, and the sound from this 2017 live recording at the Barbican keeps everything clear. © James Manheim /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released October 1, 2000 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year - Hi-Res Audio
From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released August 5, 2011 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
The ever-brilliant Simon Rattle and the Berlin Philharmonic show off the arranging genius of Arnold Schoenberg, whom listeners might know best for his twelve-tone compositions and pedagogy. The composer, however, arranged Brahms' works for orchestra with so much success, in fact, that one can easily believe they are orchestral works by Brahms himself. The Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor is a perfect example of this. Reworked for a lush, grand orchestra, it begins with a moody theme that repeats throughout the first movement. The tempo picks up and then gives way to lyrical winds and a grand sound that is almost Russian in character. And yet, the orchestra can maintain an airy lightness when the music calls for it. A livelier version of the haunting theme returns in the second movement, and Schoenberg has orchestrated the music so that the instruments are shown off best with their unique timbres. The third movement sounds characteristically Brahmsian, with its dotted rhythms, timpani, and its large scale of the orchestra. This shows Schoenberg's genius, for he truly understands the earlier master and can orchestrate piano music to truly sound like him. The conclusion is a wonderfully vigorous, violent piece that has echoes of Brahms' Hungarian Dances, with its long lyrical lines that contrast with Brahms' legendary counterpoint. It is hard to believe that this was not written by Brahms for orchestra, except for the giveaway: Schoenberg's clever addition of a xylophone. The Accompanying Music to a Film Scene (or, Begleitungsmusik) is just that: very film-like and programmatic. It shimmers with various tone colors, moody and mysterious and full of angst, as the full German title suggests. Once again, it shows off Schoenberg's versatility and brilliance as a composer, how he plays with the listener's expectations by putting a climax earlier than the very end. It has a horror-film quality to it that is stirring, but the piece dies out calmly. The Chamber Symphony No. 1 is not so much a structural piece as it is a flowing one; it is best not to question it, but to go along with it. It evolves seamlessly, using the strings in various unique ways, even including a lovely violin solo in the third movement. One can hear some of the famed twelve-tone method in the second movement as well. Overall, this is a wonderful introduction to Schoenberg for those who might feel intimidated by his less conventional work, but it is also a worthy addition to any Schoenberg fan's collection. © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released August 26, 2013 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Opera - Released March 1, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released January 17, 2005 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Symphonic Music - Released August 12, 2009 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Symphonic Music - Released August 6, 2007 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 7, 2008 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 15, 2010 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released August 1, 2005 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released July 4, 2005 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released March 5, 2007 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Opera - Released September 4, 2003 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 15, 2002 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Classical - Released August 23, 2004 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released August 26, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 16, 2012 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio