Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Caroline International

Hi-Res
An unplugged retelling of many of the band's best-known songs, Simple Minds' Acoustic is an enjoyable if not particularly organic set. Employing the criteria used during the heyday of MTV Unplugged, the veteran Scots do indeed reimagine their catalog using acoustic instruments, though the amount of manipulation via effects and creative mixing makes for something a bit different. The resulting album is a sort of hybrid of stripped-down arrangements with just enough rock sweetening to reach the back seats. In the case of monster hits like "Alive and Kicking" and "Don't You (Forget About Me)," this approach feels a bit underwhelming and bland. While these renditions aren't necessarily bad, it does seem like Simple Minds missed out on an opportunity to dramatically shake up their repertoire in any number of possible directions, but instead settled for simply swapping out the electric guitars and synths with acoustic guitar and piano. The whole point of doing acoustic versions is usually to lay bare the material, deconstructing it down to its roots, but for the most part, Acoustic feels a bit too polished and adjusted. ~ Timothy Monger
CD$31.99

Pop - Released March 25, 2013 | Virgin Catalogue

HI-RES$21.99
CD$18.99

Rock - Released October 4, 2019 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released February 2, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Hi-Res
A few notes are enough to recognize Simple Minds, and thus rediscover their brand. The echo, the lyricism, the mystic rhythmic, the muddled guitars, the choruses calibrated for the stadiums and above all Jim Kerr’s possessed voice: nothing is lacking on this 18th studio album. Forty years after starting their formation which peaked at the top of the charts during the 80s, the Scots don’t try to reinvent themselves here, but rather to rekindle a flame that shone during the last century and that they adapt quite well to 2018. With the help of a sober production, Simple Minds manages to reflect the times without sounding off track. It’s worth noting that this Walk Between Worlds is also the first album of the band since 2002 without drummer Mel Gaynor and keyboardist Andy Gillespie. © CM/Qobuz
CD$31.99

Rock - Released October 21, 1985 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$14.99

Pop - Released March 25, 2013 | Virgin Catalogue

A 36-track anthology, Celebrate: Greatest Hits covers Simple Minds from the band's 1978 debut through 2009's Graffiti Soul. There's also a pair of decent exclusive tracks, "Blood Diamonds" and "Broken Glass Park," recorded specifically for the set. Fanatics could pick apart the track selections, but this provides a high-quality overview of the band's output. Their rapid development from 1978 through 1982 -- a period represented with the likes of "Chelsea Girl," "I Travel," "Love Song," "Promised You a Miracle," and "Speed Your Love to Me" -- was unlike that of any of their peers. The assortment of material taken from the band's later albums is evenhanded, including "Alive and Kicking," "All the Things She Said," "Belfast Child," "Let There Be Love," and "She's a River," all of which reached the Top Ten in the U.K. ~ Andy Kellman
CD$16.49

Rock - Released October 21, 1985 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$8.99

Rock - Released July 15, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2008 | Virgin Catalogue

One prize Simple Minds will never win is for being the most consistent band in the world. Some of their albums have been strong (New Gold Dream, Sparkle in the Rain, and Once Upon a Time, to name a few), while others have been weak and disappointing. Real Life isn't terrible, but play it next to any of those aforementioned albums, and you're reminded how much less inspired their writing had become by the early '90s. Though some of the songs are decent (including the catchy "Stand By Love" and the haunting "Woman"), the majority of them aren't very memorable. Only the most devoted Simple Minds fans will want this generally uneventful CD; more casual listeners would be much better off sticking to the band's mid-'80s work. ~ Alex Henderson
CD$16.49

Rock - Released July 15, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$25.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$35.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2012 | Virgin Catalogue

CD$16.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$31.99

Rock - Released July 15, 2016 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Virgin Records

In less than four years, Simple Minds produced and progressed like few other bands. They released six albums, including a pair of nervy post-punk classics in Real to Real Cacophony and Empires and Dance, as well as the lavish "new pop" triumph New Gold Dream. Their audience expanded, and dates opening for the likes of U2 and the Police placed them in stadiums. The band's sound naturally became less subtle. For Sparkle in the Rain, they sought U2 producer Steve Lillywhite, whose approach helped shape their performances into a forceful, direct set of commercial rock designed to shake nosebleed seats. Despite frontman Jim Kerr's vaguest gesturing and most voluble bellowing to that point, the move worked. The pounding "Waterfront," hurtling "Speed Your Love to Me," and gleaming "Up on the Catwalk," the album's singles, all reached the Top 30 in the U.K., and by the end of the year, the band was headlining North American hockey arenas and amphitheaters. Apart from the brawling "The Kick Inside of Me," which contains one of Kerr's least tethered turns, none of the album cuts matches the urgency heard in the singles. Relatively restrained moments, such as the absurdly titled "'C' Moon Cry Like a Baby" ("Could this be something we don't understand," indeed), resemble stiff stabs at re-creating tense drama akin to the tail end of New Gold Dream. As successful as it was, Sparkle in the Rain merely poised Simple Minds for their biggest year, 1985, when they followed up with "(Don't You) Forget About Me" and "Alive and Kicking," singles that hit the Top Ten in the U.K. and the U.S. ~ Andy Kellman
CD$7.49

Rock - Released October 21, 1985 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Riding the coattails of the John Hughes flick The Breakfast Club, Simple Minds finally broke into America with their theme song "Don't You Forget About Me," and their 1985 release Once Upon a Time captured the heart-wrenching excitement found in bands such as U2. They were now one of the biggest names in music, and Jim Kerr's thirsting vocals became the band's signature. Once Upon a Time, featuring producer Jimmy Iovine (U2, Stevie Nicks, Bruce Springsteen), showcased more of a guitar-driven sound. The band's heavy synth pop beats had relaxed a bit and Charlie Burchill's charming playing style was most noticeable. Also enlisting the choir-like beauty of Robin Clark, Simple Minds' popularity was expounded on songs such as "Alive & Kicking" and "Sanctify Yourself." This album was one of their best, most likely leading the pack in the band's album roster, because it exuded raw energy and solid composition not entirely captured on previous albums. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
CD$44.99
X5

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Virgin Catalogue

CD$10.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2002 | Virgin Records

Hardly content with fumbling around with the same sound, Simple Minds shifted gears once again for album number three, Empires and Dance. The "dance" aspect of the title needs to be emphasized, but it's apparent that the group's globetrotting and simmering political tensions in Britain affected their material in more ways than one. One gets the idea that Simple Minds did some clubbing and also experienced some disparate views of the world. The opening "I Travel" is the most assaultive song in the band's catalog, sounding like a Giorgio Moroder production for Roxy Music. Think "I Feel Love" crossed with "Editions of You," only faster; gurgling electronics, a hyperkinetic 4/4 beat, and careening guitars zip by as Jim Kerr delivers elliptical lyrics about unstable world affairs with his throaty yelping (this was still before he developed that predilection for foghorn bombast). The remainder of the album repeals the blitzkrieg frenetics of the beginning and hones in on skeletal arrangements that focus on thick basslines and the loping rhythms that they help frame. The hopping/skipping "Celebrate" isn't much more than a series of handclaps, a light drum stomp, some intermittent bass notes, and some non-intrusive synth effects. It goes absolutely nowhere, yet it's more effective and infectious than most verse-chorus-verse pop songs. The seven minutes of "This Fear of Gods," which boast another dense rhythm abetted by trebly atmospheric elements (distant guitars, percolating electronics, sickly wind instruments), come off like an excellent 12" dub, rather than an original mix. Just as bracing, the paranoiac disco of "Thirty Frames a Second" should have been played regularly at every club in 1980 and should live on as a post-punk dance classic. It's a true shock that this record was released with reluctance. The band coerced an unimpressed Arista into pressing a minimal amount of copies for release (fans still had trouble locating copies), but thankfully Virgin reissued it in 1982. ~ Andy Kellman
CD$7.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | Virgin Records

CD$2.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records