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Jazz - Released May 22, 2020 | Arc Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Impulse!

Organist Shirley Scott focuses on swing-era tunes throughout this enjoyable CD reissue. Four songs showcase her organ accompanied by a 17-piece big band arranged by Oliver Nelson while the remaining six numbers find her jamming with a trio that also includes either George Duvivier or Richard Davis on bass and Grady Tate or Ed Shaughnessy on drums. Although nothing all that unexpected occurs, it is fun to hear an organ performing such numbers as "For Dancers Only," "Little Brown Jug" and "Stompin' At The Savoy." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 16, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released February 28, 2012 | Rhino Atlantic

One of Scott's best albums, Shirley Scott and the Soul Saxes finds the organist on a 1969 set of mostly soul covers. This was one of her few dates for the soul-heavy Atlantic label, but it certainly qualifies as a standout in the entire soul-jazz catalog. Joined by the royal sax trio of David Newman, King Curtis, and Hank Crawford, Scott plies her smooth, yet deep B-3 alchemy atop a stellar rhythmic pulse supplied by Chuck Rainey, Bernard "Pretty" Purdie, and Richard Tee. And this fine contingent does not fail to please, especially on a joyous take of "More Today Than Yesterday" and the gospel-infused "I Wish I Knew (How It Feels Like to Be Free)." The versions of classics by the Isley Brothers, Aretha Franklin, and the Beatles aren't bad either. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 31, 2019 | nagel heyer records

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Jazz - Released May 1, 2013 | Stardust Records

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Pop - Released October 16, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

Organist Shirley Scott's first of three Atlantic LPs (all are very difficult to find these days) was her last recording with her husband, tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine, who would soon gain great fame along with a divorce. Although Scott plays well enough and the supporting cast (which includes guitarist Eric Gale) is funky, the material is quite erratic, including Ray Stevens' "Mr. Businessman," "Like a Lover" (which has a rare vocal by the organist), and "Blowin' in the Wind." This collector's item has its interesting moments, but it is one of Shirley Scott's less significant dates. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Candid Productions

Recent trio session with Scott and Arthur Harper (b) and Mickey Roker (d). The twist is that Scott is playing acoustic piano throughout. It's not the usual sound, but she can play that thing. © Michael Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 1, 2015 | MMT

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Jazz - Released February 1, 2015 | MMT

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1967 | Verve Reissues

Trio. Album includes one Scott original. The rest, including the classic title track, are standards. A bit sweet. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Candid Productions

One of Shirley Scott's last viable recordings before she passed away is a sweet, delicious collection of jazz standards and originals with a fresh-faced group that the organist was happy she was able to present, if the music is any indication. Young trumpeter Terell Stafford and tenor saxophonist Tim Warfield -- friends and colleagues going back to their college days -- make for a formidable and compatible front line. They trade melody lines and work in tandem on a sonorous level that reflects a brotherhood and agreed vision within the modern mainstream idiom. With veteran bassist Arthur Harper (ex-John Coltrane) and drummer Aaron Walker, this cohesive quintet takes off, with Scott's sympathetic and underscored style laying back to allow her young men to soar, fly, and swing. The band fairly bristles with excitement on the Panamanian freedom song "Carnival," as strong horn lines go back and forth, then a subdued organ solo settles the song down. The title track, the classic Benny Carter tune, lopes along over 11 very soulful minutes with wonderful harmony from Stafford and Warfield -- perfect no-fault jazz. Scott is supportive to the maximum during Irving Berlin's "Remember," a great example of how she refuses to upstage or get in the way of her young charges. Harper's atypical role as a bassist in an organ combo also allows the horn players to take charge further, in Stafford's case when he leads off on his easygoing original "D.T. Blues," or alongside Warfield during Scott's airy Brazilian tribute to Harold Vick, "What Makes Harold Sing?" Where "Shades of Bu" is clearly dedicated to Art Blakey in its swing/shuffle beat, there are also distinct echoes of John Coltrane in this definitive straight-ahead music that reflects the best of '60s jazz. Scott, always mindful of romantic moments, sets the horns aside for a purely heart-wrenching, ultra-slow take of Percy Sledge's "When a Man Loves a Woman" with a gospel flavoring. On this solid top-to-bottom recording, and one of her better contemporary efforts, Shirley Scott carries on fine and mellow, emphasizing her strengths and letting her very capable band do the work while she lingers in her own serene, soulful way. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 15, 2020 | Arc Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Swing Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Candid Productions

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 13, 2010 | Musicworks - EMG