Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$16.49

Vocal Jazz - Released November 10, 2017 | Decca (UMO)

It’s always some kind of baptism of fire. Not a prerequisite but a way to measure oneself to one’s colleagues from yesterday and today. With the aptly named Standards, his tenth studio album, Seal climbs the Everest of the great jazz and swing classics. After three decades, the Brit doesn’t have anything to prove anymore about the soul quality of his voice. But this retro-flavored enchanted digression reminds us of how this powerful and sultry organ can master any repertoire. Recorded for the most part in the famous Capitol studios in Los Angeles, precisely where Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Nat “King” Cole and many others have recorded some of their greatest discs, Standards has incidentally been created with the help of musicians that have assisted these great voices. We find pianist Randy Waldman (Frank Sinatra, Paul Anka), bass player Chuck Berghofer (Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles) and drummer Greg Fields (Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder), all gathered so that Seal would give his reinterpretations of Autumn Leaves, I Put A Spell On You, Love For Sale, My Funny Valentine, I've Got You Under My Skin, Smile, I'm Beginning To See The Light and Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow. “This is the album I have always wanted to make, explains the concerned party. I grew up listening to music from the Rat Pack era, so recording these timeless tunes was a lifelong dream. It was a true honour to collaborate with the same musicians who performed with Frank Sinatra and so many of my favourite artists, in the very same studios where the magic was first made – it was one of the greatest days of my recording career.” We can easily imagine that… © CM/Qobuz
From
CD$17.99

Pop - Released January 24, 2012 | Reprise

From
CD$15.49

Pop - Released April 17, 2012 | Warner Records

From
CD$11.49

Pop - Released August 19, 2003 | Warner Records

This EP explores the full range of Seal's talents, and might even be worth considering as a second Seal purchase. There are a few versions of "Killer," including a clubby Trevor Horn remix that highlights Seal's tendency towards dance-pop. There is also a live version of the single, followed by a cover of "Hey Joe." It is not as strong as his version of "Manic Depression" that appeared on the Stone Free Jimi Hendrix tribute album, but it does remind the listener of the debt that Seal constantly acknowledges to Hendrix. The real gem of the EP is the non-album track, "Come See What Love Has Done." For those who love the ballads on his second album, this song completely anticipates the direction that he took. Unfortunately, he took it too far for his third album, and certainly, this EP should be purchased before suffering the mellow bubblegum of Human Being. © Joshua David Shanker /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Pop - Released November 18, 2003 | Warner Records

From
CD$1.49

Film Soundtracks - Released March 11, 2016 | Deep Well - The Passion

From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 4, 2005 | Warner Records

From
CD$15.49

Pop - Released April 20, 2009 | Warner Records

From
CD$21.99

Pop - Released November 12, 2007 | Warner Records

It's hard to call System a comeback, as Seal never really went away (despite the long gaps between albums), but this 2007 album arrived with the greatest anticipation he's had since the mid-'90s, when his second eponymous album arrived just after the twin hits of "Crazy" and "Killer." All that anticipation had little do with Seal's music, it had more to do with his sudden re-emergence as tabloid fodder in the wake of his 2005 marriage to supermodel Heidi Klum. In the wake of the runaway reality TV hit Project Runway, Klum's star never burned brighter, and its luminescence spilled over to Seal as well, helping to propel him back to the spotlight. Stature so increased, Seal decided to ditch longtime producer Trevor Horn and hire Stuart Price, Madonna's collaborator for her calculatedly retro-disco Confessions on a Dance Floor. Seal employed Price for a similar purpose but instead of reaching way back into the electro past, he decided to revive the house-inflected sound of "Crazy" for System, right down to how the album's opener "If It's in My Mind, It's on My Face" rides a similar stuttering, surging sixteenth-note hook into its chorus. System may be a dance album but it never feels as if its meant for clubs and parties, unless they're upscale cocktail parties. This may not be as soft as the music he made after "Kiss from a Rose," but the feel is the same: it's calming, atmospheric music, even when the beat pulsates relentlessly, as on "Dumb" or "The Right Life." As this is an appealing sound, System goes down smooth, even if it's rather strange that it is so nostalgic for the pre-Clinton '90s, but this is so much a production piece that, apart from the acoustic "Rolling," the only song that stands outside of the sheer sonic gloss is "Wedding Day," a genuinely odd piece of kitsch duet with Heidi herself. She acquits herself well as the spouses exchange pledges of devotion, but it's just too silly to take seriously, yet it's so sincere in its convictions that it is more grabbing than the rest of the record. And it just may be appropriate that Heidi Klum dominates System, as she is the one responsible for Seal's return to the limelight, after all. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$14.49
7

R&B - Released November 2, 2015 | Warner Records

From
CD$18.99

Pop - Released January 17, 2010 | Warner Records

Following Seal’s first compilation by five years, Hits covers much of the same ground as Best: 1991-2004: a whopping ten of its 18 songs are also on Best, including every one of his big hits (“Kiss from a Rose,” “Crazy,” “Killer,” “Prayer for the Dying”), with the remaining eight tracks including two new cuts bookending the album and singles released since Best. This makes it more comprehensive and complete than Best, but casual fans can be excused for thinking that there’s not much difference between the two compilations for the very fact that Seal hasn’t had many big hits since 2004, with not a single single crossing over into the American Top 40 (“Amazing” and “The Right Life” appeared on the dance charts, “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” on the adult contemporary). So, anybody who already has Best: 1991-2004 will not be tempted by this, but anyone in the market for a Seal hits collection will find this generous and enjoyable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$1.49

Ambient/New Age - Released October 30, 2015 | Warner Records

From
CD$1.49

Pop - Released August 5, 2003 | Warner Records

From
CD$14.49

Dance - Released February 17, 2009 | Warner Records

From
CD$2.49

Pop - Released January 31, 2011 | Reprise

From
CD$3.99

Pop - Released October 26, 2004 | Warner Records

From
CD$12.99

Dance - Released February 17, 2009 | Warner Records

This EP explores the full range of Seal's talents, and might even be worth considering as a second Seal purchase. There are a few versions of "Killer," including a clubby Trevor Horn remix that highlights Seal's tendency towards dance-pop. There is also a live version of the single, followed by a cover of "Hey Joe." It is not as strong as his version of "Manic Depression" that appeared on the Stone Free Jimi Hendrix tribute album, but it does remind the listener of the debt that Seal constantly acknowledges to Hendrix. The real gem of the EP is the non-album track, "Come See What Love Has Done." For those who love the ballads on his second album, this song completely anticipates the direction that he took. Unfortunately, he took it too far for his third album, and certainly, this EP should be purchased before suffering the mellow bubblegum of Human Being. © Joshua David Shanker /TiVo
From
CD$1.49

R&B - Released September 11, 2015 | Warner Records

From
CD$6.49

Pop - Released January 6, 2004 | Warner Records

From
CD$8.99

Pop - Released January 4, 2005 | Warner Records