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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 26, 2019 | Top Dawg Entertainment - Interscope Records

Booklet
“He have credits on all my shit because I’ll do the lyrics and I do everything, and he’ll hear something [like], "Drop the beat out hard. Cut this verse off. You did this verse too long’’ He pretty much do all my ad libs and song placements and stuff like that.” A huge vocal absentee in CrasH Talk, Q’s fellow artist, Kendrick Lamar of the label T.D.E, remains front and center with regards to production. Qualitative rather than quantitative, this fifth opus arrives after the passing of Mac Miller and Nipsey Hussle. Out of respect, Q delayed releasing his record into such a morbid situation that still shows no sign of fading. The L.A. schoolboy is joined by YG, Travis Scott (Chopstix), Ty Dolla $ign, 21 Savage (Floating), Kid Cudi (Dangerous) and Lil Baby (Water) in order to deliver one of the best records of early 2019. But Gang Gang, the creepy 5200 and CrasH are testament to the fact that the repentant gangsta hits just as hard solo. In the hands of Boi-1da, CrasH Talk moves through bass heavy trap (Die Wit Wm), R&B (Lies) and shades of old-school (Crash and his sample of DJ Premier). Excellent. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 8, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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By 2016, anything associated with the Top Dawg Entertainment/Black Hippy crew was considered "highly anticipated" by the hip-hop faithful, but no one in the posse had come close to the crossover success of superstar MC Kendrick Lamar. Team member Schoolboy Q was the crown prince, although his mix of gangsta rap and left-field production had failed to make him a household name, something The Blank Face LP holds dear. This sprawling, cumbersome, and often psychedelic effort feels like a glorious clearing house for the diverse and deep rapper, offering giant, cinematic, and challenging efforts like the Anderson Paak-featuring title track and the opening epic, "Torch," then shifting gear and getting flippant with oddball throwaways like the ultra-nasty "Studio" sequel called "Overtime." "Overtime" at least goes off-the-charts, sounding as if R&B porno artist Blowfly was mimicking R. Kelly's or guest vocalist Miguel's sexy styles, and while the beat Tyler, the Creator crafts for "Big Body" could be his silliest to date, Tha Dogg Pound still act if it's prime strip club stuff, and it's as fascinating to hear as it is odd. If "By Any Means" sounds like an important anthem for a year when race relations are at a new low, it begins "You can f**k my b*tch/You can have my ho" and goes more gutter from there, and while that makes it arguably disposable compared to the proud anthem "Ride Out" or the wonderful rumination called "Kno You Wrong," this 17-track, almost-mixtape is no slog on first listen. Fully-formed stunners like the Jadakiss feature "Groovy Tony/Eddie Kane" and "Tookie Knows II" are cold-blooded classics, and even if return visits require some dropped cuts, there's an awesome, tight album hiding inside this set of tracks, a set where the B-sides sneak in. As a release born firmly in the age of streaming, playlists, and The Life of Pablo, it's a sprawling album to argue about and examine. In Schoolboy Q's discography, it's the experimental LP with an attitude, and a giant Magical Mystery Tour that will dazzle his fans. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2014 | Schoolboy Q

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Miscellaneous - Released January 11, 2011 | Top Dawg Entertainment - ScHoolboy Q

Dividing his time between socially conscious rap and bud smoker’s anthems, ScHoolboy Q makes quite the impression on his debut “street album”: the polished, funky, well-balanced, and rewarding Setbacks. Think Mos Def meets Murs on an especially hazy, West Coast weekend and you’ve got the idea, but this ScHoolboy offers some unique ideas on top of it. He’s a complex, mature young man who worries about his kids consuming too much fast food (the straight forward “Figg Get Da Money”) but he’s also a dude who can’t help letting go, diving headfirst into a bong when work is done (the dreamlike “Light Years Ahead”). “What’s the Word” with fellow Black Hippy member Jay Rock, is a radio-friendly number that deserves a lavish party video while the following “iBETiGOTSUMWEED” is the kind of looped, scratchy soul the Madlib and Stones Throw crowd crave. Talented on either end of the spectrum, ScHoolboy Q delivers both with the same skill and cool head, all while keeping his own identity up front. Setbacks wants to come off as just slightly more important than a mixtape, but this casual release is a big contribution to the “true hip-hop” movement. ~ David Jeffries

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 8, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 16, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2014 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2013 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 8, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 5, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 11, 2011 | Top Dawg Entertainment

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 26, 2019 | Top Dawg Entertainment - Interscope Records

Booklet
ScHoolboy Q is accustomed to abortive studio sessions, but following Blank Face LP -- its grim sameness left him acutely unsatisfied -- he recorded and binned not one, not two, but three albums. Once CrasH Talk was completed, he withheld it, unprepared to enter a promotional cycle that would involve questions about late close friend Mac Miller, and then delayed its release a little longer in response to the murder of Nipsey Hussle. Dedications are made to both departed artists in the liners of CrasH Talk, an album that isn't without moments as bleak and bleary as anything in Q's back catalog. There's a whole lot of self-medication, loss of faith, denial, mistrust, and dejection. Resigned premonitions about the consequences of being caught in his daredevil lifestyle are laid out on the trudging "Tales," in a way as unsettling as any scenes with blood spill: "Probably miss my mom funeral, my daughter a ho, because the man of the house ain't the man no mo'." Over the slow, stretched-out funk of "CrasH," however, there's real-life turnaround with better results -- "Got my daughter that mansion, got my mother that million" -- punctuated by assertions of black pride and wisdom, if sharply of critical of the younger generation's strictly materialistic rappers. The block-prowling hard stuff, specifically "Numb Numb Juice," "5200," and "Die Wit Em" (the first two are among six cuts co-written by Kendrick Lamar), is sparingly and effectively dealt out across the album. No mere concessions to the portion of Q's base that might clown him for picking up golf, they land each time with brute force. At 40 minutes, this is easily Q's leanest LP. It would be meaner with the removal of the inane Travis Scott collaboration "CHopstix," the uncharacteristic single. ~ Andy Kellman
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Miscellaneous - Released October 11, 2011 | Top Dawg Entertainment

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 16, 2016 | Schoolboy Q

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 5, 2016 | Schoolboy Q