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Alternatif et Indé - Released January 3, 2020 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released February 5, 2008 | Euphobia

Say Hi -- whose name was mercifully shortened from Say Hi to Your Mom and by now is more of an Eric Elbogen solo project than a band -- doesn't try too many new tricks on The Wishes and the Glitch, an album recorded by the man himself at his home in Seattle, his new headquarters. The same guitars and drum machines and keyboards, plenty of keyboards, layer warmly behind Elbogen's mournful, half-Chris Martin/half-emo voice as he sings his observations of love and heartache. The album, his sixth, actually fits in very nicely with his new location, especially the Seattle-based Barsuk label (from whom Say Hi briefly borrows Harvey Danger's John Roderick and Pedro the Lion's David Bazan), a melodically driven record where the sweetly melancholic lyrics take center stage, where the live instruments keep trying to break into Postal Service indie electronica but never quite make it. Unfortunately, the words themselves don't always stand up to the scrutiny put upon them by the unassuming instrumentation. The chorus of "Zero to Love," instead of playing with the witticism that the title allows, chooses the cliché ("This new heart of mine goes from zero to love in no time"), and while Elbogen often employs a kind of free verse in his rhyme scheme, the words don't deserve the attention they're given because of this, actually sticking out more because of the space allowed, coming across as if they're trying much too hard to be profound and funny and smart. "Magic Beans and Truth Machines," for example, is a little uncomfortable in its forced metaphors ("These magic beans are useless/I got them because she said they'd work like a charm/But she is gone...") and "Apples for the Innocent," too, can't quite achieve the nonchalant insightfulness it strives for. This is not to say there aren't some pretty decent indie pop songs here -- the ambiguous "Bluetime," the hopeful "Northwestern Girls" -- and nothing on The Wishes and the Glitch is even close to downright bad; but it's a case of over-extension, which although it can be pleasant, never quite achieves the statement it and Say Hi are longing to make. ~ Marisa Brown
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Alternatif et Indé - Released September 7, 2018 | Euphobia

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Set in motion by a dream involving a chatty centaur named David Bowie, Caterpillar Centipede sees the revival of Eric Elbogen's long-running indie rock act, Say Hi. Having previously shelved the project after 2015's vampire-themed Bleeder's Digest, the Seattle-based musician launched the similarly offbeat sci-fi/rap vehicle Werewolf Diskdrive, with the intention of it becoming his primary musical outlet going forward. Thanks to the intervention of Bowie (the centaur), Elbogen opted instead to refocus his attention on the attributes that earned Say Hi its fervent fan base in the first place. Refreshingly theme-less, Caterpillar Centipede (a name also gleaned from the dream) sets its sights on producing especially catchy tunes (earworms) with a punchy stripped-down guitar-driven feel. With no vampires or robots populating the landscape, Elbogen often leans toward introspection and matters of the heart on cuts like "Don't Go Like That, No," "Neon Signs," and "Dreaming the Day Away." Balancing the album's tenderer aspects are riffy, more straightforward rockers like "Mathematicians" and "I Just Wanna Go Home." Though slightly less ambitious in subject matter than some of his earlier releases, there's a nice worn-in feel to much of the album, which doesn't try to beat you over the head with its quirkiness. Elbogen has plenty of talent and charisma as a writer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist, but sometimes a more subdued approach gets the point across just as well. ~ Timothy Monger

Alternatif et Indé - Released September 4, 2018 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released January 10, 2020 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released January 25, 2019 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released March 3, 2009 | Euphobia

Several releases into his pseudonym-driven songwriting career, Eric Elbogen (aka the artist formerly known as Say Hi To Your Mom) has made his most aggressive bid for indie rock credibility yet on his sixth LP. At its finest moments, like the would-be teen loneliness anthem “Maurine,” OOHS & AAHS is like the soundtrack that never existed for THE LAST AMERICAN VIRGIN, with a bit more esoteric college-rock charm. For the most part, Elbogen aims to make a satisfying pop record that pulls out all the hand-clapping, keyboard-adoring, passionately longing stops, especially on first-half, Rentals-worthy rousers like “Hallie And Henry.”
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Alternatif et Indé - Released June 7, 2005 | Euphobia

Alternatif et Indé - Released December 13, 2019 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released December 20, 2019 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released January 24, 2020 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released February 10, 2004 | Euphobia

Say Hi to Your Mom's Eric Elbogen only wants to "play pop music of the future" while taking many inspirations from being a witty geek with a soft heart who likes to collect records and wishes that the girl of his dreams would notice him. He nurtures and laughs at being rejected throughout the ten-song indie rock set on Numbers & Mumbles. Fans of Grandaddy, Weezer, and Momus should appreciate Say Hi to Your Mom's almost whimsical demeanor. That's not to say that Elbogen is being a totally capricious on this sophomore effort, but he writes about what he knows and turns it into a kitschy lo-fi storm of calculated synth and organ beats, layered guitar riffs, and hushed monotone vocals. The new wave twitching of "Hooplas Involving Circus Tricks and "But She Beat My High Score" are much more lyrically brawny than the playful "A Hit in Sweden" and the Pixies-like "Your Brains vs. My Tractorbeam." The one thing that's constant throughout Numbers & Mumbles is Elbogen's desire to have as much fun as he possibly can with each song's composition. Whether he's spouting off about Brooklyn hipster kids or swooning over the kissing game or mind trips into space, Say Hi to Your Mom possess a real kind of innocence that his predecessors barely tap into anymore. ~ MacKenzie Wilson
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Alternatif et Indé - Released July 25, 2006 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released September 18, 2015 | Barsuk Records

Prolific Seattle-based pop oddball Eric Elbogen, still operating under his Say Hi moniker, offers up the second vampire-themed concept album of his career. Yes, while most bands are still trying to gather together their first collection of mythical being odes, Elbogen has already produced a sequel to 2006's Impeccable Blahs. The tone is set by opener "The Grass Is Always Greener," a strident, dark little rocker that introduces the character of Jenny who, for reasons unexplained, hurls a large boulder at her vampire neighbors who have yet to show her any aggression. There are songs about how much the vampires like the ladies ("It's a Hunger" and "Transylvania [Torrents of Rain, Yeah]"), songs about arrogant vampires driving humans from their homes ("Pirates of the Cities, Pirates of the Suburbs"), and offbeat references to the Ramones and Eddie Van Halen ("Teeth Only for You"). When Elbogen is at the top of his game, his eccentric indie pop works, as on "Creatures of the Night" and the romantic invitation to immortality "Galaxies Will Be Born." Even if a lot of his material sounds similar, there are some unique and artful ideas contained within many of these songs. The frustrating part about so many of Say Hi's albums, and Bleeders Digest is no exception, is trying to get past the overextended witticisms and the quirky subject matter that either feel telegraphed or not quite thought out. It's OK not to have a lot of depth in pop music, but musically, this album isn't very different from the type of bedroom pop he's been making all along, and revisiting a previously exhausted lyrical vehicle like vampires does little to freshen up the Say Hi brand. There's no doubt that Impeccable Blahs had its fans, but aside from a few highlights, Bleeders Digest feels like a sequel no one was holding their breath for. ~ Timothy Monger
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Alternatif et Indé - Released June 17, 2014 | Barsuk Records

Alternatif et Indé - Released August 27, 2018 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released August 6, 2002 | Euphobia

Between Say Hi to Your Mom and Dogs Die in Hot Cars, 2004 is likely to go down in rock history as The Year We Officially Ran Out Of Good Band Names. A one-man-band from New York (his own mom knows him as Eric Elbogen), Say Hi to Your Mom specialize in the sort of bare-bones D.I.Y. indie pop with little middle ground: many will love the bedroom-four-track intimacy of this album and revel in the low-intensity, medium-fi performances and lyrics that manage to sound intensely personal and completely opaque at the same time. Others will tell Elbogen to come back when he's got a drummer who doesn't sound like he's scared of waking up the people in the next apartment, and a musical palette that keeps the songs from sounding quite so much alike as they do here. Their loss, because once you look past the small deficiencies in recording and arrangement (not that hard to do), Discosadness has a lot of catchy tunes with interesting, oddball lyrics. Although not all the songs are as immediately appealing as the opening "The Fritz," which owes a little to Beck, close listening reveals the album's charms. Fans of Dump, East River Pipe, or pretty much any self-released indie EP that came out between 1994 and 1997 will find a lot to like here. ~ Stewart Mason

Alternatif et Indé - Released December 6, 2019 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - Released July 25, 2018 | Euphobia

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Alternatif et Indé - To be released February 7, 2020 | Euphobia

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