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Pop - Released June 14, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Around the world, Sandie Shaw is sometimes remembered as the "other" Petula Clark, since she was one of relatively few female vocalists from Britain to crack the American charts in the '60s. Nevertheless, she created some appealing ear candy, achieving 14 U.K. Top 40 hits within a five year stretch, including the three early singles that defined her success in the U.S., "(There's) Always Something There to Remind Me," "Girl Don't Come," and "Long Live Love". This comprehensive one-disc summary of Shaw’s career features every hit single alongside a handful of non-charting slices of pure pop that also deserve their place here, including her summer 1968 take on Harry Nilsson’s “Together”. Shaw’s final U.K. no.1 -- the 1967 Eurovision Song Contest-winning “Puppet on a String” - is also present, as is “Hand in Glove” her 1984 collaboration with The Smiths. © Greg Adams & James Wilkinson /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 1, 1965 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Even if you're in the Sandie Shaw cult, you might be disappointed, even aghast, at the quality of her debut LP. From every standpoint, it betrayed hasty execution--wafer-thin production, shoddy original material (none of her early singles are included), lousy covers of American and British pop and rock hits, and one-dimensional vocalizing and interpretive skills from Sandie herself. The British public didn't care, sending it to #3 in the charts; in fact, it was her most successful album in the U.K. The LP was reissued in its entirety as part of the 55-track 64/67 Complete Sandy Shaw, where listeners can easily skip it or program its omission if they want to stick with the singles. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1969 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

On her last album of the '60s, Shaw proved that she was hipper than a lot of people would have suspected. Moving away from the usual light pop and MOR, she chose a set of covers heavy on material by the likes of Bob Dylan, the Lovin' Spoonful, the Rolling Stones ("Sympathy for the Devil"!), Led Zeppelin's "Your Time Is Gonna Come" (double exclamation point!), Donovan, Dr. John, and the Bee Gees. Which doesn't mean it's a great album. It's thoughtfully arranged and energetically delivered, but Shaw's slight, wispy voice is as ill-suited for some of the material as a nun is for the mosh pit. Hearing her attempt even the slightest hint of funky menace, as on "Sympathy for the Devil" and Dr. John's "Mama Roux," is apt to induce snickers, however heartfelt the endeavor might have been. On the other hand, there's a nifty, slinky, jazzy cover of the Beatles' "Love Me Do," and her version of the Spoonful's "Coconut Grove" is also good. [The 2004 CD reissue on EMI adds two bonus tracks: a cover of Paul McCartney's "Junk"" and "Frank Mills" from Hair.] © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1967 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Fresh from her triumph at the 1967 Eurovision Song Contest, Shaw concentrated on determinedly MOR pop (not pop/rock) material on her third album. The program focused on songs by Jacques Brel, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Cole Porter, and the like, with only two contributions by her longtime songwriter Chris Andrews. She's no Barbra Streisand, to put it mildly, and the results held little charm either for her fan base or the larger adult market that she may have been trying to reach. The CD reissue is made more palatable by the addition of both sides of four 1967-68 singles, almost all of which were written by Andrews. These are more consistent with the pop/rock lite of her mid-'60s work, but are weaker than her biggest hits, although "Tonight in Tokyo," "You've Not Changed," and "Today" all made the UK Top 30; the Motown-influenced B-side "Stop" may be the highlight of the batch, although that's not saying much. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released January 1, 1968 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Consisting of songs performed on her short-lived BBC television series, The Sandie Shaw Supplement was a very mixed bag, reflecting the repertoire of the all-around entertainer that she was apparently trying to become. The renditions of pop standards are okay, and the covers of pop-rock hits like "Satsifaction," "Homeward Bound," and "Route 66" mediocre-to-embarrassing; there are also some tunes like "Change of Heart" that are reasonable continuations of her pure pop singles of the mid-'60s. It's a very uneven effort--selected tracks will be enjoyed by her fan club, but it will convert few new listeners to her cause. The CD reissue on RPM adds eight tracks from 1968-69 singles, mixing competent Chris Andrews-penned throwbacks to the vintage Shaw sound with some of her worst material (the vaudevillian "Show Me," an ill-conceived cover of "Those Were the Days"). But one of the singles, 1969's "Monsieur Dupont," would be her last big British hit. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released February 1, 1988 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

British pop star Sandie Shaw had already passed through phases of being a teenage sensation, fashion designer, cabaret singer, and musical writer by the time her influence made it to the ears of the young Manchester band the Smiths in the '80s. Morrissey had championed Shaw's smoky girl group odes to loneliness as much as he borrowed from them, and by the time of 1988's Hello Angel, the two had become good friends and even collaborators. While the album has its ups and downs, the five songs co-penned by Morrissey, including three tunes from the time of the Smiths' first album ("Jeane," "I Don't Owe You Anything," and an especially dark version of "Hand in Glove") are essential for any fan to understand the circle of influence. Shaw is remarkable in her own right, but this particular moment of cross-pollination yields results at times even more delicate and nuanced than the Smiths' originals. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1969 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

On her last album of the '60s, Shaw proved that she was hipper than a lot of people would have suspected. Moving away from the usual light pop and MOR, she chose a set of covers heavy on material by the likes of Bob Dylan, the Lovin' Spoonful, the Rolling Stones ("Sympathy for the Devil"!), Led Zeppelin's "Your Time Is Gonna Come" (double exclamation point!), Donovan, Dr. John, and the Bee Gees. Which doesn't mean it's a great album. It's thoughtfully arranged and energetically delivered, but Shaw's slight, wispy voice is as ill-suited for some of the material as a nun is for the mosh pit. Hearing her attempt even the slightest hint of funky menace, as on "Sympathy for the Devil" and Dr. John's "Mama Roux," is apt to induce snickers, however heartfelt the endeavor might have been. On the other hand, there's a nifty, slinky, jazzy cover of the Beatles' "Love Me Do," and her version of the Spoonful's "Coconut Grove" is also good. [The 2004 CD reissue on EMI adds two bonus tracks: a cover of Paul McCartney's "Junk"" and "Frank Mills" from Hair.] © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released September 27, 2019 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Me

Pop - Released November 1, 1965 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Shaw's second album was a substantial improvement on her debut in every respect, though hardly a major effort. It helped that Chris Andrews (who wrote most of her hits) supplied a lot of the tunes. and Shaw herself contributed a fair effort with her first original composition, "Till the Night Begins to Die." "Down and Dismal Ways" is as down and dirty as Sandie ever got (which means that it's still pretty innocuous). Still, you can't help wondering how much better Lulu or Dusty Springfield would have done with the same material. No need to look for a rare, pricy copy of the original LP; all of the songs are included on the British double-CD compilation 64-67 Complete Sandie Shaw Set. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo