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Jazz - Released June 21, 2011 | Mack Avenue Records

Booklet
Many critics have lamented the relatively rare appearance of memorable male jazz vocalists over a stretch of several decades. Sachal Vasandani is a promising singer gifted with a wide range and an expressive, strong tone that brings out the essence of each lyric. His third CD finds him backed by pianist Jeb Patton (whose work with the Heath Brothers has garnered considerable praise), bassist David Wong, and drummer Kendrick Scott. The imaginative arrangement of the standard "The Very Thought of You" is a group effort with a strong assist from Erik Privert, utilizing a breezy Latin rhythm and featuring a potent backing line by guest John Ellis on tenor sax. Two duets feature the legendary vocalist Jon Hendricks: a hilarious rendition of "One Mint Julip," which also has some fun-filled scat singing by both men, and Randy Weston's "Hi-Fly," which adds a newly written lyric by Vasandani. The leader's rich voice is best on display with his thoughtful interpretation of "Here Comes the Honey Man" (a duet with Patton), which segues directly into "There's a Boat That's Leaving Soon for New York" (both pieces are from George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess), the latter in which Vasandani's vocal sounds as if it has long been part of his repertoire. The singer also penned several originals, including the hip "Babe's Blues" (featuring the rising young trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire) and the haunting, deliberate ballad "Flood." There's an obvious hint of Frank Sinatra in his moving performance of "All the Way," a duet with Patton that closes the album with a flourish. ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released September 15, 2009 | Mack Avenue Records

Sachal Vasandani's second CD shows he is maturing as a jazz singer and composer, continuing to refine his approach while landing safely in flat fields of open expanse. His voice rarely wavers or explores upper or lower registers; rather, it stays within a comfort zone that avoids much of a challenge. This consistency serves his songs and his audience well, working within a current trend of singers who stay within specific rhythmic boundaries and don't really push the envelope. Vasandani is helped by pianist Jeb Patton and a backing trio that has been with the vocalist for almost a decade, while co-producers John Clayton and guitarist Doug Wamble give him a bit of a push here and there, mixing up standards with subtle originals. The title track shows the most originality in a steady, repeating, and wistful mode; "Ring Road" (contributed by drummer Quincy Davis) has Vasandani in a playful, ever cool mood; and "Don't Worry About Me" has that contemporary hip-hop rhythm originated by Ahmad Jamal under the singer's slick, level-headed style. The old Joe Williams number "By the River St. Marie" is bopped hard within the controlled dynamics of Vasandani's voice, and he goes for some scat on the intro of the combo tune "Once in a While" and Patton's "Horizons." The group covers the chestnuts "No More" and Thelonious Monk's "Monk's Dream," both with lyrics penned by Jon Hendricks, but the results are not optimal or perfect. Where the singer is most convincing crops up in an elegant, confident manner on "Escape/There's a Small Hotel," but especially during "There Are Such Things," a serene interpretation that comes straight from the heart. The most unusual arrangement is more in a baroque or chamber style on the low-key "Royal Eyes," which merges effectively into a small samba. After two recordings, Sachal Vasandani has found somewhat of a niche, but needs to ramp it up creatively and take more chances in order to stand out from the small group of contemporary male jazz vocalists. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released April 3, 2007 | Mack Avenue Records

Sachal Vasandani has an unusual voice, sounding a bit like Art Lund (Benny Goodman's singer in 1946) in his lower register and hinting at Michael Franks in his higher notes although he has a much deeper sound. Vasandani began getting rave reviews for his live performances around 2005, but his debut as a leader is just OK. Perhaps some of his charisma is better experienced live, but he comes across as a subtle and safe singer (despite a wide-ranging repertoire) with a distinctive tone. His performances on this CD are pleasant and nice but not particularly engrossing or memorable, occasionally sounding like a monotone, particularly on his originals. The performances are uplifted by the Jeb Patton Trio and guest spots for Stefon Harris, Marcus Printup and Doug Wamble. Sachal Vasandani clearly has potential, but it is not realized on this early effort. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released March 17, 2017 | Unit Records