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Film Soundtracks - Released November 22, 2019 | Milan

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 14, 2020 | Milan Records

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This short film directed by Luca Guadagnino (Oscar-nominated in 2018 for Call Me By Your Name) tells the story of a disagreement between Francesca (Julianne Moore) and her mother, renowned painter Sophia Moretti (Marthe Keller). In the Italian house where the latter lives a reclusive existence, ghosts from Francesca’s youth come back in an ultimate assault of pain, memory and blossoming. Ghosts go hand in hand with intangibility: with ethereal timbres (on strings and piano) and descending harmonies, the half-scary-half-melancholic music of Ryuichi Sakamoto (Furyo) effectively translates the supernatural aspect of the film while still managing to pay tribute to Psycho and Vertigo’s Bernard Herrmann. But this brilliant score by the Japanese composer doesn’t stop at confronting ghosts of the past. This is a very material work of music, literally: he plays with and uses different fabrics. Produced with Valentino artistic director Pierpaolo Piccioli, The Staggering Girl gave Sakamoto the opportunity to use clothes samples from the fashion house in order to brush them together in different ways in front of highly sensitive microphones. Tracks like The Staggering Girl and Woman in Yellow show this technique in different ways, making Ryuichi Sakamoto one of the most inventive composers of his generation. Quite the opposite of these sensual and supernatural notions, the soundtrack closes with the shining Dance, which features glamourous strings and a minimalist piano. A conclusion to bring you back to present day life. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca (UMO)

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Jazz - Released August 20, 2002 | KAB America, Inc.

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 17, 2015 | Editions Milan Music

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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | KAB America Inc.

The album 1996 contains 12 pieces arranged for violin (Everton Nelson, David Nadien, or Barry Finclair), cello (Jaques Morelenbaum), and piano (Ryuichi Sakamoto), including both new compositions and music used in the soundtracks to The Last Emperor, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, The Sheltering Sky, and High Heels. The music is for the most part restrained and reflective, as Sakamoto makes use of the contrasting timbres of the chamber instrumentation, mixing melodic and rhythmic effects soothingly (the exceptions being the more quick-moving "M.A.Y. in the Backyard" and "1919," which uses a barely audible voice and staccato playing to stirring effect). © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released September 25, 2019 | Sony Music Direct (Japan) Inc.

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Jazz - Released March 27, 2003 | KAB America, Inc.

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 7, 2013 | 12K

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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Milan Records

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Soundtracks - Released November 18, 2016 | Silva Screen Records

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Classical - Released September 6, 2008 | KAB America, Inc.

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 25, 1997 | KAB America Inc.

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Classical - Released April 28, 2017 | Milan

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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Decca (UMO)

In 2009, Universal International released Ryuichi Sakamoto's Playing the Piano, a collection of solo piano pieces he calls “self-covers”; that is, a newly recorded collection of his own compositons and themes performed solo. The set contains 12 selections. They are mostly themes from the films The Last Emperor, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, and The Sheltering Sky, with cues from others including "Bolerish," from Brian DePalma's 2002 film Femme Fatale. For the most part, it is a spare and lovely beauty of an album, with few surpises save for the elegance that Sakamoto performs these indelible pieces with. In 2010, Decca Records in the U.S. re-relased this album as a deluxe edition with a new one entitled Out of Noise, recorded during 2009. It, too, contains a dozen selections, all but one composed and recorded the year of release. This disc is the real surpise in the specially packaged and priced set. It concerns itself where music fades and enters into noise, and the no man's land where noise sorts itself out into a system recognized as music. Unlike Playing the Piano, Out of Noise is a more challenging, yet more compelling listen. While it begins with the poetic, atmospheric solo piano piece "Hibari," as a coda to Disc 1, it quickly launches into "Hwit" and "Still Life," both recorded with the U.K.-based viol ensemble Fretwork. The ambient "In the Red," with field-recorded voice samples, features guitarist Christian Fennesz. In 2008, Sakamoto participated in the Cape Farewell Disko Bay Expedition to study and observe climate change; there he visited Greenland's fastest moving glacier. Three of the pieces here -- "Disko," "Ice," and "Glacier" -- reflect the place where Sakamoto claims he left part of his soul. In them, the sounds of the glaicer and the surrounding landscape were recorded, then treated in the studio and added to by other musicians, including guitarist Keigo Oyamada, vocalist Karen H. Filskov, and Skúlli Sverrisson, who plays dobro on the final one of these. "To Standford" is a solo jazz piano piece, or rather has inside its grain, the beauty and ternderness of great jazz pianists from Bill Evans to Errol Garner to Kenny Drew. Ultimately, it's Out of Noise that makes the entire package worth buying for the first time, or purchasing Playing the Piano again. Despite revealing already known dimensions of Sakamoto's musical persona, it also uncovers new ones. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Ambient - Released June 21, 2005 | KAB America, Inc.

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Pop - Released July 19, 2005 | KAB America Inc.

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 25, 2015 | Milan Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 21, 2000 | KAB America Inc.

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 20, 2015 | 12K