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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
In 2013, rapper El-P - the representative of independent New York rap (with Company Flow, then going solo and creating the label Definitive Jux) – joined up with Killer Mike, a solid street rapper from Atlanta who made a name for himself on OutKast’s debut album. Seven years and three albums later under the name Run The Jewels, the duo has not only become inseparable (and almost exclusive) but also an essential group on the contemporary rap scene. On RTJ4, the two forty-somethings continue to carry the torch for a noisy and rebellious rap inherited from Public Enemy. While the influence of the Bomb Squad, which was tangible even from their first productions in the mid-90s, is more present than ever, El-P stirs up his own sonic revolution and sets fire to all kinds of things by sampling the post-punk group Gang Of Four (the ground below), distinguishing himself over dancehall riddims (holy calamafuck, co-produced by Dave Sitek from TV On The Radio), recording Native American saxophonist Cochemea (a few words for the firing squad (radiation)) and bringing together big names as diverse as Pharrell Williams, Zack de La Rocha, Josh Homme, Mavis Staples and DJ Premier. Articulate and never overly wordy, the two rappers complement each other impressively in their timbres, their flows and their writing. El-P has retained from the golden age of indie rap a taste and talent for double entendres and witty punchlines, and Killer Mike, who in the civilian world has become one of the leading voices on the American left, alongside Bernie Sanders, manages the feat of putting social commentary back at the heart of rap. Being released in the midst of the public uprising in the United States following the death of George Floyd at the hands of the police, RTJ4 is like a real-time and inevitably icy autopsy of Trump's America. © Damien Besançon/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 25, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 24, 2014 | Run the Jewels, Inc under exclusive license to Mass Appeal

There are those Jagger/Richards, Jimmy Jam/Terry Lewis, or DJ Jazzy Jeff/Fresh Prince-styled collaborations that always seem fruitful. The music created by Killer Mike and El-P easily falls into this category, and is closest to that of Jeff and Prince's, not just because the duo fall under the same category of "hip-hop" but also because Run the Jewels 2, like its predecessor, comes with some joy baked in. It's a broken, ironic, and underground kind of joy as the hard-hitting "Oh My Darling Don't Cry" shows its pimp-hand with "You can all run naked backwards through a field of dicks" and also shows its business card because "You're in luck, it says I do two things: rap and fuck." This sophomore effort keeps the slanted spirit of the original, as mixing the attitude of N.W.A. with the weirdness of Adult Swim is both comfortable and fertile ground for the duo, but the "album" does try harder in the "serious" department. Paranoid androids like "Blockbuster Night, Pt. 1" benefit, as if Run-DMC embraced EL-P's compressed beatmaking and dropped the F-bomb whenever possible. "Early" is deadly serious with Killer Mike pleading "I apologize if it seems I got out of line sir, cuz I respect the badge and a gun/And I pray today ain't the day you drag me away right in front of my son," and that's right before things turn grave. "All Due Respect" with Travis Barker enters Death Grips' territory with punk, techno, and vicious rhymes all crawling up the spine, but this rebel music can still come with a smirk, as a stuttering Zach de la Rocha offers the infectious and weird hook on the wonderfully titled highlight "Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)." If the first album was the supernova, RTJ2 is the RTJ universe forming, proving that Mike and El-P's one-off can be a going, and ever growing, concern. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 27, 2014 | Run the Jewels, Inc under exclusive license to Mass Appeal

There are those Jagger/Richards, Jimmy Jam/Terry Lewis, or DJ Jazzy Jeff/Fresh Prince-styled collaborations that always seem fruitful. The music created by Killer Mike and El-P easily falls into this category, and is closest to that of Jeff and Prince's, not just because the duo fall under the same category of "hip-hop" but also because Run the Jewels 2, like its predecessor, comes with some joy baked in. It's a broken, ironic, and underground kind of joy as the hard-hitting "Oh My Darling Don't Cry" shows its pimp-hand with "You can all run naked backwards through a field of dicks" and also shows its business card because "You're in luck, it says I do two things: rap and fuck." This sophomore effort keeps the slanted spirit of the original, as mixing the attitude of N.W.A. with the weirdness of Adult Swim is both comfortable and fertile ground for the duo, but the "album" does try harder in the "serious" department. Paranoid androids like "Blockbuster Night, Pt. 1" benefit, as if Run-DMC embraced EL-P's compressed beatmaking and dropped the F-bomb whenever possible. "Early" is deadly serious with Killer Mike pleading "I apologize if it seems I got out of line sir, cuz I respect the badge and a gun/And I pray today ain't the day you drag me away right in front of my son," and that's right before things turn grave. "All Due Respect" with Travis Barker enters Death Grips' territory with punk, techno, and vicious rhymes all crawling up the spine, but this rebel music can still come with a smirk, as a stuttering Zach de la Rocha offers the infectious and weird hook on the wonderfully titled highlight "Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)." If the first album was the supernova, RTJ2 is the RTJ universe forming, proving that Mike and El-P's one-off can be a going, and ever growing, concern. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 25, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 26, 2013 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 11, 2018 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 26, 2013 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 25, 2015 | Mass Appeal Records II

It started as a Kickstarter joke, but there now exists in this world a remix album cobbled together with adorable cat sounds. Run the Jewels' 2014 critically acclaimed sequel to their debut is not completely cat-ified here (as some fans hoped/expected), but there are enough feline samples (and playful kitty lyrics) to sate fans with a sense of humor. Meow the Jewels is a fuzzed-out, madcap, woozy reimagination of an otherwise thrilling banger of an album. Including remixes by an impressive roster of the new and the legendary (El-P, Just Blaze, Zola Jesus, Prince Paul, Geoff Barrow, Boots, Blood Diamonds, Dan the Automator, and 3D of Massive Attack), Meow is also injected with a little extra humor by ostensible enemy of cats, Snoop Dogg, and famous Internet cutie Lil Bub. Killer Mike and El-P's raps remain aggressive, but the sometimes sludgy remixes drag the energy down, most glaringly on the previously exhilarating Zach de la Rocha explosion "Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)," which is chopped and screwed with hilarious cat meowing. It's very different and quite generous of the duo to humor their fans, but Meow may only speak to RTJ lovers and cat people. Whereas the original Run the Jewels 2 was a perfect soundtrack for a night of mayhem, Meow the Jewels is the comedown after all that rabble-rousing. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 3, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Arriving earlier than expected as both a global pandemic and a nationwide movement against police brutality gripped the United States, RTJ4 distills the anger and frustration of the people through Run the Jewels' hard-hitting, no-nonsense revolution anthems. Trim with no filler, this fourth set from the outspoken duo provides relevant history lessons that are more useful than a classroom textbook. Rousing and lyrically dexterous, Killer Mike and El-P deliver their densest collection yet, balancing clever bon mots with tongue-twisting screeds decrying police brutality, systemic racism, class injustice, and a litany of other ills plaguing the nation. RTJ4 rarely strays from the intensely political; when it does, the duo shine with boastful quips and chest-thumping bravado, loosely weaving their "Yankee and the Brave" personas -- alluding to the baseball teams from their respective home bases -- with production that merges old-school hip-hop nostalgia with aggressively sharp contemporary stylings. BOOTS and Dave Sitek return for the very RTJ-titled "Holy Calamafuck," a menacing attack that's bested only by the clattering "Goonies vs. E.T.," which sounds like a Prodigy track without the techno breakbeat. Additional guests include 2 Chainz on the breathless "Out of Sight"; DJ Premier and Greg Nice on the "DWYCK"-sampling "Ooh La La"; and Mr. Muthafuckin eXquire on the neon dystopia of "Never Look Back." Meanwhile, an unlikely pair join forces on the swirling "Pulling the Pin," with Josh Homme's ghostly wails and Mavis Staples' pained cries creating an RTJ-meets-...Like Clockwork doomscape that pushes back against a power structure that allows for "filthy criminals...at the pinnacle." On album highlight "JU$T," "poet pugilist" Zack de la Rocha and Pharrell Williams join the fight by contributing popping production and a condensed socio-economic lecture, pulling back the curtain to reveal "murderous chokehold cops still earning a living" and "all these slave masters posing on your dollars." On "Walking in the Snow," Mike, El-P and Gangsta Boo tackle the American school-to-prison pipeline and those "chokehold cops," directly invoking the spirit of Eric Garner -- who was killed by Staten Island police in 2014 as he pleaded, "I can't breathe" -- and unwittingly honoring George Floyd, whose murder under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer prompted protests across the globe and pushed RTJ4's early release. Bringing the past and present full circle, Mike reminds listeners to "never forget in the story of Jesus, the hero was killed by the state." Much like reality, the raw and unflinching RTJ4 is a lot to take in, both a balm for the rage and fuel to keep the fire burning. Although eerily prescient, RTJ4 is less prophetic and more a case of deja vu, addressing the endemic issues of a broken country that sadly continue. This has all happened before and, as El-P laments, this is the "same point in history back to haunt us." © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 4, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 24, 2016 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 29, 2017 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 2, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Arriving earlier than expected as both a global pandemic and a nationwide movement against police brutality gripped the United States, RTJ4 distills the anger and frustration of the people through Run the Jewels' hard-hitting, no-nonsense revolution anthems. Trim with no filler, this fourth set from the outspoken duo provides relevant history lessons that are more useful than a classroom textbook. Rousing and lyrically dexterous, Killer Mike and El-P deliver their densest collection yet, balancing clever bon mots with tongue-twisting screeds decrying police brutality, systemic racism, class injustice, and a litany of other ills plaguing the nation. RTJ4 rarely strays from the intensely political; when it does, the duo shine with boastful quips and chest-thumping bravado, loosely weaving their "Yankee and the Brave" personas -- alluding to the baseball teams from their respective home bases -- with production that merges old-school hip-hop nostalgia with aggressively sharp contemporary stylings. BOOTS and Dave Sitek return for the very RTJ-titled "Holy Calamafuck," a menacing attack that's bested only by the clattering "Goonies vs. E.T.," which sounds like a Prodigy track without the techno breakbeat. Additional guests include 2 Chainz on the breathless "Out of Sight"; DJ Premier and Greg Nice on the "DWYCK"-sampling "Ooh La La"; and Mr. Muthafuckin eXquire on the neon dystopia of "Never Look Back." Meanwhile, an unlikely pair join forces on the swirling "Pulling the Pin," with Josh Homme's ghostly wails and Mavis Staples' pained cries creating an RTJ-meets-...Like Clockwork doomscape that pushes back against a power structure that allows for "filthy criminals...at the pinnacle." On album highlight "JU$T," "poet pugilist" Zack de la Rocha and Pharrell Williams join the fight by contributing popping production and a condensed socio-economic lecture, pulling back the curtain to reveal "murderous chokehold cops still earning a living" and "all these slave masters posing on your dollars." On "Walking in the Snow," Mike, El-P and Gangsta Boo tackle the American school-to-prison pipeline and those "chokehold cops," directly invoking the spirit of Eric Garner -- who was killed by Staten Island police in 2014 as he pleaded, "I can't breathe" -- and unwittingly honoring George Floyd, whose murder under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer prompted protests across the globe and pushed RTJ4's early release. Bringing the past and present full circle, Mike reminds listeners to "never forget in the story of Jesus, the hero was killed by the state." Much like reality, the raw and unflinching RTJ4 is a lot to take in, both a balm for the rage and fuel to keep the fire burning. Although eerily prescient, RTJ4 is less prophetic and more a case of deja vu, addressing the endemic issues of a broken country that sadly continue. This has all happened before and, as El-P laments, this is the "same point in history back to haunt us." © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 24, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 25, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 23, 2017 | Run The Jewels, Inc.

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 24, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 18, 2015 | Mass Appeal

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 24, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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