Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$14.99

Country - Released June 28, 2019 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released January 18, 2019 | G-Force Music

Duets, an album released on the eve of Ronnie Milsap's 76th birthday, kicks off with something unexpected: a heavy, clanking blues stomp assisted by ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons, who is only too happy to salute "Southern Boys and Detroit Wheels" with the country singer. The pairing may be slightly unexpected -- Milsap is pure honey, Gibbons a hard patch of gravel -- and the song may not be well-known, but that's what gives the cut a kick that's not often heard elsewhere on Duets. Frequently throughout the album, Milsap and his partners favor the smooth and familiar, playing such big hits as "Stranger in My House," "Happy Happy Birthday," "Lost in the Fifties," or "Smokey Mountain Rain." The latter is distinguished by a game appearance by Dolly Parton, who hits the sweet spot between crowd-pleasing and interpretation. Kacey Musgraves hits that too with "No Getting Over Me" -- hearing her on this simmering, soulful piece of country-pop, it's clear that Golden Hour is indebted to the golden era of yacht-country -- but a lot of the other highlights find Milsap connecting with straight roots of some sort: singing hardcore country with George Strait on "Houston Solution," skipping through the twilight with Willie Nelson on a "A Woman's Love," and getting down and dirty with Leon Russell on "Misery Loves Company." The presence of Russell suggests many of the cuts on Duets may have been sitting around for a while -- he died in 2016, a little over two years prior to this release -- but that doesn't affect how the album plays. Listened to as a whole, without sweating the sources, Duets is an amiable, enjoyable testament to the many different facets of Ronnie Milsap. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Country - Released August 1, 1981 | Craft Recordings

By 1981, Ronnie Milsap had become a superstar and was still riding the crest of the wave that began in the early '70s. But Milsap had taken his version of country music as close as he could get to the pop charts without quite crossing over. In many ways his sound is indicative of the times and the artists making hit records at the same time (Eddie Rabbitt, Ronnie McDowell, Johnny Lee, etc.), but Milsap possessed something that none of the aforementioned did: a direct link to the rock and doo wop sounds of the late '50s and early '60s. His urban country is evidenced in the title track, which was a Top Ten single, has a sweet alto saxophone solo in it, and has a chorus that reflects James Taylor's late-'70s attempts at crooning early rock. And there are Milsap's ballads, such as "It's All I Can Do," "Two Hearts Don't Always Make a Pair," and "Too Big for Words." There's the other single, "I Wouldn't Have Missed It for the World," which is urban cowboy country music in its purest essence and was rewarded with the number one spot for a few weeks in late 1981. The sweeping backing vocals, a harp, a barely present pedal steel added for atmosphere, and enough acoustic guitars to supply an army of big-feathered hat-wearing drugstore cowpokes. It's also an awesome pop song. The chorus alone is so infectious it could be heard being hummed and whistled on street corners and its words being sung in barrooms and dancehalls throughout the rest of 1981. It also, finally, crossed over. There's No Gettin' Over Me is a perfect example of what Milsap was about in his middle period. There's humility in his confidence and a genuine empathy in his croon. Yeah, it's slick, and even schlocky in places ("Jesus Is Your Ticket to Heaven"), but it's also terrific. ~ Thom Jurek
CD$12.99

Country - Released September 29, 1986 | Craft Recordings

Country - Released January 1, 1996 | Capitol Nashville

Download not available
As the title suggests, Ronnie Milsap's Sings His Best Hits for Capitol Records consists of re-recorded versions of ten of his biggest hits -- including "Lost in the Fifties Tonight," "Snap Your Fingers," "(I'm A) Stand by Your Woman Man" and "(There's) No Gettin' over Me" -- which were all originally recorded for RCA Records. Though these new versions aren't particularly bad, they are neither as good or familiar as the originals, making it collection to avoid, especially if you're looking for a strong hits collection. ~ Thom Owens
CD$12.99

Country - Released March 12, 1991 | Craft Recordings

CD$11.99

Country - Released January 1, 1976 | RLG - Legacy

CD$12.99

Country - Released June 27, 2006 | Craft Recordings

CD$11.99

Country - Released July 1, 1974 | RCA - Legacy

Ronnie Milsap had been paying dues as a session musician before cutting a record in 1971 for Warner Bros. that promptly made little impact. Three years later, he moved from Memphis to Nashville, signed with RCA, and released Pure Love. It was kind of like his second debut, a record that found Milsap carving out his own musical identity -- one that brought him to the top of the country charts. Taking cues from Elvis Presley and Charlie Rich (Milsap's cover of "Behind Closed Doors" is a revelation for anyone unfamiliar with his earlier work, since the Rich influence is present throughout Milsap's work), Milsap had a warm, friendly croon and an easy delivery to his music, which made it easy to overlook the hints of soul, gospel, and pop in his music. That's because his mellow country-pop was so relaxed, it simply seemed to exist without any effort. His music only got easier over the years, but on Pure Love, it still had a solid country foundation; while it never had grit, it did have weight and it felt like country music. He also had one of his strongest sets of songs, highlighted by the singles "Pure Love" and "Please Don't Tell Me How the Story Ends," but running deeper than that, thanks to songs like "My Love Is Deep, My Love Is Wide" and "Blue Ridge Mountains Turnin' Green." Milsap may have been sweeter and more romantic than even other country-pop crooners of the '70s, but it made from some good easy listening, and it was rarely better than it was on Pure Love. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Country - Released July 1, 1977 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released May 1, 1982 | Craft Recordings

Inside is arguably the strongest album Ronnie Milsap released at the peak of his slick contemporary country hit-making streak. The key to the album is that its consistency is married to a thoroughly appealing production equal parts Nashville and Californian soft rock. Make no mistake, this is glossy, slick music, but that's its charm -- the surface is seductively slick, giving Milsap's warm baritone a sympathetic musical bed. Though he does dip outside of adult contemporary-oriented country-pop on "I Love New Orleans Music," this truly soars when its feet are planted firmly in the mainstream and he has melodic tales of heartbreak, whether it's on the hits "Any Day Now" and "He Got You" or album tracks like "Hate the Lies - Love the Liar" or "It's Just a Room." These are corny and slick, but they work thanks to their production and Milsap's performances. He had a number of number one singles and albums, but few were better than Inside. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Country - Released March 1, 1983 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released February 1, 1986 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released May 1, 1978 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released February 1, 1980 | Craft Recordings

CD$12.99

Country - Released September 17, 1996 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

CD$8.99

Country - Released September 24, 2002 | Image Music Group

CD$12.99

Country - Released June 7, 1993 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

If only the whole album had the energy of the John Hiatt title track (not to mention the wit of the Hoss Allen intro), Milsap's Liberty debut would have been a record to reckon with. ~ Dan Cooper
CD$8.99

Country - Released September 21, 2004 | Image Music Group

CD$11.99

Country - Released January 1, 1975 | RLG - Legacy