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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | The Neptunes

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | The Neptunes

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released December 12, 2018 | Thicke Music - EMPIRE

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R&B - Released June 29, 2015 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released January 1, 2011 | The Neptunes

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 31, 2015 | Poe Boy - Atlantic

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R&B - Released July 29, 2014 | The Neptunes

A sleeve that would have been a more emblematic model for Robin Thicke's seventh album is that of Robert Goulet's My Love Forgive Me. If Paula bears any other relation to Jimi Hendrix's Band of Gypsys -- the graphic likeness is unmistakable -- it must be far beneath the surface. Like the 1964 Goulet album, Paula deals in remorse and heartache -- ballads that acknowledge fault and plead for mercy. It even has a bossa nova-inspired moment. Yet with Thicke, determining the level of sincerity here is as tricky as ever. He's in entertainer mode to such an extent that he sounds not like an agonized singer/songwriter but more like a reinterpreter/exaggerator of songs that would be more effective with humbled performances. Beyond the relatively light likes of "Get Her Back," even the stripped-down ballads, including "Still Madly Crazy" -- the one song in which he sounds like he is in real pain -- are ostentatious. The most over-the-top song is "Lock the Door," a piano blues ballad; he howls "At least open the doggie door, throw a friend a juicy bone" as if he's going for yucks rather than expressing how low he feels. The album doesn't strictly exploit his separation. In fact, much of it is another form of mess. Some of the songs that could fit on any non-conceptual Thicke release sound like commissioned work. Take "Living in New York City," a distant descendant of James Brown's "Living in America" and Janet Jackson's "Nasty," seemingly made for a visitors bureau, or the equally hammy "Tippy Toes," which could be used to sell a line of footwear. Those aren't the only numbers that resemble frivolous "Hey, we need one more" throwaways. Along with empty flash like "Something Bad" and "Time of Your Life," they're all part of Thicke's least appealing album. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | The Neptunes

Sex Therapy is an evasive maneuver to prevent Robin Thicke from being pigeonholed as a “grown folks” R&B singer. It’s evident that hits -- more specifically, appealing to younger listeners -- is the goal. While Thicke’s previous album, Something Else, did well on the album charts, it maintained a classicist sound throughout, produced only one major single, and featured only one appearance from a guest MC. Sex Therapy, however, enlists Snoop Dogg, Jay-Z, the Game, Kid Cudi, and Nicki “Stick shift the ding-a-ling” Minaj -- not to mention Estelle and Jazmine Sullivan, both of whom contribute excellent background vocals on their respective appearances. Thicke heightens the brashness downplayed on Something Else, best applied on the title track, where the cunning contrast between his masculine certitude and feather-light falsetto is in full effect. That he does it while lifting the melody from “It’s My Party” -- as a near-replication of the pulse from the Art of Noise's “Moments in Love” drifts in the background -- makes it all the more daring and remarkable. Sometimes the results are either dopey (if lighthearted), as on “Meiplé,” or humorously awkward, as on “Shakin’ It 4 Daddy,” where the oft-repeated hook “She shakin’ it for daddy, she shakin’ it for me” must make some listeners think of Thicke and his father instead of just Thicke. The album does not represent a total abandonment of the qualities that have connected with the singer’s adult fans. “Mrs. Sexy,” based on Eric B. & Rakim's Al Green-sampling “Mahogany” (to the point where he does not bother to change a line that references his skin tone), is as buttery and elegant as anything he has recorded. On “Million Dolla Baby,” he takes his Marvin Gaye fixation another step forward, using “Trouble Man” as its backbone; even if it strikes you as corny, you have to admit that it is pretty slick. Above all, he continues to put one of the best voices in R&B to good use. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released March 8, 2019 | Thicke Music - EMPIRE

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Pop - Released November 11, 2016 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released January 1, 2011 | The Neptunes

Robin Thicke's Vegas streak goes back as far as his debut single, “When I Get You Alone.” Based on Walter Murphy's 1976 disco hit “A Fifth of Beethoven,” it had the backbone of a flashy and theatrical production, but at that point, Thicke was more of a (likable) snotty brat than a slick showman. Eight years later, after other large-scale songs like “Everything I Can’t Have,” “Magic,” and “Million Dolla Baby,” Thicke has settled into a suave, and even more swashbuckling, sound. Throughout the first quarter of Love After War, Thicke might as well be gunning for a Vegas residency. In the bombastic intro “An Angel on Each Arm,” one can picture Thicke strutting onto a decked-out stage with, well, female dancers beside him, and the song has a grinding riff that could be used as a repeated motif throughout the rest of the performance. On the overloaded “I’m an Animal,” Thicke goes hammier: “I’m smokin’ TNT, I’m drinkin’ dyn-o-mite -- can you still love me?!” Then, on “Never Give Up,” Thicke nearly drowns in a tidal wave of sound that comes from a sampled recording of Mexican composer José Pablo Moncayo's symphonic “Huapango.” After the all-together-now anthem “The New Generation,” Love After War scales back to slow, soft material with a couple exceptions. “Full Time Believer” is a happy-go-lucky theme for an admired woman, while “The Lil’ Things” and “What Would I Be?” are reflective/thankful songs that would be ideal for the tail end of Thicke’s Sin City New Year’s Eve blowout. Otherwise, the second half is dominated by ballads made for seduction (with more than a little preening). They don’t offer much in the way of development from Thicke’s recent past -- shut-eyed falsetto cooing, classy Brazilian touches, and 1976 Marvin Gaye moves in steady supply -- but they should get the job done. ~ Andy Kellman
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Pop - Released December 15, 2014 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released September 27, 2019 | Thicke Music - EMPIRE

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Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | The Neptunes

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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released January 1, 2006 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released August 6, 2015 | The Neptunes

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R&B - Released January 1, 2014 | The Neptunes

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Robin Thicke in the magazine