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Blues - Released August 23, 2019 | Provogue Records

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After emerging from the sacred pedal steel tradition in the African-American Pentecostal church, Robert Randolph has expanded the sonic possibilities of his instrument. Under Randolph's fingers, the pedal steel roars as the star of his fiery live shows, exploding the common perception that its best use was adding atmosphere behind country music weepers. After eight albums Randolph has settled into a forceful soul-gospel-blues-groove which he continues to enrich and explore with each new record. In this collaboration, recorded by skilled Nashville producer Dave Cobb (who also played guitar and co-wrote five of the album's tunes), Randolph mixes things up with a cover of the Pops Staples' "Simple Man," and on the funky, Meters-like "Second Hand Man." "Cut Em Loose" is a powerful hard rock number led by the kind of buzzsaw tone that won the jam band audience over to his cause years ago. The musical intensity increases on "Living Off the Love You Give," with Randolph letting loose on fierce, razor-like lead lines. Brighter Days closes with "Strange Train," another driving, jumpy, R&B-drenched dance tune where Randolph shows again why he is the pedal steel guitar's leading virtuoso. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Released February 17, 2017 | Masterworks

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Rock - Released February 17, 2017 | Masterworks

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Rock - Released September 25, 2006 | Warner Records

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Blues - Released July 22, 2003 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Dare Records

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Rock - Released June 18, 2010 | Warner Records

Even though Robert Randolph & the Family Band had already become famous for blending gospel, blues, and contemporary styles on their first two albums, they decided to bring that same sort of syncretism to their source material for the third, We Walk This Road. Toward that end, they brought in producer T-Bone Burnett, a man who knows a thing or two about reconciling American roots music with the modern world. The results succeed in extending the group's scope in a way that matches its sound. Randolph, who was only allowed to listen to Christian music growing up, has stated that Burnett's deep knowledge of blues history opened up new worlds for him, and the steel guitar star has reckoned that he ended up spending thousands of dollars "catching up" and buying music digitally. Ultimately, though, the process isn't important -- what matters is what Burnett and the band achieved together, and We Walk This Road is a consistently surprising tour de force that moves easily through rock, blues, R&B, gospel, and more, sometimes bringing them all together at the same time. "If I Had My Way," for example, modernizes Blind Willie Johnson's gospel-blues classic with touches of rock, electric blues, and hip-hop, as Randolph trades licks with guest Ben Harper. Musical roots of a comparatively more recent vintage are tapped as well, like on the swampy, funked-up version of John Lennon's "I Don't Wanna Be a Soldier Mama," which features some guest guitar from Doyle Bramhall II, and a groove-conscious, pop-savvy take on Prince's "Walk Don't Walk." Naturally, the most striking sonic thread connecting these winding paths together is the visceral but otherworldly "sacred steel" work of Randolph himself, which remains a wonder to behold no matter the context. © J. Allen /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 18, 2010 | Warner Records

Even though Robert Randolph & the Family Band had already become famous for blending gospel, blues, and contemporary styles on their first two albums, they decided to bring that same sort of syncretism to their source material for the third, We Walk This Road. Toward that end, they brought in producer T-Bone Burnett, a man who knows a thing or two about reconciling American roots music with the modern world. The results succeed in extending the group's scope in a way that matches its sound. Randolph, who was only allowed to listen to Christian music growing up, has stated that Burnett's deep knowledge of blues history opened up new worlds for him, and the steel guitar star has reckoned that he ended up spending thousands of dollars "catching up" and buying music digitally. Ultimately, though, the process isn't important -- what matters is what Burnett and the band achieved together, and We Walk This Road is a consistently surprising tour de force that moves easily through rock, blues, R&B, gospel, and more, sometimes bringing them all together at the same time. "If I Had My Way," for example, modernizes Blind Willie Johnson's gospel-blues classic with touches of rock, electric blues, and hip-hop, as Randolph trades licks with guest Ben Harper. Musical roots of a comparatively more recent vintage are tapped as well, like on the swampy, funked-up version of John Lennon's "I Don't Wanna Be a Soldier Mama," which features some guest guitar from Doyle Bramhall II, and a groove-conscious, pop-savvy take on Prince's "Walk Don't Walk." Naturally, the most striking sonic thread connecting these winding paths together is the visceral but otherworldly "sacred steel" work of Randolph himself, which remains a wonder to behold no matter the context. © J. Allen /TiVo
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Blues - Released August 23, 2019 | Provogue Records

Robert Randolph, after emerging from the sacred pedal steel tradition in the African-American Pentecostal church, has expanded the sonic possibilities of his instrument. Under Randolph's fingers, the pedal steel roars the star of his fiery live shows, exploding the common perception that its best use is adding atmosphere behind country music weepers. After eight albums Randolph has settled into a forceful soul-gospel-blues-groove which he continues to enrich and explore with each new record. In this collaboration, recorded by skilled Nashville producer Dave Cobb, Randolph mixes things up with a cover of the Staples pops' "Simple Man," and on the funky, Meters -like "Second Hand Man." "Cut Em Loose" is a powerful hard rock band by the kind of buzzsaw The musical intensity increases on "Live Off the Love You Give," with Randolph letting loose on fierce, razor-like lead lines.Brighter Days closed with "Strange Train," another driving, jumpy, R & B-drenched dance tune where Randolph shows up again. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Dare Records

For Robert Randolph & the Family Band, the three year break after 2010's somewhat stilted-sounding We Walk This Road was well deserved. By Randolph's own admission, their 280 date-per-year touring pace had taken its toll: playing music, let alone trying to find time to create it, had become a chore. Their Blue Note debut, Lickety Split, features an expanded FB lineup that includes vocalist Lenesha Randolph and guitarist Brett Haas; the group has gone back to its earliest recorded efforts for inspiration while furthering their new music considerably. The end result resembles their live sound more than any studio record in their catalog. Co-produced by the FB with Randolph's songwriting partners, it was primarily engineered and edited by Eddie Kramer, and mixed by Jim Scott. Opener "Amped Up" delivers the FB's trademark party-time meld of screaming hard rock, funk, gospel, blues, and R&B, all at full-tilt and in the raw. "Born Again" delivers the band's signature gospel message with celebration. The gorgeous call-and-response vocals between the Randolphs, and guest Bekka Bramlett, and the meaty, contrasting guitar interplay between Robert and Haas, are irresistible. Soul, Cajun-country, and gospel are at the heart of the dreamy yet earthy Lenesha-led, "New Orleans." Speaking of NOLA, Trombone Shorty lends his horn and energy to the gospelized, Crescent City-flavored stomp of "Take the Party." Carlos Santana makes two appearances here as well. On the driving funk of "Brand New Wayo," he delivers a fine, overdriven B.B. King nod when prompted by Randolph, while bassist Daniel Morgan lets his Bootsy freak flag fly and pushes the tune into the red. The rangy, pulsing hard rock gospel blues in the title track gets high marks for Randolph's tasty fills and the soulful vocal exchanges. The cover of the Ohio Players' "Love Rollercoaster" has its horns supplanted beautifully by the color palette from Randolph's pedal steel, and Morgan's knotty, funky bassline. The other cover here is an off-your-seat-and-on-your-feet reading of the Rascals' "Good Lovin," with Dwan Hill adding his B-3 to the mix and trading fours with Randolph, sending it all off in party-down version of a Möbius strip. Lickety Split is not only a joyous, unhindered return to form, but the group's finest studio offering to date. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Masterworks

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Rock - Released August 15, 2006 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 13, 2017 | Masterworks

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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Masterworks

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Rock - Released October 23, 2009 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released December 25, 2009 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released May 4, 2010 | Warner Records

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Blues - Released July 8, 2003 | Warner Records - Dare

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Blues - Released August 25, 2008 | Warner Records - Dare

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Blues - Released January 6, 2004 | Warner Records

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Robert Randolph & The Family Band in the magazine