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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Released October 7, 1997 | Dreyfus Jazz

The unique textures created by this duo, combining Galliano's masterful accordion with Portal's moody reeds, makes for a fascinating journey. Brilliant original works are interspersed with gems by Astor Piazzola and Hermeto Pascoal, making the rich tradition of accordion jazz that much richer. The crisp, 20-bit mastering rounds out the package as a delightful listening experience. © Tim Sheridan /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 12, 2019 | Editions Jade

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Duets - Released May 20, 2016 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Mozart meets the accordion and bandoneon? A rarity, perhaps! Richard Galliano finds, however, that the music of Mozart, as well as that of Bach, sounds especially beautiful on his favourite instrument…
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Having previously tackled the works of everyone from Bach to Billie Holiday, Frenchman Richard Galliano further showcases the versatility which has helped him to become the world's premier accordionist with this beautifully crafted tribute album to the legendary film composer Nino Rota. Recorded to celebrate the centenary of the late Italian's birth in 1911, its 20 tracks may lack the sweeping cinematics of the originals, but accompanied by a "dream team" quintet of trumpeter Dave Douglas, reedsman John Surman, bassist Boris Kozlov, and drummer Clarence Penn, Galliano treats them to an equally stylish arrangement that's bravely improvisational but never less than respectful. Other than the mournful trombone solo of opener "The Godfather Waltz" and an exquisite double bass-led reworking of "The Godfather's Love Theme," both from Francis Ford Coppola's 1972 masterpiece, and the self-penned vaudeville toe-tapping finale "Nino," the album focuses entirely on his work with Federico Fellini. And it's when Galliano allows himself to really let loose that the album best brings these iconic themes, many of which are more than 50 years old, most vividly to life, whether it's the skittering musette-folk interpretation of "Amarcord," the eerie ambience which opens the seductive lounge pop of "Giulietta Degli Spiriti (Rosa Avrata)," or the tense, circus themed take on "La Strada." A testament to the talents of both its source of inspiration and one of the many musicians who he inspired, Nino Rota is a clever and affectionate homage which makes the transition from classical to jazz appear effortless. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 1, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

A fascinating amalgam of personalities and styles, this 1996 release from Franco-Italian accordion virtuoso Richard Galliano achieves a wholly original musical synthesis. Bracketed by an opening track from tango ace Astor Piazzolla and a concluding piece from Jaco Pastorius, the session finds the common ground in such seemingly disparate choices. With nine Galliano originals in between, the result is a cohesive, uncompromising set of performances and an essential work in the leader's discography. The players with Galliano are a combination of Europeans and Americans equally at home in jazz and European folk music. Erstwhile Django Reinhardt prodigy Bireli Lagrene is a key contributor. Having emerged from his mentor's shadow in the late '80s, Lagrene reveals the range of his spectacular talents as a simpatico accompanist, a precise and articulate ensemble player, and a spellbinding soloist. Underscoring his evolution from his gypsy roots, Lagrene, on Galliano's "To Django," actually plays in a Wes Montgomery style or, more accurately, in the style of two or three Wes Montgomerys or Montgomery via Lenny Breau. Czech bassist George Mraz blends with and complements Lagrene so that the pair operates as an actual string section, not merely as bass and guitar. This stellar roster of talent is rounded out by modern drum legend Al Foster, who brings power, subtlety, and a jazz pulse to swing the whole affair. Throughout, the leader is a source -- as a writer, player, and soloist -- of romantic melodies, bright and melancholy, as well as sheer exuberance and technical dazzle, as he taps into the full polyphonic power of his accordion. Listeners who have yet to venture into jazz accordion will find a compelling introduction to the instrument with this set. © Jim Todd /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 20, 1998 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Tango accordion has a clear icon in the late Astor Piazzolla, but these days Richard Galliano is making a strong case for being the premier jazz accordionist. He's as lyrical as one needs, swings like mad, or brings tempos down to a sensual jog with passion and soul. When called upon, he can play a gut-wrenching tango or two himself. For this effort he's joined by two different crack rhythm sections, the brilliant Jean-François Jenny-Clark and Daniel Humair (seven tracks), or the slightly cut below Remi Vignolo and Andre Ceccarelli (four tracks), bass and drums respectively. It's not hard to hear a distinctly French but improvisationally Americanized sound. The lone standard, "You Must Believe in Spring," is one of many waltzes, but this one jumps from second to fifth gear, Galliano rapidly flying through the changes. The title track is also quick, with "Augusta" more a sprightly 3/4, while "L'Envers du Décor" is an easier modal three beat. Nods to Brazilian Hermeto Pascoal are heard on his composition "Bébé" and the mallets on drums and heavy conga beat-based fanfare and theme of "Passarinho." Galliano plays his accordion and whistles in unison on both tracks. Soprano saxophonist Michel Portal swings with Galliano, Humair, and Clark on the 6/8 "J.F.," while Clark duets with Galliano on "Sanguine," which is far from bloody, more like sweet sangria. "Heavy Tango" is as it is titled -- hard-driving and no holds barred -- and there's a slow samba, "Sanfona," one of nine of Galliano's written works. Even when the swing is light, as on "Caruso," Galliano's button pushing is active, pulsing, and popping. There's much to like on this, Galliano's most engaging CD. Perhaps some will beg for more variation, like the Portal cut. But these rhythm sections, especially Europe's finest Clark and Humair, push Galliano's artistry to greater heights, providing the listener with a unique experience in a jazz and even more so in a world music context. Highly recommended. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 6, 2001 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released April 1, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

The music on this CD, which is taken from a pair of duo concerts, is quite charming. Michel Portal, who alternates between reeds and a bandoneon, interacts closely with accordionist Richard Galliano on a variety of original material and folk songs. Their interpretations of a set of tangos and catchy tunes usually features the duet playing together and thinking as one rather than being a soloist accompanied by the other player. The rich melodies (several of these pieces deserve to catch on) and the compatibility of the two players make this an underrated program well worth exploring, particularly by those listeners who have never heard a good jazz accordion player. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Tango - Released April 1, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

In the hands of Richard Galliano, the mechanical intricacies of the accordion become agents of a compelling musical power, grace, and expression. A virtuoso of the instrument, Galliano exploits the complete orchestral potential of the keys, buttons, and air beneath his fingers. On Laurita, his musicianship is put in the service of utterly swinging jazz that is informed by the romantic and impressionistic influences of Galliano's French-Italian heritage. Call it the soundtrack for the boulevardier who likes to chase his espresso with a shot of bop. The core group on this 1995 session is Galliano, drummer Joey Baron, and bassist Palle Danielsson -- a formidable trio in which Baron's muscular, musical touch and Danielsson's rich tone and technique have unfettered space to interact with Galliano's multiphonics. Guest appearances are made by frequent Galliano collaborator Michel Portal on bass clarinet for two tracks, violinist Didier Lockwood on two, and harmonica virtuoso Toots Thielemans for two others. Each works wonderful alchemy with Galliano, their contributions extending and transforming the ideas, shapes, and colors of the leader's compositions and instrumental palette. The set, consisting mostly of the leader's originals, along with a pair from Galliano mentor Astor Piazzolla, has an exciting, contemporary freshness that marries jazz drive with an elegant take on the European folk tradition. The one notable departure from this vein is Galliano's "Mr. Clifton," a track where the trio manages to out-zydeco the song's namesake, zydeco king Clifton Chenier. © Jim Todd /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 15, 2019 | Jade

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Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Label Bleu

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Jazz - Released November 23, 2009 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 9, 2019 | Cézame Carte Blanche

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Jazz - Released April 1, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Latin - Released November 23, 2009 | Milan Music

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Jazz - Released April 1, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Classical - Released January 31, 2020 | Milan Records

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Jazz - Released May 3, 2010 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released June 8, 2009 | Dreyfus Jazz