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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1992 | RAL (Rush Associated Label)

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1996 | RAL (Rush Associated Label)

Despite a heavy dose of Redman's eccentric humor, Dare Iz a Darkside often threatened to disappear in a haze of blunt smoke, so for his third album, he and producer Erick Sermon backed off the muddled sonics of Darkside and returned to the hard funk of his debut set. There isn't as blatant a P-Funk/Zapp influence on Muddy Waters; the beats are more indebted to the new New York hardcore movement, and the tracks themselves are sparer and more bass-driven. Lyrically, Redman is as strong as ever, and if his subject matter hasn't changed all that much, he's still coming up with clever metaphors and loose, elastic rhyme flows. He projects more energy than Method Man (who appears on "Do What Ya Feel"), but isn't quite at the madman level of Busta Rhymes. The numerous skits tend to drag the album's momentum down a little, but overall, Muddy Waters solidifies Redman's growing reputation as one of the most consistent rappers of the '90s -- even when the music is unspectacular, he manages to deliver the goods on the microphone. ~ Steve Huey
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 13, 2015 | Gilla House Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 27, 2014 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1998 | RAL (Rush Associated Label)

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1994 | RAL (Rush Associated Label)

Redman may have become a household name among the rap community by the end of the '90s, but there was a time when he garnered little more than a cult following. Why? Well, Dare Iz a Darkside illustrates this better than any of his other '90s albums -- nowhere else has Redman ever been this odd, to be quite frank. It's fairly evident here that he'd been listening to his George Clinton records and that he wasn't fronting when he alluded to "A Million and 1 Buddah Spots" that he'd visited. In fact, this album often divides his fans. Many admire it for its eccentricities, while others deride it for being quite simply too inaccessible. It's almost as if Redman is trying to puzzle listeners on Dare Iz a Darkside with his continually morphing persona. In fact, there's actually little questioning his motives -- it's a matter of fact that Redman's trying to be as crazy as he can without alienating too many of those who first knew him for his affiliation with EPMD. And while that affiliation does aid this album, since Erick Sermon plays a large role in production, it's not quite enough. If this album has one unforgivable flaw besides the debatable quirks in Redman's persona, it's the production. Sermon isn't up to his usual standards here, unfortunately, and the album could really use some of his trademark funk. But the reason most fans either feel devotion or disdain for this album isn't the beats, but rather Redman's antics. If you appreciate his wacky sense of insane humor, this album is a gold mine. If you're more into his latter-day Method Man-style rhymes, then this album probably isn't one you want to bother with. After all, though Redman became a household name by the end of the '90s, it surely wasn't because of albums like this. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | RAL

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Miscellaneous - Released February 5, 2019 | Riveting Music - Gilla House

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 13, 2019 | Riveting Music - Gilla House

R&B - Released January 1, 2001 | RAL (Rush Associated Label)

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2007 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 13, 2018 | Riveting Music - Gilla House

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 24, 2018 | Riveting Music - Gilla House

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1998 | Def Jam Recordings

In 1998, rap music experienced a high level of commercial acceptance and exploitation, the magnitude of which had scarcely been seen before. Most major record labels embraced artists whose images and portrayals revolved around financial decadence, violence, and substance abuse. These are issues that have always been somewhere in the mix of hip-hop culture, but in the late '90s such subjects took total precedence over previously, at least equally, appreciated subjects such as lyrical agility, humor, positivity, and self-awareness. Redman represents a few of these attributes -- humor and lyrical agility in particular -- on Doc's da Name 2000. The sound Redman achieves on this album is characteristic of his previous albums. With production credits going mostly to Erick Sermon, the bass-intensive and melodic beats on Doc's da Name 2000 allow Redman to deliver the raw Newark, NJ, flow for which he's known and liked. Redman produced a few of the songs on this album, including "Jersey Yo!." A mildly funny skit that describes the attitude of a certain "Little Bricks" resident precedes this selection. There are actually five skits on the album, which, like most skits on an often-played album, become very unfunny after a few repetitions. On "Jersey Yo!" Redman uses a slow and funky guitar sound over tight drums and a fluid bassline. Redman is also responsible for the production of "Da Goodness," a song that features Busta Rhymes. The instrumentation in this song has a futuristic, almost minimal, sound that mimics the music Busta Rhymes frequently flows over. Not stopping there, Redman spits lyrics in "Da Goodness" with what could be identified as Busta's lyrical style -- and he does it well. The result is an entertaining song that exemplifies Redman's skill as a talented lyricist and producer. "Beet Drop," another cut produced by Redman, is a brief but funny cover of the Beastie Boys' "It's the New Style." Other MCs that join Redman here include Method Man on "Well All Rite Cha"; Double O, Tame, Diezzel Don, Gov-Mattic, and Young Z (of the Outsiders) on "Close Ya Doorz"; Markie and Shooga Bear on "My Zone!"; and Erick Sermon and Keith Murray on "Down South Funk." Fans should note that the latest episode of "Sooperman Lova (IV)" is witness to "sooperman lova switching to sooperman villain." The last selection on this album is a gem -- a rhyme delivered over a jungle (aka drum'n'bass) rhythm track that was produced by the well-known Roni Size. A close look at the liner notes reveals an additional unique item on Doc's da Name 2000: Redman had A&R, marketing, and project coordination responsibilities on this album -- a scenario not often seen in the music industry. ~ Qa'id Jacobs
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2007 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2009 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2007 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | Def Jam Recordings

By dropping words like “pop” and “crossover” while promoting an album on which he dares to use Auto-Tune, Redman gave his fans a heads-up that Reggie isn’t your everyday effort. Based on his real name, Reginald Noble, Reggie is actually an extroverted and exuberant alter ego for Redman, the kind of guy who does production for Shaq if you check your copy of Shaq-Fu: Da Return. No surprise, then, that Reggie the album is heavy on the special guests with everyone from Bun B to Kool Moe Dee landing on the track list, while Redman acts as ringleader and/or hypeman. Folks who want it strictly hardcore won’t be satisfied till the high-kicking “Tiger Style Crane” closes the show, but since the miraculous Red can go from hood cool (“Lookin’ at my rolly...”) to nerd cool (“...I got time like Culture Club”) in just one punch line, he deserves a swing at the Ghostdini-style album. Big hooks drive infectious choruses on club bombs like “That’s Where I Be” (“You pissed baby?/Don’t get pee’d on/Cuz man/I run things like cream corn”), "Def Jammable" (“Don’t gas me/I live near Amoco”), and "Full Nelson" (“I do it Big like March 9th in Brooklyn”), while “All I Do” with Faith Evans is the first track in Red’s discography that could be tagged “breezy,” paying tribute to the power of hip-hop and Michael Jackson over a lush backbeat. The Auto-Tune device is used but not abused and even the dressed-up numbers don’t come off as soft, as Red is always willing to drop a line that packs an improper punch. Uptight types who want him to save hip-hop will hate on this one, but this ain’t nuthin’ but a party y’all, and a fun one at that. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 22, 2000 | Famous Records, Corp.

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 1995 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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