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Rock - Released August 13, 2010 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 26, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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With Part of the Light (2018), Ray LaMontagne returned to his roots with his mix of Nick Drake-style folk, southern soul, fat-free blues and classic rock. The psychedelic influences of old Pink Floyd albums that were noticeable on Ouroboros (2016) felt like a distant memory. With Monovision, the American songwriter cements his sound, confirming that it’s closer to Cat Stevens than David Gilmour. With this eighth album, he’s a little closer to sitting on the throne of Americana. When he presses down on the accelerator (Strong Enough), the virile toughness of Creedence Clearwater Revival doesn’t feel too far away. And when he starts daydreaming (We’ll Make It Through) it’s hard – especially with the harmonica – not to think of Neil Young. But at the age of 46 and having spent more than two decades on the scene, Ray LaMontagne has a sound of his own. Yes, he has rather typical voice though it never stops him venturing past the heavy shadows of his spiritual forefathers. So much so that this extremely purified 2020 vintage is perhaps the album that sounds most like Ray LaMontagne. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 4, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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In 2016 Ray LaMontagne once again threw everyone off guard with Ouroboros. Not really surprising coming from someone who could never quite be put in a specific genre with his blend of haunted folk à la Nick Drake, southern soul, refined blues and classic rock. With this sixth album created with Jim James from the band My Morning Jacket, the songwriter from New Hampshire provided a new piece to his stylistic puzzle. Ouroboros featured the markers of his previous album while bringing a new dreamy, almost psychedelic touch, straight out of an old Pink Floyd record. LaMontagne had never sounded so haunted and dreamlike… Two years later, Part Of Light takes him back to more roots and classical considerations: an heir to Cat Stevens rather than David Gilmour. This seventh opus is above all else carried by an impressive spiritual force. An impulse wrapped in a sound full of reverberation, giving his songs more power. And splendour. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 29, 2006 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 15, 2004 | RCA Records Label

The best songs on Trouble, the debut release from songwriter Ray LaMontagne, draw on deep wells of emotion, and with LaMontagne's sandpapery voice, which recalls a gruffer, more sedate version of Tim Buckley or an American version of Van Morrison, they seem to belie his years. The title tune, "Trouble," is an instant classic, sparse and maudlin (in the best sense), and songs like "Narrow Escape," a ragged, episodic waltz, are equally impressive, with careful, cinematic lyrics that tell believable stories of wounded-hearted refugees on the hard road of life and love. Most of the tracks fall into a midtempo shuffle rhythm, so the words have to carry a lot in order to avert a sort of dull sameness, and when it works, it works big, and when it doesn't, well, LaMontagne is so serious and sincere about his craft that you tend to forgive him instantly. Sara Watkins of Nickel Creek guests on "Hannah" and the sad, somber lullaby "All the Wild Horses," playing fiddle and adding vocals, and producer Ethan Johns adds drums and other touches on most tracks. The sound is measured and sparse, with few frills (a five-piece string section is used on a few tracks, but is never intrusive), all of which supports the emotional urgency of LaMontagne's writing. "How Come" sounds a bit like a rewrite of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright," and a couple of other cuts seem a bit labored, but overall this is an impressive debut by an extremely special songwriter. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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In 2016 Ray LaMontagne once again threw everyone off guard with Ouroboros. Not really surprising coming from someone who could never quite be put in a specific genre with his blend of haunted folk à la Nick Drake, southern soul, refined blues and classic rock. With this sixth album created with Jim James from the band My Morning Jacket, the songwriter from New Hampshire provided a new piece to his stylistic puzzle. Ouroboros featured the markers of his previous album while bringing a new dreamy, almost psychedelic touch, straight out of an old Pink Floyd record. LaMontagne had never sounded so haunted and dreamlike… Two years later, Part Of Light takes him back to more roots and classical considerations: an heir to Cat Stevens rather than David Gilmour. This seventh opus is above all else carried by an impressive spiritual force. An impulse wrapped in a sound full of reverberation, giving his songs more power. And splendour. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 25, 2014 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released October 13, 2008 | RCA Records Label

Ray LaMontagne's third album, Gossip in the Grain is as different from 2007's Till the Sun Turns Black as that album was from 2006's Trouble. The deep, heart-of-night atmospherics of the preceding disc have been jettisoned in favor of a brightly lit palette of textures and instruments that legendary producer and multi-instrumentalist Ethan Johns uses to illustrate LaMontagne's considerable ambitions as a writer. The set opens with the singer channeling his inner Memphis soul man on "You Are the Best Thing." Horns, strings, and a female backing chorus underscore LaMontagne's heartfelt uptempo rasp that touches on Sam Cooke as much as it does Tim Buckley with a hook worthy of Stax/Volt. In terms of sequencing, it certainly grabs the listener, but it is also arguably the best track here. "Let It Be Me" follows with a folksier, looser soul groove, where acoustic guitars, a Telecaster, piano, and strings underscore the hypnotic lilt in the verse. But LaMontagne can write a coda and a bridge and he gets his voice right into the meat of the lyric. We may have heard lyrics of this type a thousand times before, as they evoke loneliness and longing, but rarely have they been expressed this authentically and this dramatically. Echoes of Van Morrison's Astral Weeks are apparent in the gorgeous chamber jazz of "Sarah," and eerie, psychedelic British Isles folk -- complete with an otherworldly pedal steel -- haunts the grooves on "I Still Care for You." LaMontagne and Johns are able to create varying yet webbed atmospheres in these songs. Ray can find a style and write in it as if he'd created it. Johns adds so much depth and dimension in the mix that it feels as if both singer and songwriter will never be able to extricate themselves either from the emotional intentions expressed in his lyrics, or from the sound itself. The most notorious track on this set is the humorous yet tender "Meg White," for the White Stripes' drummer. With its imaginative use of an Ennio Morricone-esque spaghetti western intro, Johns playing Wurlitzer and Mellotron, a Pink Floyd cadenza, and drumming of the sort White trademarked, it's no throwaway; add to this a seemingly sincere offer of friendship and empathy and there is an undeniable emotional appeal. "Hey Me, Hey Mama," has a back porch singalong feel, and features a banjo, trombone, and trumpet. The rambling free-form blues of "Henry Nearly Killed Me, (It's a Shame)" touches on Canned Heat, John Lee Hooker, and the Rolling Stones; it's another high point here. Gossip in the Grain is LaMontagne's most adventurous recording, yet in many ways it's also the most focused and well executed. The partnership with Johns has become almost symbiotic at this point; his songwriting has become so confident, sure, and expressive -- despite the ready intimacy in its subject matter -- that he's become a kind of force majeure. One thing is certain, that given the consistency and vision LaMontagne has shown on all three albums, punters are certain to follow him wherever he goes next. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 8, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released March 15, 2017 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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Pop - Released June 28, 2005 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released March 7, 2006 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released July 1, 2016 | RCA Records Label

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 4, 2018 | RCA Records Label

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Rock - Released April 25, 2014 | RCA Records Label