Similar artists

Albums

$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$16.49
$14.49

Soul - Released January 1, 2002 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$17.99
$15.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$17.99
$15.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released May 1, 2012 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released August 15, 1987 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$11.49

R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
At a concert held at Herndon Stadium in Atlanta on May 28, 1959, Ray Charles turns in a blistering version of "What'd I Say" and takes on the big-band era with versions of Tommy Dorsey's "Yes Indeed!" and Artie Shaw's "Frenesi," not to mention performances of "The Right Time" and "Tell the Truth." [This album was reissued in 1973 as a part of a two-record set, packaged with Ray Charles at Newport under the title Ray Charles Live (Atlantic 503)]. ~ William Ruhlmann
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
$12.99

Jazz - Released November 25, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
Some players from Ray Charles' big band are joined by many ringers from the Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands for the first half of this program, featuring Charles belting out six songs arranged by Quincy Jones. "Let the Good Times Roll" and "Deed I Do" are highlights, and there are solos by tenorman David "Fathead" Newman, trumpeter Marcus Belgrave, and (on "Two Years of Torture") tenor Paul Gonsalves. The remaining six numbers are ballads, with Charles backed by a string orchestra arranged by Ralph Burns (including "Come Rain or Come Shine" and "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Cryin'"). Charles' voice is heard throughout in peak form, giving soul to even the veteran standards. ~ Scott Yanow
$129.49

R&B - Released September 20, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Ray Charles' seminal recordings for Atlantic have been boxed once before, as the triple-disc 1991 set The Birth of Soul. That box contained 53 tracks, the best moments of what is arguably the best period of Charles' career, but Rhino/Atlantic's 2005 seven-disc sequel, Pure Genius, doesn't bother with merely the highlights: as its subtitle makes clear, this is The Complete Atlantic Recordings (1952-1959). This is undeniably a major historical release, since it gathers all of the recordings Charles made at his creative peak, not just as a leader, but as a sideman for his saxophonist David "Fathead" Newman and sides he recorded with jazz vibraphonist Milt Jackson. Also, it's not limited to studio recordings -- live sessions, later issued on the LPs Ray Charles in Person and Ray Charles at Newport, are here too. Despite the abundance of music here, there's not much that hasn't seen the light of day before. It may not seem that way at first glance, since the seventh disc contains nothing but unreleased material, but the great majority of that is devoted to a full-length rehearsal session with producer Ahmet Ertegun from 1953 -- something that is interesting to hear once, since it does give some insights into Ertegun and Charles' working relationship and how Ray acted in the studio, but even then, it's not exactly revelatory. So, apart from that rehearsal, outtakes of "(Night Time Is) The Right Time" and "Tell Me How Do You Feel" and an excellent DVD of Ray live at Newport from 1960, Pure Genius is devoted to material that has been reissued extensively during the CD era -- which is another way of saying that most fans will have this music already. Still, presented here in chronological order according to recording sessions, it's hard not to marvel at Charles' development as an artist and be astonished by his range. That is what makes this set worthwhile as something more than a library piece -- listening to the first six discs from beginning to end reveals exactly how restless and creative Ray was during this period. Most listeners will be satisfied by more concise collections of this period -- and even those who truly love the hard R&B and soul of Charles' Atlantic hits will likely find The Birth of Soul a more satisfying box, since it is devoted to that sound, whereas the rest of the music here that's not on the 1991 box is largely devoted to jazz sides and live performances -- but any serious fan or historian of American music will find this set essential. (Nevertheless, they may find the packaging of the set somewhat infuriating: it's a clever, well-designed replica of an old-fashioned, all-in-one record player, with the hardcover book and eight discs stored inside. It's a nice package, but a bit impractical, particularly for those who just want the music.) ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
$38.49

R&B - Released September 24, 1991 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The title isn't just hype -- this absolutely essential three-disc box is where soul music first took shape and soared, courtesy of Ray Charles' church-soaked pipes and bedrock piano work. Brother Ray's formula for inventing the genre was disarmingly simple: he brought gospel intensity to the R&B world with his seminal "I Got a Woman," "Hallelujah I Love Her So," "Leave My Woman Alone," "You Be My Baby," and the primal 1959 call-and-response classic "What'd I Say." There's plenty of brilliant blues content within these 53 historic sides: Charles' mournful "Losing Hand," "Feelin' Sad," "Hard Times," and "Blackjack" ooze after-hours desperation. No blues collection should be without this boxed set, which comes with well-researched notes by Robert Palmer, a nicely illustrated accompanying booklet, and discographical info aplenty. ~ Bill Dahl
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
$12.99

R&B - Released January 8, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
$12.99

R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
$16.49
$14.49

Rock - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
$11.49

R&B - Released May 8, 2012 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
$10.49

R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Taken from the same three sessions as The Great Ray Charles but not duplicating any of the performances, this set casts Charles as a jazz-oriented pianist in an instrumental setting. Brother Charles has five numbers with a trio (three songs have Oscar Pettiford on bass) and jams on three other tunes ("Hornful Soul," "Ain't Misbehavin'," and "Joy Ride") with a septet arranged by Quincy Jones; solo space is given to David "Fathead" Newman on tenor and alto and trumpeter Joseph Bridgewater. Fine music -- definitely a change of pace for Ray Charles. ~ Scott Yanow
$12.99

R&B - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard

Artist

Ray Charles in the magazine
  • The Qobuz Minute #15
    The Qobuz Minute #15 Presented by Barry Moore, The Qobuz Minute sweeps you away to the 4 corners of the musical universe to bring you an eclectic mix of today's brightest talents. Jazz, Electro, Classical, World music ...