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Punk / New Wave - Released September 9, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$74.49
$64.49

Punk / New Wave - Released November 24, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The rules of the game were certainly perfectly clear after their first album: in the third instalment of the Ramones' story, they surpassed themselves. And even refined their art! Once again, with this Rocket to Russia, released on 4 November 1977, at the height of the Cold War, it was all about three-chord symphonies, enthusiastically cretinous and 100% adolescent hi-jinks and above all, taking rock'n'roll back to its birthplace: the garage! But the refrains of Sheena Is A Punk Rocker or Teenage Lobotomy are peerless in their re–imagining of their rock’n’roll, bubblegum pop and surf heritage. And even when they cover the cult tracks Surfin’ Bird by the Trashmen or Do You Wanna Dance? (made famous by Cliff Richard, the Beach Boys and even Bette Midler) our delinquent punks from Queens produced savage and raw rock like nobody else! This edition to mark the 40th birthday of this sublime sonic attack offers two mixes of the album: the original, and a new mix, entitled Tracking Mix by Ed Stasium, the sound engineer on the original release. It also includes 24 rare or unreleased tracks, demos, alternative versions and B–sides. And the cherry on the cake is a dazzling, unreleased live version by the four Ramones brothers (all from other mothers) recorded on 19 December 1977 the Apollo Centre in Glasgow, Scotland. © MZ/Qobuz
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Punk / New Wave - Released July 21, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions Best New Reissue
The years go by and the legacy left by the Ramones still puts down more and more roots in the great history of the pop music of the twentieth century. The false brothers from Queens have actually never taken their dirty and used Converse elsewhere than down the beaten path of a certain rock’n’roll tradition going from surf music to girl groups. With stupidity as philosophy, teenage insouciance as credo, supersonic guitars as weapons of mass destruction, their albums—binary in their form, really enjoyable in their content—give birth to hymns of bubble-gum pop on amphetamines that are a lot more serious than they seem. Just like this Leave Home, their second studio album released in January 1977, only nine months after their first one! A good thumb in the nose of the rock scene, with, in the role of the icing on the cake, classics like I Remember and, above all, Pinhead, from which comes their famous battle cry: Gabba Gabba Hey! In 80 titles splits on 3 CDs, this generous deluxe remastered edition celebrates the fortieth birthday of this masterpiece that couldn’t have been more influential, overloaded with demos, B sides, remixes and live titles recorded in 1977 at the CBGB, the New-York punk mecca. In short, our verdict is in: gabba gabba hey! © MZ
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Punk / New Wave - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$64.49

Punk / New Wave - Released September 9, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$16.49

Punk / New Wave - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released April 23, 1976 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
With the three-chord assault of "Blitzkrieg Bop," The Ramones begins at a blinding speed and never once over the course of its 14 songs does it let up. The Ramones is all about speed, hooks, stupidity, and simplicity. The songs are imaginative reductions of early rock & roll, girl group pop, and surf rock. Not only is the music boiled down to its essentials, but the Ramones offer a twisted, comical take on pop culture with their lyrics, whether it's the horror schlock of "I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement," the gleeful violence of "Beat on the Brat," or the maniacal stupidity of "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue." And the cover of Chris Montez's "Let's Dance" isn't a throwaway -- with its single-minded beat and lyrics, it encapsulates everything the group loves about pre-Beatles rock & roll. They don't alter the structure, or the intent, of the song, they simply make it louder and faster. And that's the key to all of the Ramones' music -- it's simple rock & roll, played simply, loud, and very, very fast. None of the songs clock in at any longer than two and half minutes, and most are considerably shorter. In comparison to some of the music the album inspired, The Ramones sounds a little tame -- it's a little too clean, and compared to their insanely fast live albums, it even sounds a little slow -- but there's no denying that it still sounds brilliantly fresh and intoxicatingly fun. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Punk / New Wave - Released June 19, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Punk / New Wave - Released November 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The Ramones provided the blueprint and Leave Home duplicated it with lesser results, but the Ramones' third album, Rocket to Russia, perfected it. Rocket to Russia boasts a cleaner production than its predecessors, which only gives the Ramones' music more force. It helps that the group wrote its finest set of songs for the album. From the mindless, bopping opening of "Cretin Hop" and "Rockaway Beach" to the urban surf rock of "Sheena Is a Punk Rocker" and the ridiculous anthem "Teenage Lobotomy," the songs are teeming with irresistibly catchy hooks; even their choice of covers, "Do You Want to Dance?" and "Surfin' Bird," provide more hooks than usual. The Ramones also branch out slightly, adding ballads to the mix. Even with these (relatively) slower songs, the speed of the album never decreases. However, the abundance of hooks and slight variety in tempos makes Rocket to Russia the Ramones' most listenable and enjoyable album -- it doesn't have the revolutionary impact of The Ramones, but it's a better album and one of the finest records of the late '70s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$74.49
$64.49

Punk / New Wave - Released September 21, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res
It’s all very well starting a revolution, but then what? In 1978, this exact question was tormenting the Ramones. After three previous albums that would later be considered essential in the history of rock’n’roll (at the time, however, sales remained modest), the “punk rock godfathers” from Queensland were hungry for recognition and greenbacks. What’s more, England was on the attack with bands like the Sex Pistols and The Clash… Without revolutionizing the Tablets of Stone from their previous records (traditional rock’n’roll ranging from surf music to girl group styles, with stupidity as their philosophy, teen carelessness as their belief and guitars as their weapons of mass destruction), the Ramones injected some significant changes into Road To Ruin. We hear guitar solos and even ballads such as the cover of Needles And Pins that was popularised by Jackie DeShannon and the Searchers. But it is when they remain true to their beliefs that they’re most convincing, as proved by the hit I Wanna Be Sedated that would later be covered by artists as diverse as Offspring, Mötley Crüe, Juliana Hatfield, the Go-Go's and even Bruce Springsteen! When the album was released in September 1978, a few fans complained that the Ramones had changed, when in reality all that the group had done was put a few drops of water in their wine… Forty years later, the album returns in all its glory. This Deluxe edition offers the original remastered version as well as a new stereo mix called Road Revisited Mix by Ed Stasium, free of the commercial varnish of the time. Hardcore fans will also be able to enjoy around twenty bonus tracks, most of which are new: rough mixes, alternate takes, outtakes and rarities. Also on the menu is a live performance recorded at the Palladium in New York on December 31st 1979, mixed by Stasium and broadcasted at the time on WNEW-FM. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$16.49

Punk / New Wave - Released June 5, 2006 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$64.49

Punk / New Wave - Released September 21, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

It’s all very well starting a revolution, but then what? In 1978, this exact question was tormenting the Ramones. After three previous albums that would later be considered essential in the history of rock’n’roll (at the time, however, sales remained modest), the “punk rock godfathers” from Queensland were hungry for recognition and greenbacks. What’s more, England was on the attack with bands like the Sex Pistols and The Clash… Without revolutionizing the Tablets of Stone from their previous records (traditional rock’n’roll ranging from surf music to girl group styles, with stupidity as their philosophy, teen carelessness as their belief and guitars as their weapons of mass destruction), the Ramones injected some significant changes into Road To Ruin. We hear guitar solos and even ballads such as the cover of Needles And Pins that was popularised by Jackie DeShannon and the Searchers. But it is when they remain true to their beliefs that they’re most convincing, as proved by the hit I Wanna Be Sedated that would later be covered by artists as diverse as Offspring, Mötley Crüe, Juliana Hatfield, the Go-Go's and even Bruce Springsteen! When the album was released in September 1978, a few fans complained that the Ramones had changed, when in reality all that the group had done was put a few drops of water in their wine… Forty years later, the album returns in all its glory. This Deluxe edition offers the original remastered version as well as a new stereo mix called Road Revisited Mix by Ed Stasium, free of the commercial varnish of the time. Hardcore fans will also be able to enjoy around twenty bonus tracks, most of which are new: rough mixes, alternate takes, outtakes and rarities. Also on the menu is a live performance recorded at the Palladium in New York on December 31st 1979, mixed by Stasium and broadcasted at the time on WNEW-FM. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
$17.99

Punk / New Wave - Released April 29, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released June 19, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

The Ramones provided the blueprint and Leave Home duplicated it with lesser results, but the Ramones' third album, Rocket to Russia, perfected it. Rocket to Russia boasts a cleaner production than its predecessors, which only gives the Ramones' music more force. It helps that the group wrote its finest set of songs for the album. From the mindless, bopping opening of "Cretin Hop" and "Rockaway Beach" to the urban surf rock of "Sheena Is a Punk Rocker" and the ridiculous anthem "Teenage Lobotomy," the songs are teeming with irresistibly catchy hooks; even their choice of covers, "Do You Want to Dance?" and "Surfin' Bird," provide more hooks than usual. The Ramones also branch out slightly, adding ballads to the mix. Even with these (relatively) slower songs, the speed of the album never decreases. However, the abundance of hooks and slight variety in tempos makes Rocket to Russia the Ramones' most listenable and enjoyable album -- it doesn't have the revolutionary impact of The Ramones, but it's a better album and one of the finest records of the late '70s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$64.49

Punk / New Wave - Released November 24, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

The rules of the game were certainly perfectly clear after their first album: in the third instalment of the Ramones' story, they surpassed themselves. And even refined their art! Once again, with this Rocket to Russia, released on 4 November 1977, at the height of the Cold War, it was all about three-chord symphonies, enthusiastically cretinous and 100% adolescent hi-jinks and above all, taking rock'n'roll back to its birthplace: the garage! But the refrains of Sheena Is A Punk Rocker or Teenage Lobotomy are peerless in their re–imagining of their rock’n’roll, bubblegum pop and surf heritage. And even when they cover the cult tracks Surfin’ Bird by the Trashmen or Do You Wanna Dance? (made famous by Cliff Richard, the Beach Boys and even Bette Midler) our delinquent punks from Queens produced savage and raw rock like nobody else! This edition to mark the 40th birthday of this sublime sonic attack offers two mixes of the album: the original, and a new mix, entitled Tracking Mix by Ed Stasium, the sound engineer on the original release. It also includes 24 rare or unreleased tracks, demos, alternative versions and B–sides. And the cherry on the cake is a dazzling, unreleased live version by the four Ramones brothers (all from other mothers) recorded on 19 December 1977 the Apollo Centre in Glasgow, Scotland. © MZ/Qobuz
$51.49

Punk / New Wave - Released October 25, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Not many bands can honestly say they changed the shape of rock & roll as we know it and upended part of the larger global culture at the same time. The Ramones did just that; by stripping down and speeding up rock & roll like a hot rod that could outrun all competition, and injecting it with a massive dose of snotty, absurdist humor, they gave the music a new lease on life, and left behind a handful of brilliant recordings that are still a solid kick to hear nearly four decades after their debut hit the streets. Punk rock first emerged from a very specific time and place, but the best of it is timeless in its joyous roar, and the first four Ramones albums absolutely live up to that description. Those four albums -- 1976's Ramones, 1977's Leave Home, 1977's Rocket to Russia, and 1978's Road to Ruin -- are included in the box set The Sire Years 1976-1981, along with 1980's End of the Century (a conceptually brilliant but musically flawed collaboration with producer Phil Spector) and 1981's Pleasant Dreams (the first Ramones album that could have been described as blah, though it has a few great tunes, most notably "The KKK Took My Baby Away" and "7-11"). The six albums appear here in the same crisp-sounding remasters that appeared in 2001 and 2002, but have been stripped of their bonus tracks, which makes one wonder why Rhino/Warner Bros. didn't opt for a three-disc set, since the albums are short enough to fit two to a CD. And while each disc gets its own cardboard sleeve that replicates the original LP artwork, there are no liner notes or any kind of accompanying booklet that would include the credits. One can quibble about the packaging and presentation of The Sire Years, yet there's no denying the strength of this music; the first four Ramones albums are essential to any decent collection of rock & roll, and though End of the Century and Pleasant Dreams pale in comparison, they still wipe the floor with nearly all of the thousands of bands who followed the Ramones' example. This isn't the ideal presentation of this music, but if your Ramones collection has mysteriously disappeared, this will catch you up on their most essential albums in one fell swoop and then some. ~ Mark Deming
$16.49

Punk / New Wave - Released September 21, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$16.49

Punk / New Wave - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

$12.99

Punk / New Wave - Released September 21, 1978 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

When the Ramones started work on their fourth album, Road to Ruin, in early 1978, they were in something of a bind. Their previous three albums had helped spark the punk revolution and established them as one of the greatest bands in the long and checkered history of rock & roll, but they weren't getting the sales that their label wanted or breaking out in the mainstream the way some of their N.Y.C. compatriots like Blondie had. The Ramones also wanted those things, so they made some major moves. One switch was personnel-based, as Tommy Ramone passed the sticks to Marc Bell, who had played with Dust and Richard Hell. Tommy stayed on as producer, though, and he and Ed Stasium enacted the biggest revamp. Once the band had laid down the basic tracks for the new batch of songs, the pair painstakingly added guitar, bass, and keyboard overdubs and mixed them to get a much fuller and polished sound. By the time they were done, sometimes barely anything from the original sessions remained. This approach worked well with the more diverse songs the band brought to the album. Along with the usual batch of three-chord rockers (including some new entries in the I Wanna/Don't Wanna category), they wrote jangling pop songs ("Don't Come Close") and melancholy ballads (Dee Dee's painfully introspective "Questioningly"), and covered the Searchers' "Needles and Pins" with a lightly poppy touch. The expanded arrangements work really well on these songs -- the twanging bassline and keening guitar solo add a surprisingly effective country touch to "Don't Come Close" -- and they don't dilute the powerful punch of the thundering rockers like "I Don't Want You" and "Bad Brain." The classic "I Wanna Be Sedated" is a perfect example of how well the new approach worked for the band. The guitar overdubs give the song a huge sound, the massive handclaps and Bell's thumping drums drive the beat home like jackhammers, and Joey's voice comes through like a 1,000-watt beacon. His vocals reached their peak right around this time; he carried the faster songs with authority and dug into the ballads completely, transmitting an almost painful amount of emotion. It's clear throughout that Tommy and Stasium definitely had the best interests of the band in mind as they aimed the sound a little closer to the mainstream, and the changes they made served to open it up in interesting ways. Sure, some of the raw power of the previous albums was lost, but it was replaced by deeper feelings and emotion. The question was whether Ramones fans really wanted those two things, or did they just want more songs about Sheena. That's debatable, but what's clear is that the band's noble efforts didn't pay off with the general record-buying public, and Road to Ruin was their worst-charting release to that point. ~ Tim Sendra
$16.49

Punk / New Wave - Released August 20, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Ramones in the magazine